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37 million dead bees in one Ontario farm


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#16    lightly

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:29 AM

.. just think of all the  JOBS  that will be available pollinating fields .. by hand.      (<cryptic sarcasm and think tank thinking)   :w00t:

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#17    GirlfromOz

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 12:42 PM

Good thought 'Lightly'!A new form of employment created in the midst of a crisis.Wow! Now why didn't any of us think of that?


#18    Babe Ruth

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:00 PM

View PostMikko-kun, on 06 July 2013 - 10:07 PM, said:

There's problems and there's solutions. The problem and it's source are pretty evident in this case. If it wasn't a big chemical-biochemical corporation, the most likely candidate I'd say would be climate change, and pollution the second.

I hate it when people obey the law so much they can't save the world.

I hate it when poor laws are passed and never repealed.

Plus, I hate it when good laws, the few that exist, are never enforced.  The epitaph for the human species will be full of examples of us being our own worst enemy.


#19    lightly

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:49 PM

View PostGirlfromOz, on 07 July 2013 - 12:42 PM, said:

Good thought 'Lightly'!A new form of employment created in the midst of a crisis.Wow! Now why didn't any of us think of that?

    I like your positive take on it...  but , honestly , i was thinking more along the lines of.... You get to pollinate 10 acres of cucumbers for FOODCO   and you get to eat,  that day.  
  The peanut pollination division will pay you in peanuts.   Bees dying off is a very bad thing.. and it's being ignored ?

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#20    Ashotep

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:52 PM

View PostGirlfromOz, on 05 July 2013 - 02:12 PM, said:

I came home one day to a swarm of bees at my front door.There were thousands of them.I know it is not wise to walk into a swarm but I thought,well hell,this is my home & they gotta go somewhere else.I just very carefully walked through them saying" Hey sweeties,this is my house & I'm going inside to my home.They must have heard me because I had not one sting on my way in.Mind you I was fully clothed with a jacket & jeans etc coming from work.In the past couple of days prior,I had the experience of a bee near my workplace warehouse flying over & landing just below my eye on my face.I tried to keep my cool and he/she eventually flew off my face.PHEW! LOL!Maybe that was a scout that warned all other colonies that I was a friend! LOL Now I have a loquat tree in my backyard & I notice that many bees fly through it.I thought that there was a decline in Bee population ,but with this tree,I have faith that there still is a functioning Bee population & many colonies here in Sydney Australia.
Good thing those weren't killer bees.  We have those in the US now and they will sting you to death will little provocation.


#21    Ashotep

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:58 PM

It always worries me when we have a mass death of bees like this.  One of these days too many will die and it will be past the point of no return.  Any more if I get a bee in my house I don't kill it I capture it and turn it lose.  I need them more than they need me.


#22    MySummerJob

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 11:39 AM

Good thing scientists are working on robots to help pollinate =)

(In case anyone doesn't know, it was announced back in March)

http://inhabitat.com...ations-decline/

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#23    redhen

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 12:15 PM

View PostMySummerJob, on 22 July 2013 - 11:39 AM, said:

Good thing scientists are working on robots to help pollinate =)

(In case anyone doesn't know, it was announced back in March)

http://inhabitat.com...ations-decline/

The comments on that article show that people will not be fooled by techno-pie-in-the-sky. Neonicotinoids are the most likely culprit, that's why the EU has prohibited them.


