Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Best Pyramid threads?


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1    Dragonwind

Dragonwind

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 189 posts
  • Joined:23 Aug 2011

Posted 29 July 2013 - 04:20 AM

There's a lot of threads on Eygpt and the pyramids here. Wondering if anyone can point me towards some good practical ones? By practical I mean threads that discuss more realistic evidence on their construction and purpose. I'm not interested in aliens, giants and even mythology so much but the true functional engineering purpose.

Usually throughout history societies only ever engage in such large engineering projects to accomplish something that benefits the whole community, particularly water and energy (Yangze and Hoover dams, Roman aquaducts etc) so I tend to like theories that focus on realistic design planning such as the shafts under the pyramids, their relation to the water table and how the pyramids fit into the greater context of it's population around the Nile. I cannot see anything to do with tombs, I don't see any direct evidence of electricity production and the new age ideas of acoustic resonance seems a bit far fetched.

The purpose of the great pyramid I keep coming back to is water management, given the effort the pyramid builders went to with the great pyramid and its relationship with the Nile and Sphinx. They had an intimate knowledge of water hydraulogy, irrigation, navigation and a very sophisticated society.

But I don't know enough about problems they had with water such as access to clean water. The great pyramid is also usually the main focus...but I want to learn more about the other pyramids. What other pyramids also have similar shafts, tunnels and relationship to water?? It seems like they are rarely discussed as a whole.

Thanks!


#2    questionmark

questionmark

    Cinicus Magnus

  • Member
  • 35,318 posts
  • Joined:26 Jun 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greece and Des Moines, IA

  • In a flat world there is an explanation to everything.

Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:20 AM

Try these:

http://www.unexplain...mids built&st=0
http://www.unexplain...pic=226518&st=0

But as a general warning: there is a big heap of BoolKrappy to sift through in any of them.

A skeptic is a well informed believer and a pessimist a well informed optimist
The most dangerous views of the world are from those who have never seen it. ~ Alexander v. Humboldt
If you want to bulls**t me please do it so that it takes me more than a minute to find out

about me

#3    cladking

cladking

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,702 posts
  • Joined:06 Nov 2006
  • Location:Indiana

  • Tempus fugit.

Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:35 PM

View PostDragonwind, on 29 July 2013 - 04:20 AM, said:

There's a lot of threads on Eygpt and the pyramids here. Wondering if anyone can point me towards some good practical ones? By practical I mean threads that discuss more realistic evidence on their construction and purpose. I'm not interested in aliens, giants and even mythology so much but the true functional engineering purpose.

Usually throughout history societies only ever engage in such large engineering projects to accomplish something that benefits the whole community, particularly water and energy (Yangze and Hoover dams, Roman aquaducts etc) so I tend to like theories that focus on realistic design planning such as the shafts under the pyramids, their relation to the water table and how the pyramids fit into the greater context of it's population around the Nile. I cannot see anything to do with tombs, I don't see any direct evidence of electricity production and the new age ideas of acoustic resonance seems a bit far fetched.

The purpose of the great pyramid I keep coming back to is water management, given the effort the pyramid builders went to with the great pyramid and its relationship with the Nile and Sphinx. They had an intimate knowledge of water hydraulogy, irrigation, navigation and a very sophisticated society.

But I don't know enough about problems they had with water such as access to clean water. The great pyramid is also usually the main focus...but I want to learn more about the other pyramids. What other pyramids also have similar shafts, tunnels and relationship to water?? It seems like they are rarely discussed as a whole.

Thanks!

View PostDragonwind, on 29 July 2013 - 04:20 AM, said:

There's a lot of threads on Eygpt and the pyramids here. Wondering if anyone can point me towards some good practical ones? By practical I mean threads that discuss more realistic evidence on their construction and purpose. I'm not interested in aliens, giants and even mythology so much but the true functional engineering purpose.

Usually throughout history societies only ever engage in such large engineering projects to accomplish something that benefits the whole community, particularly water and energy (Yangze and Hoover dams, Roman aquaducts etc) so I tend to like theories that focus on realistic design planning such as the shafts under the pyramids, their relation to the water table and how the pyramids fit into the greater context of it's population around the Nile. I cannot see anything to do with tombs, I don't see any direct evidence of electricity production and the new age ideas of acoustic resonance seems a bit far fetched.

The purpose of the great pyramid I keep coming back to is water management, given the effort the pyramid builders went to with the great pyramid and its relationship with the Nile and Sphinx. They had an intimate knowledge of water hydraulogy, irrigation, navigation and a very sophisticated society.

