Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Have You Come Here to Die?

buddhism

  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1    RedHouseHendrix

RedHouseHendrix

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Joined:25 Jun 2013

Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:33 PM

Have You Come Here to Die?

A talk given by Ajahn Brahmavamso to the monks at Bodhinyana Monastery during the 2004 Rains Retreat


When we are meditating we often encounter our defilements, and this is one of the wonderful things about our rains retreat – there is no escape – or at least it is not easy to escape. You’d have to be pretty ingenious to find ways of escaping from this monastery at this time of the year. So there’s nothing much to do but to face your own mind. You have two choices, either you suffer or you get peaceful. Out of those two I’d encourage the latter. Get peaceful, and calm the mind.

http://www.dhammatal...here_to_die.htm

Edited by Still Waters, 25 June 2013 - 07:45 PM.
Shortened amount of copied text and added source link


#2    ouija ouija

ouija ouija

    dimple

  • Member
  • 10,116 posts
  • Joined:20 Oct 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:UK

  • I never walk alone.

Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:40 PM

Not many people are going to read such a long post, I'm afraid.

I can't face it at the moment ........ may try later.

Sorry :hmm:


OH! Welcome to UM! :D

Life is all too much ............................................. and not enough.

It is only when you form your question precisely and accurately that you receive the true answer.

#3    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 7,490 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

  • If you didn't see it with your own eyes, or hear it with your own ears, don't invent it with your small mind and share it with your big mouth!

Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:52 PM

View PostRedHouseHendrix, on 25 June 2013 - 07:33 PM, said:

Have You Come Here to Die?

have to agree with Ouija on this, so can i just answer the first question for the time being?


Have You Come Here to Die?
That was not my intentions when I joined this forum.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#4    Ashotep

Ashotep

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,450 posts
  • Joined:10 May 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

  • Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway-John Wayne

Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:04 PM

I hope I didn't come here to die but I could fall face down over the keyboard one of these days.

Welcome to the forum.


#5    Jeffertonturner

Jeffertonturner

    Hero Squad

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,093 posts
  • Joined:21 Jan 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Brunswick, Canada

  • I may not be the smartest, or the best looking, or the most successful but...what was I saying? I'm depressed.

Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:07 PM

I did actually. Weird eh? ;)

Welcome!

~Life goes by pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while -and do whatever you want all the time -you can miss it.~

#6    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 7,490 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

  • If you didn't see it with your own eyes, or hear it with your own ears, don't invent it with your small mind and share it with your big mouth!

Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:16 PM

View PostHilander, on 25 June 2013 - 08:04 PM, said:

I hope I didn't come here to die but I could fall face down over the keyboard one of these days.

Welcome to the forum.
LOL, aint that the truth.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#7    ouija ouija

ouija ouija

    dimple

  • Member
  • 10,116 posts
  • Joined:20 Oct 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:UK

  • I never walk alone.

Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:59 PM

Okay, I got about halfway through and gave up. It just seems to be a circular ramble, going through reams and reams of excessive detail. The only positive thing I can think of is that it would be very interesting as a basis for meditation ...... but talking about it, not so good.

Can I ask what was your purpose in posting this talk, and also, what does it mean to you?

I guess the idea is to 'be dead to the material world' but continue living your life without attachments? (Maybe it says that further on than I read).

Edited by ouija ouija, 25 June 2013 - 09:02 PM.

Life is all too much ............................................. and not enough.

It is only when you form your question precisely and accurately that you receive the true answer.

#8    RedHouseHendrix

RedHouseHendrix

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Joined:25 Jun 2013

Posted 25 June 2013 - 09:39 PM

I guess this isn't a good topic for people who are unfamiliar with Buddhism or new to Buddhism, I should have realized that.  I think talking about death and contemplating one's death is an extremely beneficial undertaking.   Things in our lives that we make out to be so important that cause us all kinds of mental anguish are quit often very minor especially in comparison with death.  Also, contemplating death tends to spur one on in one's practice, but I should have had the good sense to start out with other Buddhist concepts since the vast majority of people in the western world are so caught up in materalism that death is the last thing they want to talk about.  Thank you all for your input and for welcoming me to this site.


#9    redhen

redhen

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,825 posts
  • Joined:14 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Samsara

Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:19 PM

The Cemetery Contemplations of the The Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta are not unique.

"The Stoics recommend an important psychological technique that involves repeatedly imagining future catastrophes as if they are happening now and viewing them with detached indifference.  Seneca, who refers to this particularly often, calls is praemeditatio malorum, or the premeditation of adversity."

In William Irvine’s A Guide to the Good Life: the Ancient Art of Stoic Joy , he calls it Negative Visualisation & Hedonic Adaptation.


