Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Hubble Finds New Neptune Moon [merged]

neptune s/2004 n 1 hubble nasa

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,962 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:12 PM

NASA Hubble Finds New Neptune Moon


www.nasa.gov said:

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new moon orbiting the distant blue-green planet Neptune, the 14th known to be circling the giant planet.

The moon, designated S/2004 N 1, is estimated to be no more than 12 miles across, making it the smallest known moon in the Neptunian system. It is so small and dim that it is roughly 100 million times fainter than the faintest star that can be seen with the naked eye. It even escaped detection by NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew past Neptune in 1989 and surveyed the planet's system of moons and rings.


Posted Image Read more...


"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#2    NatureBoff

NatureBoff

    SandersonHapgood

  • Banned
  • 3,491 posts
  • Joined:23 Oct 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:19 PM

Fascinating stuff. There's still so much we don't know.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#3    Spacenut56

Spacenut56

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 506 posts
  • Joined:26 May 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spokane, Washington

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:08 PM

Seems like now a days, just about each day we are finding either new planets or new moons on planets we didn't know they had! Just amazing how fast we are finding stuff now.


#4    keithisco

keithisco

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Member
  • 6,510 posts
  • Joined:06 May 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southampton, Blighty!

Posted 16 July 2013 - 05:27 PM

Dont expect to see this new moon with the naked eye...

"The Hubble space telescope has discovered a new moon orbiting Neptune, Nasa has confirmed.
Designated S/2004 N 1, this is the 14th known moon to circle the giant planet.
It also appears to be the smallest moon in the Neptunian system, measuring just 20 km (12 miles) across, completing one revolution around Neptune every 23 hours.
US astronomer Mark Showalter spotted the tiny dot while studying segments of rings around Neptune.
Nasa said the moon was roughly 100 million times dimmer than the faintest star visible to the naked eye".

Link (courtesy BBC): http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-23318301


#5    bison

bison

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,640 posts
  • Joined:13 Apr 2011

Posted 17 July 2013 - 03:38 PM

The newly discovered little moon is an enigma. So small, it should have been swept up into a larger nearby moon during the episode of Triton's capture by Neptune, and the resultant break up and reforming of Neptune's moons. It's unlikely that it was captured later, after the chaos settled down. It has a nearly circular orbit. Captured objects are expected to have eccentric orbits. A pity the object is so distant, it bears closer examination.


#6    MainerMikeBrown

MainerMikeBrown

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 205 posts
  • Joined:02 Sep 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maine, United States

Posted 17 July 2013 - 07:34 PM

The fact that the sunlight is so dim out by Neptune makes it so hard for us humans to discover new worlds such as this moon, which is so far away.  But nowadays, we're discovering them nonetheless.  I think it's exciting!


#7    Spacenut56

Spacenut56

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 506 posts
  • Joined:26 May 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spokane, Washington

Posted 18 July 2013 - 02:03 PM

View PostMainerMikeBrown, on 17 July 2013 - 07:34 PM, said:

The fact that the sunlight is so dim out by Neptune makes it so hard for us humans to discover new worlds such as this moon, which is so far away.  But nowadays, we're discovering them nonetheless.  I think it's exciting!
I agree. I just wonder how many more moons may be out there in both Jupiters and Saturns orbits?


#8    woopypooky

woopypooky

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 254 posts
  • Joined:26 Apr 2007

Posted 19 July 2013 - 10:39 AM

doubt the discovery is anything useful. even the moon itself is anything useful


#9    bison

bison

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,640 posts
  • Joined:13 Apr 2011

Posted 19 July 2013 - 01:41 PM

We might use it to learn how a tiny moon can defy the odds heavily against its survival, under the conditions this one is believed to have endured. Failing that, we might use this object to learn that it is not possible for a wholly natural object to have survived under these circumstances.

Edited by bison, 19 July 2013 - 01:46 PM.


#10    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,962 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 July 2013 - 02:30 PM

View Postbison, on 19 July 2013 - 01:41 PM, said:

We might use it to learn how a tiny moon can defy the odds heavily against its survival, under the conditions this one is believed to have endured.
Probably.

View Postbison, on 19 July 2013 - 01:41 PM, said:

Failing that, we might use this object to learn that it is not possible for a wholly natural object to have survived under these circumstances.
We might learn that "we don't fully understand therefore it must be artificial alien artefact" is an illogical jump, but most of us know that already.

If you want to suggest an alien origin for this moon please don't spend weeks slowly hijacking this topic, start a new one in the appropriate forum. Thank you.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#11    NatureBoff

NatureBoff

    SandersonHapgood

  • Banned
  • 3,491 posts
  • Joined:23 Oct 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

Posted 19 July 2013 - 03:04 PM

View Postbison, on 17 July 2013 - 03:38 PM, said:

The newly discovered little moon is an enigma. So small, it should have been swept up into a larger nearby moon during the episode of Triton's capture by Neptune, and the resultant break up and reforming of Neptune's moons. It's unlikely that it was captured later, after the chaos settled down. It has a nearly circular orbit. Captured objects are expected to have eccentric orbits. A pity the object is so distant, it bears closer examination.
There's a general enigma I believe in that 'shepherding moons' give a "gravitational kick" to one another and surrounding dust rings. Just from memory and a Prof Brian Cox programme of course. He didn't explain where the "extra" came from though..

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#12    bison

bison

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,640 posts
  • Joined:13 Apr 2011

Posted 19 July 2013 - 06:47 PM

View PostNatureBoff, on 19 July 2013 - 03:04 PM, said:

There's a general enigma I believe in that 'shepherding moons' give a "gravitational kick" to one another and surrounding dust rings. Just from memory and a Prof Brian Cox programme of course. He didn't explain where the "extra" came from though..
S/2004 N 1 is at about twice the distance from Neptune that it rings are, so is not a shepherding moon. it is quite close to being in orbital resonances with its neighboring moons, Larissa and Proteus.

Edited by bison, 19 July 2013 - 06:49 PM.


#13    paperdyer

paperdyer

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,014 posts
  • Joined:04 May 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina

  • "The place where optimism flourishes the most is the insane asylum."

Posted 19 July 2013 - 07:36 PM

I got this in an email today.  Not pertaining to neptune, but interesting.  May be worth posting.  Something I don't think I can do.

http://www.laborator...680011&type=cta


#14    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,962 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 July 2013 - 09:01 PM

View Postpaperdyer, on 19 July 2013 - 07:36 PM, said:

I got this in an email today.  Not pertaining to neptune, but interesting.
So why post it in a thread about Neptune?

View Postpaperdyer, on 19 July 2013 - 07:36 PM, said:

May be worth posting.
It is, which is why there is already a thread about it: Snow in an Infant Planetary System

View Postpaperdyer, on 19 July 2013 - 07:36 PM, said:

Something I don't think I can do.

http://www.laborator...680011&type=cta
You don't think you can post it despite the fact that you posted it. That has me more than a little puzzled.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#15    Ryu

Ryu

    Born to fail.

  • Member
  • 3,954 posts
  • Joined:17 Dec 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Where you'll never find me

  • Don't speak to me of "peace" while you are sharpening your blades.

Posted 19 July 2013 - 09:20 PM

It is amazing that bit by bit our knowledge of our solar system is being slowly rewritten as we discover more.

THIS is what I like seeing our resources channeled towards. Discovering things, not more wars.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users