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Leylines (UK) - My findings

leylines

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#1    greywolfe

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 03:41 PM

Leylines are a most curious phenomena first made famous by an author called Alfred Watkins circa 1928. His book "The Old straight Track" was inspired by a vision he had whilst hiking in the county of Herefordshire in the U.K. where he lived.
The vision he had was of the countryside suddenly becoming interlaced with lines that connected old churches and other places of antiquity. As a result of this split seconds insight Alfred undertook a study of the area using maps and made the discovery that many old churches were indeed connected to each other along perfectly straight lines. Many readers of his work became captivated and sought to undertake similar studies of there own. My own interest having been stimulated led me to make an initial study of my neighborhood. I began my studies using a 1 inch to the mile ordinance survey map. First of all I drew a circle around all the churches that I knew to be (a few) centuries old. Then with a ruler I began checking to see if any of these markers formed straight lines obviously using 3 churches as the minimum criteria. Almost immediately I found many 3 church alignments and a fair number of 4 and 5 church lines. The plot thickened when I extended the lines by some 15 miles or so beyond the last confirmed marker of an alignment. I found that if I extended all the alignments that even though they didn't pass through any more churches - some of these extended lines crossed at exact points on the map. I called these points (Ley crossroads). Using these crossroads themselves as a confirmed marker some of the unconfirmed 2 church leys were now confirmed. It was really a Eureka moment to know that I'd discovered ancient knowledge that absolutely nobody else was aware of. There are other markers that frequently occur on leylines such as pieces of perfectly straight modern roads that follow the route of pre-medieval tracks. Lakes and natural markers such as prominent hills are found often found along the lines. Another more quirky finding is if you regard a church as a central point and draw imaginary circular spiral pattern out from that point - then do a similar exercise with a neighboring church or marker - you may find that the nodes of intersection of the spirals unearth further markers that also form Ley-lines. In addition to markers and geometry, place names are extremely useful as confirmation of a Leys existence. Very old place names such as Cole (Coleshill) or White (Whitecross) etc are examples along with Dodd or Bury and so on. A vital feature to include as a marker in any map search are ancient burial grounds or Earthworks. Alfred Watkins was firmly of the opinion that these tracks were devised as a navigational/ transport network from bygone times. Many students since then have proposed a multitude of other solutions to the riddle. I personally think that sections of the system were perhaps used as roads but am convinced that this was not their primary function. There are many curious folk lore legends attached to the lines as any researcher will soon discover. When I actually visited sites I'd identified, all sorts of confirmations started to appear. Most curious were names of old cottages on the alignments such as Coles Farm or Bury Hill. The most famous Ley-line junction is possibly Stonehenge. What stuck me most about visiting Stonehenge was that it is surround by literally hundreds of earth mounds and other Ley features . From the air the miles surrounding Stonehenge look like a 4000 year old metropolis with the henge itself looking almost insignificant within the mass of features that surround it. The fact that churches contribute so heavily in Ley hunting is a little misleading really. It is not the church itself that's important here it's the land upon which it was built. It became usual with the onset of Christianity to build churches on old pagan sites to lure the enthusiasm of the old ways of the people to the new movement. Upon the old Pagan sites there often stood large standing stones (In fact many church yards still have these relics of Paganism). I think (and many others) believe these monoliths to be key to understanding the Ley-line puzzle. The stones it is thought may have been booster stations forming a network or energy management crossing the entire UK ( &other lands beyond). What type of energy connected the sites is open to much debate. Curiously some stones shows signs of cup marks on their surfaces of various diameters that may have served as satellite type dishes sunken into the surface with their diameters devised to control different frequencies. It is my belief that the energy manipulated by the network was gravity itself. As yet scientist have not been able to detect gravity-waves and I'm sure it's because they simply don't exist. I believe that gravity is a product of distorted space time engineered by the presence of mass. As gravity is a very subtle force it seems feasible to me that the mass of a large stone could be sufficient to cause a local micro-gravitational effects that positioning of the stone and (dish) features upon it's surface could be fashioned in such a way as to harness the (energy/space-time ripple). The mass of Ayres rock in Australia is magnificent example of micro-gravitational anomalous events.
Whatever truth is eventually found to be behind the purpose Ley-lines - it's certainly remains the most captivating of mysteries to solve.