But I don't know enough about problems they had with water such as access to clean water. The great pyramid is also usually the main focus...but I want to learn more about the other pyramids. What other pyramids also have similar shafts, tunnels and relationship to water?? It seems like they are rarely discussed as a whole.

Thanks!

I like to talk about why they were built but usually when I do it's considered OT.

Patrick Giles had one of the best threads about why here.

http://www.unexplain...topic=218422= rain  catch&st=0

I believe he found this site while researching this thread;

http://www.unexplain...topic=217110= rain  catch&st=0

Pretend you never saw this thread;

http://www.unexplain...topic=176965= rain  catch&st=0

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#4    Dragonwind

Dragonwind

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 189 posts
  • Joined:23 Aug 2011

Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:05 AM

Oh great thank! I will have a read of these. Cheers


#5    Dragonwind

Dragonwind

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 189 posts
  • Joined:23 Aug 2011

Posted 30 July 2013 - 08:52 AM

The threads seem to be more about water catchment. Pyramids collecting rain water or procuring water via condensation doesn't seem logical. I'm more interested in the tunnels, shafts and design of the chambers within and underneath the pyramid. A hydraulic pump to access the water table I am more open to...but then why such a big structure? Could easily build a greater number smaller structures that could do the same thing. If a mortuary temple why the trouble of designing such a bland kings chamber, why the worn box and purposeful shafts? A huge task just for a king? I need to research more on what is inside other pyramids. So many questions.

The actual construction of the pyramids and stone masonry I have less of a problem with as I have considerable experience in stone sculpture and have moved large stone blocks for landscaping via a few easy methods such as flip flopping, pivots and counter weights. Physics, time and effort.

Edited by Dragonwind, 30 July 2013 - 08:56 AM.


#6    cladking

cladking

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,702 posts
  • Joined:06 Nov 2006
  • Location:Indiana

  • Tempus fugit.

Posted 30 July 2013 - 03:25 PM

View PostDragonwind, on 30 July 2013 - 08:52 AM, said:

The threads seem to be more about water catchment. Pyramids collecting rain water or procuring water via condensation doesn't seem logical. I'm more interested in the tunnels, shafts and design of the chambers within and underneath the pyramid. A hydraulic pump to access the water table I am more open to...but then why such a big structure? Could easily build a greater number smaller structures that could do the same thing. If a mortuary temple why the trouble of designing such a bland kings chamber, why the worn box and purposeful shafts? A huge task just for a king? I need to research more on what is inside other pyramids. So many questions.

The actual construction of the pyramids and stone masonry I have less of a problem with as I have considerable experience in stone sculpture and have moved large stone blocks for landscaping via a few easy methods such as flip flopping, pivots and counter weights. Physics, time and effort.

It's the very size of the pyramids that makes it improbable the the intent of the builders was
simply to cap, distribute, or control water.  If G1 was a ram pump there would be no reason
to build it to a point nor so large. But it's quite obvios that water was a primary consideration
in the reason for building and quite probably the means of building.  Obviously a water source
during the valley flood would have been of extreme importance since this was peak growing
season and few crops could be grown elsewhere.  But this importance can not explain a 6 1/2
million ton pyramid lifted by the sweat of the human brow.

I fear what you seek has never before been sought so it is unmapped and unknown. Orthodoxy
turns a blind eye to caves and can only see ruins and deserts.  They are blind to water because
there is no means known for it being in the "uplands" where the pyramids are built. Vyse explored
a huge fissure adjacent to G1 in the 1830's but no further mapping or exploration has occured
since.  Yet there is extensive evidence for these natural features as well as man made connect-
ions.  Perhaps one of my favorites is an overflow at Saqqara that protects the walls from being
overtopped;

http://www.archaeoga...ticle_677_3.jpg

This one was only recently discovered.

People are greatly underestimating the amount of work, planning, resources, and anguish that
would be required to build these by the conventionally assumed means.  But they are hugely ov-
erestimating the amount of human effort that was actually used to construct them.  These were
simply a cakewalk comnpared to most peoples' gross underestimation of the effort they believe
was required. Since they were so easy to build it's even possible that they were pumps and the
builders topped them off to make them look "cool".  I find this far more plausiible than the tomb
theory.

We could quickly learn how these were built if we put even a little effort into it.  The amount of
effort probably wouldn't even exceed the effort the builders put into lifting a single stone. It's easy
to say you want answers but we can't muster the effort to do the equivalent of lifting a single stone.
People are afraid of the truth so don't look for it to happen anytime soon.


