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Light Aircraft Engine Fail Nosedives Mystery

nosedive mystery

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#1    NatureBoff

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 05:44 PM

This video shows a light aircraft which loses it's single engine power at a height of around 200ft after take-off. He lands without serious injury. So why are so many light aircraft crashes appear to have the pilot unconscious/confused and pushing forward on the stick?



Here's just the latest. Small plane crashes on takeoff at Fallbrook Airpark, 1 minor injury reported. There was another bad crash at the same airport on Mar05 2012, with a major injury. I've come across ten to twenty such nose into the ground bad crashes in some earlier research I did. These unfortunate incident mysteries are likely to be on the rise imo.


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  • FallbrookAirparkCrash.JPG

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#2    NatureBoff

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 12:03 PM

Here is another example: Weather conditions were pretty good and there's not a lot of wind.

He tried to land just after dark..

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  • LightAircraftCrash.jpg

Edited by RingFenceTheCity, 03 July 2013 - 12:05 PM.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#3    Babe Ruth

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 01:02 PM

How do you know he pushed forward on the stick?  When did he do that?

Have you considered starting a thread about why there are automobile accidents?


#4    Rafterman

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 02:23 PM

Because some pilots are lucky and some aren't.

"For me, it is better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
                                                                                                                                           - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World:  Science as a Candle in the Dark

#5    NatureBoff

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:24 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 03 July 2013 - 01:02 PM, said:

How do you know he pushed forward on the stick?  When did he do that?
I used the phrase loosely because I have read many cases of such nosedive accidents in the past. I'm not saying it definitely applies in this case. It's the fact that experienced pilots can generally land in good conditions without any problem, whether at night or not. So why would the onset of darkness cause the accident. It doesn't really make sense.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#6    NatureBoff

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:25 PM

View PostRafterman, on 03 July 2013 - 02:23 PM, said:

Because some pilots are lucky and some aren't.
That's the statement of someone who isn't scientfically minded and doesn't have any experience of flying what-so-ever.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#7    Rafterman

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:43 PM

View PostRingFenceTheCity, on 03 July 2013 - 03:24 PM, said:

I used the phrase loosely because I have read many cases of such nosedive accidents in the past. I'm not saying it definitely applies in this case. It's the fact that experienced pilots can generally land in good conditions without any problem, whether at night or not. So why would the onset of darkness cause the accident. It doesn't really make sense.

Because you can't see.

"For me, it is better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
                                                                                                                                           - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World:  Science as a Candle in the Dark

#8    Rafterman

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:44 PM

View PostRingFenceTheCity, on 03 July 2013 - 03:25 PM, said:

That's the statement of someone who isn't scientfically minded and doesn't have any experience of flying what-so-ever.

Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?

"For me, it is better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
                                                                                                                                           - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World:  Science as a Candle in the Dark

#9    seaturtlehorsesnake

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:45 PM

so do you just see any plane crash as an excuse to advance your pet theory?


#10    Yes_Man

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:18 PM

View PostRafterman, on 03 July 2013 - 03:44 PM, said:

Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?
Good one


#11    NatureBoff

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:37 PM

View Postpatagonianhorsesnake, on 03 July 2013 - 03:45 PM, said:

so do you just see any plane crash as an excuse to advance your pet theory?
No, I look at as many as I can to see a possible link. Of course, a lot of light aircraft plane crashes don't fit this hypothesis. Many do.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#12    NatureBoff

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:45 PM

View PostRafterman, on 03 July 2013 - 03:44 PM, said:

Someone who posts the kind of stuff you post commenting on someone not being scientifically minded - now that's funny.

How many hours of stick time do you have?
I was in the gliding club at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. I was the only person in my class to get a distinction in aerodynamics at college. I saw many Farnborough airshows. My line manager was a former test pilot. I had a career as a Scientific Officer. I worked in a building at the end of the main runway and as a specially trained first aider, in the unfortunate event of a crash, it was my responsibility to run onto the runway and divert people away from spilt aviation fuel. I didn't even achieve solo flight ability, but that's beside the point, I have hundreds of take-offs and landings as first-hand experience. I'm more credible than just about anyone on this subject. If anyone has this experience combined with technical research, then I'd love to hear it.

Edited by RingFenceTheCity, 03 July 2013 - 05:47 PM.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#13    Jacques Terreur

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:45 PM

my dear source of credibility:  i followed some of your posts, but still i wasn't able to make any sense of all that. all i got is that you attribute random failure of machinery with something that appears to be a fixed idea of yours and then flaming people that doubt you.


Help me out man, what is your point????


#14    Rafterman

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:50 PM

View PostRingFenceTheCity, on 03 July 2013 - 05:45 PM, said:

I was in the gliding club at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. I was the only person in my class to get a distinction in aerodynamics at college. I saw many Farnborough airshows. My line manager was a former test pilot. I had a career as a Scientific Officer. I worked in a building at the end of the main runway and as a specially trained first aider, in the unfortunate event of a crash, it was my responsibility to run onto the runway and divert people away from spilt aviation fuel. I didn't even achieve solo flight ability, but that's beside the point, I have hundreds of take-offs and landings as first-hand experience. I'm more credible than just about anyone on this subject. If anyone has this experience combined with technical research, then I'd love to hear it.

Then why do you display such a lack of understanding about aircraft, how they work, and in some cases how they don't?

"For me, it is better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
                                                                                                                                           - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World:  Science as a Candle in the Dark

#15    Shiloh17

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 03:58 AM

The top video shows the plane lose power, he turns left slightly and sees nothing but trees and water, so he turns right and aims for the clearing.  He clearly is using back elevator in an attempt to keep the plane in the air as seen in the side view camera. Just look at the elevator. He has it pulled back.





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