#2    Farmer77

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 04:35 PM

Great post!

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#3    Abramelin

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 06:04 PM

In 2004, John Bruno Hare wrote:

    "Watkins never attributed any supernatural significance to leys; he believed that they were simply pathways that had been used for trade or ceremonial purposes, very ancient in origin, possibly dating back to the Neolithic, certainly pre-Roman. His obsession with leys was a natural outgrowth of his interest in landscape photography and love of the British countryside. He was an intensely rational person with an active intellect, and I think he would be a bit disappointed with some of the fringe aspects of ley lines today".


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ley_line


#4    Taun

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 06:17 PM

I have to admit that in the 70's I read a book about Ley Lines and was convinced they were indeed something very special... Until I looked at maps of local areas and realised that a person could easily find 'Ley Lines', almost anywhere....

I still think it's interesting - and fun to see what lines up with what... but it's nothing "special" IMO...


#5    Abramelin

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 08:01 PM

Posted Image

80 4-point alignments of 137 random points


#6    laver

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:21 PM

It is easy to dismiss alignments of sites on the basis of random probability but we should perhaps remember that it is now generally accepted that very ancient sites were aligned to the sun, moon and stars with great knowledge and skill. This must have involved the selection of suitable sites. There is no reason to dismiss the possibilty that this knowledge and skill was not also used in the placement of sites to form alignments or patterns in the landscape.

The geometry used in Stone Age sites has now been demonstrated to be advanced and this would seem to be related to the spiritual beliefs of people at that time but the use of very large and durable stone structures might indicate that it was also intended to be a message for future generations. This message is one we should maybe try and understand and not ignore or dismiss.


#7    Swede

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 12:32 AM

View Postgreywolfe, on 20 June 2013 - 03:41 PM, said:

The stones it is thought may have been booster stations forming a network or energy management crossing the entire UK ( &other lands beyond).  

It is my belief that the energy manipulated by the network was gravity itself. As yet scientist have not been able to detect gravity-waves and I'm sure it's because they simply don't exist.

I believe that gravity is a product of distorted space time engineered by the presence of mass.


A true tribute to the credibility of the "Ley Line" "concept".

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#8    Harte

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 01:33 AM

View Postlaver, on 20 June 2013 - 10:21 PM, said:

It is easy to dismiss alignments of sites on the basis of random probability but we should perhaps remember that it is now generally accepted that very ancient sites were aligned to the sun, moon and stars with great knowledge and skill. This must have involved the selection of suitable sites. There is no reason to dismiss the possibilty that this knowledge and skill was not also used in the placement of sites to form alignments or patterns in the landscape.
"Suitable sites" for such alignments have to do with visibility concerning the horizon, and not any bogus, imaginary lines that "cross" at a particular location.

View Postlaver, on 20 June 2013 - 10:21 PM, said:

The geometry used in Stone Age sites has now been demonstrated to be advanced
Bullsheet. Period. Extra period.
Harte

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#9    jaylemurph

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 02:01 AM

View PostFarmer77, on 20 June 2013 - 04:35 PM, said:

Great post!

...for demonstrating the dangers of a poor font choice and lack of paragraph formatting? I and my bleeding eyes certainly agree.

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#10    laver

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:10 AM

View PostHarte, on 22 June 2013 - 01:33 AM, said:

"Suitable sites" for such alignments have to do with visibility concerning the horizon, and not any bogus, imaginary lines that "cross" at a particular location.


Bullsheet. Period. Extra period.
Harte

The work of Professor Thom would seem to suggest otherwise or were Stone Age folk incapable of setting out a round circle ?


#11    shrooma

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 11:55 PM

View Postlaver, on 22 June 2013 - 09:10 AM, said:



The work of Professor Thom would seem to suggest otherwise or were Stone Age folk incapable of setting out a round circle ?
.
maybe if you'd actually read some Thom instead of just skimming a wiki about him, you'd have found that most stone 'circles' are actually ellipses.
being a MUCH harder geometric construct, A. Thom was more concerned about elliptical sites than circles, but of course, you already knew that didn't you, from your years of painstaking research into the subject.
(also, Thom hated the 'mystical' ley-line concept.)

