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The Morality of Meditation

meditation buddha

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#16    Frank Merton

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 12:16 AM

I love it the way a room full of monks can sit doing for all practical purposes the exact same thing for an hour and then have a vigorous discussion afterward about exactly what it is they were doing.


#17    LostSouls7

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 08:23 AM

I do notice mediating does give me more focus on what I am trying to do and helps me think more deeply.
But I also do it to energize myself and get myself into the state of mind that I want to.

At night it's great for relaxation

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#18    Zaphod222

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 10:01 AM

View PostStill Waters, on 09 July 2013 - 12:34 PM, said:


Can anyone spot the error in the good professors logic here:

"The results were striking. Although only 16 percent of the nonmeditators gave up their seats — an admittedly disheartening fact — the proportion rose to 50 percent among those who had meditated. This increase is impressive not solely because it occurred after only eight weeks of meditation, but also because it did so within the context of a situation known to inhibit considerate behavior: witnessing others ignoring a person in distress — what psychologists call the bystander effect — reduces the odds that any single individual will help. Nonetheless, the meditation increased the compassionate response threefold."

A banana if you do, and a slap with a wet fish if you don´t. This really is not even psychology 101.... the guy should be embarrassed calling himself a professor and not knowing the difference between coincidence and cause.

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#19    Frank Merton

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 01:31 PM

Why do I sit?  (By the way, if you want to be seen as sophisticated on this topic, call it "sitting," not "meditating.")  Well it's part of my routine.  I learned it in the States (few Vietnamese meditate unless they are monks) through the Japanese tradition of becoming mindful of your breathing (that sounds silly but it leads to becoming mindful of a lot of things it is good to be mindful of).

I guess it helps me relax, but not as much as Schubert; it helps my blood pressure, but I still take my water pills; it helps me make decisions, but not nearly as much as sleeping on something.  It can help tremendously with inspiration, but seems never to do so when you really need it.  That is to say, sitting to think about a problem doesn't help, but a few weeks later while sitting with your mind elsewhere the solution will hit you out of the blue.

Where it really helps is with emotions and, back to mindfulness, with awareness of how we really feel about things.






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