#10    RedHouseHendrix

RedHouseHendrix

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Joined:25 Jun 2013

Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:54 PM

Redhen,
  I'm glad you brought that up because I actually do that too.  I don't know if I've been programmed to feel this way by movies/tv but it does seem that we live in a time when the possibility of some catastophic event is very great.  In order not lose control of ones mind in the event that such an occurance should take place I feel it's beneficial to contemplate such things.  Your thoughts at the time of your death are considered to have a great effect on where you will end up in your next life according to Buddhist teachings.  Thank you for your reply.


#11    redhen

redhen

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,825 posts
  • Joined:14 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Samsara

Posted 25 June 2013 - 11:19 PM

People balk at the cemetery meditations as being gruesome, but it's just one technique to realize the Buddhist teaching of impermanence (annica). I don't want to hijack this thread but there are similarities between these meditations and Stoic negative visualization. Once you've finished either of these techniques, you suddenly value what you still have and don't take them for granted.



cheers


#12    StarMountainKid

StarMountainKid

    Cheese

  • Member
  • 4,099 posts
  • Joined:17 Feb 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Star Mountain, Corporate States of America

  • We have problems because we stray from what is innocent and pure.

Posted 26 June 2013 - 01:47 AM

If we are attached to the material world, death is frightening because we will loose all of our nice possessions. If we are attached to our "self", death is frightening because we will loose who we are.

If we are not attached to our possessions, if we realize there is in reality no "self", no separate "me" as subject observing the object, that what we are is fundamentally awareness, and that this awareness it is not some entity that is aware of itself, then what is lost in death?

This kind of awareness is not "my" awareness, it is awareness itself. It may be located in my individual brain, but when the lights go out, "I" have lost nothing because there is no "I" to loose anything.

Whether it is actually possible to be in this state of mind is a question I cannot answer for myself. It may be only some intellectual ideal and not achievable in real life. Jiddu Krishnamurti says one must die to the illusion of the self. I think in this sense one must already have died to understand death.

The acceptance of authority does not lead to intelligence.
A mind untouched by thought...the end of knowledge.
My credentials: http://www.unexplain...ic=87935&st=225

#13    Beany

Beany

    Government Agent

  • 3,329 posts
  • Joined:26 Jul 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:California

  • If music is the most universal language just think of me as one whole note. Nikki Giovanni

Posted 26 June 2013 - 05:29 AM

People contemplate or meditate on their own mortality when they're ready. It's part of a process and we all move at our own unique pace. The same with detachment. I do think that contemplation of life is every bit as important as thinking about death. To live fully and to die both take courage, the difference is that we have a choice about how to live our lives, no choice about dying. I don't think the vast majority of humanity is all about acquisition & material success. Sure, it's important to many people, but seldom is it the only motivator, and it's important to see the world and people is as balanced a way as possible. When we make general statements about groups of people we dehumanize them and fail to see the qualities which we all share, and as we diminish others, so we diminish ourselves.


#14    RedHouseHendrix

RedHouseHendrix

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Joined:25 Jun 2013

Posted 26 June 2013 - 11:14 AM

Beany,
   In Buddhism we do not try to dehumanize people, we have compassion and understanding for them even if they want to do us harm.  Metta meditation (loving kindness to all beings) is without question one of the foundations of Buddhism.  The Buddha placed this practice on par with that of mindfullness, when you consider how often he spoke of that practice you realize just how important metta is to this religion.  Being a westerner myself (born and bred) I think it is self evident that the vast majority of people in the west are extremely materialistic and that tends to make one push the thought of one's death to very back of one's mind.   I am stating what I believe to be a fact, I feel sorry for them, I certainly do not have any ill-will towards them.  I do at times have thoughts of ill-will but I've got a long ways to go before I reach the ultimate goal.


#15    libstaK

libstaK

    Nosce Te Ipsum

  • 6,898 posts
  • Joined:06 Feb 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

  • Hello Reality and all that is True
    When Oxymoron was defined it was just for you

Posted 26 June 2013 - 11:58 AM

View PostRedHouseHendrix, on 25 June 2013 - 10:54 PM, said:

Redhen,
  I'm glad you brought that up because I actually do that too.  I don't know if I've been programmed to feel this way by movies/tv but it does seem that we live in a time when the possibility of some catastophic event is very great.  In order not lose control of ones mind in the event that such an occurance should take place I feel it's beneficial to contemplate such things.  Your thoughts at the time of your death are considered to have a great effect on where you will end up in your next life according to Buddhist teachings.  Thank you for your reply.
For myself, I think I came here to face myself and my attachments and kill them off so I can truly live.

"I warn you, whoever you are, oh you who wish to probe the arcanes of nature, if you do not find within yourself that which you seek, neither shall you find it outside.
If you ignore the excellencies of your own house, how do you intend to find other excellencies?
In you is hidden the treasure of treasures, Oh man, know thyself and you shall know the Universe and the Gods."

Inscription - Temple of Delphi





Also tagged with buddhism

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users