#24    mysticwerewolf

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:59 AM

I am assuming that mites don't count, and American and European foulbrood don't count.  to many people kill them each year  Many years ago( late 80s) I had one of the hives die off because a bug sprayer deliberately sprayed my hive  he was spraying the local pine trees for some beetle and I called across the fence and asked s if the stuff was poisonous to bees and he said yes it was   so I told him I had honey bees and he needed to avoid this area.   he shrugged and didn't say anything  so I walked away. I was twenty feet away when I felt something on my neck and turned to see him deliberately spraying the hive  full pressure  it cost him 15K in damages but ultimately he won the case because while I got monetary damages I was trying to put him out of business. it was determined that he had the right to spray the trees and bushes in the yard he had contracted to spray that that there was not enough evidence that it wasn't accidental.. after all they are just bugs
  to many people just don't care  about anything except money


#25    mysticwerewolf

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 01:04 AM

what I am finding interesting is a that in a lot of areas wild hives are not having any problems it is only the commercial hives that are having problems.  there are not nearly as many honey bees around my place as there were when I had 1 or more hives of bees around ( early 80s to late 90s) but I still see them all the time


#26    jules99

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 07:09 AM

View Postlightly, on 07 July 2013 - 01:49 PM, said:

I like your positive take on it...  but , honestly , i was thinking more along the lines of.... You get to pollinate 10 acres of cucumbers for FOODCO   and you get to eat,  that day.  
  The peanut pollination division will pay you in peanuts.   Bees dying off is a very bad thing.. and it's being ignored ?

Hand pollination of  rhododendrons looks interesting;



Bees dying off will be felt at our own expense, the implications are disastrous.


#27    mysticwerewolf

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 08:34 AM

And bumblebees are not doing much better, granted they don't do as much as a average hive of honey bees ( their hives are much smaller and some plants have flowers that are just too small for a bumblebee)  they seem to be slowly vanishing as well, and there is nothing in the news about that because nobody uses bumble bees for pollination ( therefore making money off them) except mother nature.

Edited by mysticwerewolf, 23 July 2013 - 08:35 AM.


#28    redhen

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:16 PM

View Postmysticwerewolf, on 23 July 2013 - 08:34 AM, said:

and there is nothing in the news about that because nobody uses bumble bees for pollination ( therefore making money off them) except mother nature.

The ICUN has only recently formed a bumblebee group to do assessments as to their status.


#29    mysticwerewolf

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 11:10 PM

View Postredhen, on 23 July 2013 - 12:16 PM, said:

The ICUN has only recently formed a bumblebee group to do assessments as to their status.
better late than never I guess, but  as I have only seen two bumblebees this year it may already be too late  in my area. OH and I just saw  my fifth honey bee of the year today.

Edited by mysticwerewolf, 23 July 2013 - 11:13 PM.


#30    mysticwerewolf

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 09:28 AM

View PostGirlfromOz, on 05 July 2013 - 02:12 PM, said:

I came home one day to a swarm of bees at my front door.There were thousands of them.I know it is not wise to walk into a swarm but I thought,well hell,this is my home & they gotta go somewhere else.I just very carefully walked through them saying" Hey sweeties,this is my house & I'm going inside to my home.They must have heard me because I had not one sting on my way in.Mind you I was fully clothed with a jacket & jeans etc coming from work.In the past couple of days prior,I had the experience of a bee near my workplace warehouse flying over & landing just below my eye on my face.I tried to keep my cool and he/she eventually flew off my face.PHEW! LOL!Maybe that was a scout that warned all other colonies that I was a friend! LOL Now I have a loquat tree in my backyard & I notice that many bees fly through it.I thought that there was a decline in Bee population ,but with this tree,I have faith that there still is a functioning Bee population & many colonies here in Sydney Australia.
  
when a honey bee stings something the stinger pulls out and it dies.   When a hive of bees splits itself into two or more hives, the bees in the swarm all fill both their stomachs with honey.   when they find the correct spot for a new hive this honey in the stomachs  is what is going to keep them alive until the hive is established and producing their own food.  Every bee that stings something is  another chance for the hive to fail.  normal honey bees know this and are not going to sting except as a last resort during a swarm,  as far as African bees I don't know if this is true or not but for a fact when I had bees I stood in the middle of a swarm several times and collected them several times. Honey bees are fascinating to watch at close range.

Edited by mysticwerewolf, 11 August 2013 - 09:34 AM.





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