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#12    laver

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 07:04 PM

View Postshrooma, on 22 June 2013 - 11:55 PM, said:

.
maybe if you'd actually read some Thom instead of just skimming a wiki about him, you'd have found that most stone 'circles' are actually ellipses.
being a MUCH harder geometric construct, A. Thom was more concerned about elliptical sites than circles, but of course, you already knew that didn't you, from your years of painstaking research into the subject.
(also, Thom hated the 'mystical' ley-line concept.)

That is the point ! why make complex geometric forms, and Professor Thom's research indicated they did, when a simple circle is so easy to set out. There must be a reason and Thom indicates that they were demonstrating a knowledge of geometry which does not equate to the accepted view of people at that time. The twin circle with vesica is a design he suggested was used which makes one think of the much larger example found by David Furlong on the Marlborough Downs with his proposed links to the Great Pyramid in Egypt.
If the ancient folk could do this then alignments of sites would be quite a straightforward matter and 'ley' lines are a very real possibility and well worth careful consideration.

NB Please cut out the personal insults; it probably just demonstrates to some UM users your immaturity.


#13    Swede

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 08:50 PM

View Postlaver, on 23 June 2013 - 07:04 PM, said:

...'ley' lines are a very real possibility and well worth careful consideration.


You have previously been provided with the citation for Williamson and Bellamy, which you apparently have not yet bothered to procure. To reiterate said:

Williamson, Tom and Liz Bellamy
1983 Ley Lines in Question. Littlehampton Book Services Ltd.

Should you question Williamson's credentials, you will find that he is well published in the field of landscape archaeology:

http://www.uea.ac.uk...on#publications

For more lay-oriented evaluations of "Ley Lines":

http://www.skeptical...lines-debunked/

http://www.badarchae...om/?page_id=878

As to Thom: 1) His professional background was in engineering 2) His concepts were not generally considered credible in his own time nor have they received any notable additional support in more recent history. Burl was quite scathing in regards to Thom's "megalithic yard":

http://articles.adsa...000103.000.html

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#14    shrooma

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 09:15 PM

heeere we go again with the 'personal insults' crap. you need to find the 'maturity' to distinguish between an insult and criticism.
as to the Thom thing, did I cite him as a reference?
or was that you....?
it was you wasn't it.
I merely pointed out you were wrong in your findings.
so trying to discredit someone you used as a source doesn't seem all that wise to me.
or mature.
but we've been through this before, haven't we, on another thread, where you cited references, and I showed you the glaring holes in them, to which you tried the same immature deflection tactics as here.
maybe laver, if you can't face criticism of your posts, then public forums might not be your ideal medium.....

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#15    laver

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 09:30 PM

View PostSwede, on 23 June 2013 - 08:50 PM, said:

You have previously been provided with the citation for Williamson and Bellamy, which you apparently have not yet bothered to procure. To reiterate said:

Williamson, Tom and Liz Bellamy
1983 Ley Lines in Question. Littlehampton Book Services Ltd.

Should you question Williamson's credentials, you will find that he is well published in the field of landscape archaeology:

http://www.uea.ac.uk...on#publications

For more lay-oriented evaluations of "Ley Lines":

http://www.skeptical...lines-debunked/

http://www.badarchae...om/?page_id=878

As to Thom: 1) His professional background was in engineering 2) His concepts were not generally considered credible in his own time nor have they received any notable additional support in more recent history. Burl was quite scathing in regards to Thom's "megalithic yard":

http://articles.adsa...000103.000.html

.

Thank you for the references

The problem is that so much of 'established' opinion does not want to consider the possibility of ancient alignments and the geometric layouts of ancient sites because it would mean a complete rethink about ancient times. But the evidence is out there on the landscape in many ways. We do not know were the inspiration to build a site like Stonehenge came from or the skill and motivation to construct it. There were clearly some very wise and influential people behind it over a considerable period of time yet we have been encouraged, no doubt for various reasons, not to consider it.
Professor Thom came up with some interesting proposals which may well prove to be substantially valid when we can see the full picture.





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