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Solar System May Have Hidden Giant Planet

solar system planets tyche wise nasa

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29 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 01:46 PM

Up telescope! Search begins for giant new planet
Tyche may be bigger than Jupiter and orbit at the outer edge of the solar system


www.independent.co.uk said:

If you grew up thinking there were nine planets and were shocked when Pluto was demoted five years ago, get ready for another surprise. There may be nine after all, and Jupiter may not be the largest.

The hunt is on for a gas giant up to four times the mass of Jupiter thought to be lurking in the outer Oort Cloud, the most remote region of the solar system. The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.


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#2    Jacques Terreur

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 01:56 PM

wow, that would be a truly amazing find! I just hope the IAU sticks with the name and they don't call it "NIBIRU" ;)


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:00 PM

View PostJacques Terreur, on 25 July 2013 - 01:56 PM, said:

wow, that would be a truly amazing find! I just hope the IAU sticks with the name and they don't call it "NIBIRU" ;)
I can guarantee that the one name they WON'T give it will be Nibiru.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    Jeffertonturner

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:38 PM

I came in wondering how long it would be until someone said Nibiru.

Wow.

Cool story otherwise.

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#5    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:47 PM

View PostJeffertonturner, on 25 July 2013 - 02:38 PM, said:

I came in wondering how long it would be until someone said Nibiru.

Well so far it has only been mentioned in jest, but it is only a matter of time before someone tries to claim that the (so far totally hypothetical) Tyche is (the totally non-existent ) Nibiru, despite the fact that they have totally different (hypothetical) orbits.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#6    kannin

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:52 PM

planet x nonsense, the ones that believe it have to be joking somewhat, isnt there a story that life came to earth because nibiru crashed into this planet? really! ha! id rather hear spoon fed bull sh**** from martha stewart saying she never frauded anything.

amazing post though like jaques said that would be an extreamly amazing find

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#7    Spacenut56

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 07:53 PM

I wonder if it may be a rogue planet?


#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:10 PM

View PostSpacenut56, on 25 July 2013 - 07:53 PM, said:

I wonder if it may be a rogue planet?
A rogue planet is generally consider to be a planet not in orbit around a star so, by definition, if Tyche exists it is not a rogue planet.

However the article says this:

Quote

Whether it would become the new ninth planet would be decided by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The main argument against is that Tyche probably formed around another star and was later captured by the Sun's gravitational field.
So it may well have been a rogue planet in the past. Alternatively it may have been in orbit around another star which came close to the sun and was captured during that close encounter, if that is the case then it was never a rogue planet.

One thing is for sure, if it exists Tyche will be eagerly studied by astronomers for generations to come.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#9    kannin

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:20 PM

so interesting

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#10    ninjadude

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:25 PM

That article is from two years ago. The data most likely analyzed by now as they were waiting for April 2011. I seriously doubt there will be any massive planet found.

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#11    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:27 PM

View Postninjadude, on 25 July 2013 - 08:25 PM, said:

That article is from two years ago.
So it was. I totally missed that. It cropped up somewhere else today and I didn't notice that it was an old story.

Edited to add:

In fact there is a two year old topic on Tyche here: Search begins for giant new planet

I must be getting old, I generally remember if a subject has already been posted.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 25 July 2013 - 08:33 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#12    sepulchrave

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 10:59 PM

I also doubt there will be any planet found, but judging by the WISE site they are still analyzing the data and finding new things.

For example, just a few months ago they discovered a new star system only 6.5 light years from Earth.

So it is not impossible that a cold gas giant could still be hiding in the Oort cloud.


#13    Parsec

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM

Oh, if true this is huge (in all the senses)!

I ask for Waspie and Sepulchrave advice: if Tychee exists, being a giant gas so far from the Sun, which conditions could we find on its surface? I mean, being so big it's probably closer to a star than to a planet (it could even be a brown dwarf), so probably it could have internal heat, but being so far from the Sun, it could have very low temperatures on its surface (Pluto is on average 40 Kelvin). It could be similar to Neptune, but could it be possible that, given the conditions, it could be non gaseous but solid? Could it be theoretically possible that it could have a solid inner core, surrounded by a thick atmosphere?
Wow, thinking it could have originated in another star system brings so many variables that's mind blogging! Who knows how old is it, it could be older than our Sun (and that's very probable, if it had to travel through deep space)!


#14    Jacques Terreur

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:22 AM

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

Who knows how old is it, it could be older than our Sun (and that's very probable, if it had to travel through deep space)!


sorry guys,i am really interested in astronomy & space, but my knowledge is next to nothing. Is it really possible what i took out of this post? That massive planets break out of their star system and fly through deep space until some other star's gravity "catches" them??


#15    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:36 AM

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

Oh, if true this is huge (in all the senses)!

I ask for Waspie and Sepulchrave advice: if Tychee exists, being a giant gas so far from the Sun, which conditions could we find on its surface?
Being a gas giant it wont have a solid surface. The article says they expect it to look much like Jupiter and have a temperature of about -73oC, which is considerably warmer than Pluto.

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

I mean, being so big it's probably closer to a star than to a planet (it could even be a brown dwarf),
No, it's most definitely a planet. Even brown dwarfs are not considered true stars, but are sub-stars. Brown dwarfs are considerably hotter than planets, typically having a surface temperature temperature of 1000 K. They also have a minimum mass of around 13x Jupiter. If Tyche exists it is too cold and too small to be anything other than a planet.


View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

so probably it could have internal heat,
By internal heat I assume you mean it's surface temperature is driven by internal heat rather than from the Sun (after all the Earth has internal heat). That is almost certain. Jupiter Saturn and Neptune all generate more heat than they receive from the Sun.

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

but being so far from the Sun, it could have very low temperatures on its surface (Pluto is on average 40 Kelvin).

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

It could be similar to Neptune, but could it be possible that, given the conditions, it could be non gaseous but solid?
No, it wouldn't be a gas giant then.

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

Could it be theoretically possible that it could have a solid inner core, surrounded by a thick atmosphere?
In planets as large as Jupiter the pressure is so great at the centre that Hydrogen becomes solid. This is likely with Tyche even if it doesn't have a rocky core.

View PostParsec, on 26 July 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

Wow, thinking it could have originated in another star system brings so many variables that's mind blogging! Who knows how old is it, it could be older than our Sun (and that's very probable, if it had to travel through deep space)!
It's more likely to have been "stolen" from another star but it could still be older than the sun.

Parsec, virtually all of the answers I have given you are in the original article I linked to. Why not read that?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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