I just saw another new documentary (2013) about how they built the pyramids the other day. It
started with "they mustta used ramps" and the construction of a $10,000 ramp with nice concrete
filled PVC pipe rollers.  They even used a nice (little) two ton concrete "stone".  Despite these
virtually laboratory conditions they failed to move the stone more than a few feet but then pro-
nounced the experiment a roaring success.  Nevermind that the ancients lacked PVC pipe and
concrete to build ramps.  Never mind that they really didn't have the lumber needed to use rollers
to effectively move a stone around the earth at the equator 70 times; UPHILL!!!

Most of the new theories coming out about pyramid construction involve water and this will continue.
Most of the new evidence coming out involves water even though those finding it don't realize it.
It's been this way all along and this will continue as well.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#7    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 17,898 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 30 July 2013 - 09:34 PM

View PostDragonwind, on 30 July 2013 - 08:52 AM, said:

The threads seem to be more about water catchment. Pyramids collecting rain water or procuring water via condensation doesn't seem logical. I'm more interested in the tunnels, shafts and design of the chambers within and underneath the pyramid. A hydraulic pump to access the water table I am more open to...but then why such a big structure? Could easily build a greater number smaller structures that could do the same thing. If a mortuary temple why the trouble of designing such a bland kings chamber, why the worn box and purposeful shafts? A huge task just for a king? I need to research more on what is inside other pyramids. So many questions.

The actual construction of the pyramids and stone masonry I have less of a problem with as I have considerable experience in stone sculpture and have moved large stone blocks for landscaping via a few easy methods such as flip flopping, pivots and counter weights. Physics, time and effort.
You are very right. It is unlikely that the pyramids had anything to do with water. There are dozens of pyramids (most small ) in egypt, yet the Great Pyramid is the only one that people repeatedly go after to try to prove some water catching idea. Quite simply there were many, many other ways to do such water collecting in much easier ways.

The Great Pyramid is the only one that has atypical geometry inside, all other pyramids seem to follow the same general layout as a mastaba tomb. They have a decending tunnel and a room, or series of rooms under the body of the pyramid. All of which are concealed from the outside. Ironically it is beleived that most pyramid tombs were robbed within a generation of being completed by the very people who helped build them. And thus, most pyramids don't have anything in them... no mummys and no treasures.

Why the Great Pyramid is the way it is, I am not sure anyone actually understands. It probably would take time travel to figure out this one.

Edited by DieChecker, 30 July 2013 - 09:34 PM.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#8    The_Spartan

The_Spartan

    Spartan Forever!!!!

  • Member
  • 3,730 posts
  • Joined:31 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Abu Dhabi, UAE

  • Gravity is Arbitrary!!

Posted 01 August 2013 - 07:03 PM

What????
CK, why haven't you told dragonwind about your Geyser thingy??

"Wise men, when in doubt whether to speak or to keep quiet, give themselves the benefit of the doubt, and remain silent.-Napoleon Hill

Follow my stupid posts on Tumblr at Azrael's Ramblings

#9    cladking

cladking

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,702 posts
  • Joined:06 Nov 2006
  • Location:Indiana

  • Tempus fugit.

Posted 02 August 2013 - 12:08 AM

View PostThe_Spartan, on 01 August 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

What????
CK, why haven't you told dragonwind about your Geyser thingy??

He asked about water.

Besides if he reads the threads he'll figure it out pretty fast.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#10    Quaentum

Quaentum

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Joined:03 Aug 2012
  • Gender:Not Selected

  • The number of fringe believers is inversely proportional to what is left to discover in our world.

Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:31 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 30 July 2013 - 09:34 PM, said:

You are very right. It is unlikely that the pyramids had anything to do with water. There are dozens of pyramids (most small ) in egypt, yet the Great Pyramid is the only one that people repeatedly go after to try to prove some water catching idea. Quite simply there were many, many other ways to do such water collecting in much easier ways.

The Great Pyramid is the only one that has atypical geometry inside, all other pyramids seem to follow the same general layout as a mastaba tomb. They have a decending tunnel and a room, or series of rooms under the body of the pyramid. All of which are concealed from the outside. Ironically it is beleived that most pyramid tombs were robbed within a generation of being completed by the very people who helped build them. And thus, most pyramids don't have anything in them... no mummys and no treasures.

Why the Great Pyramid is the way it is, I am not sure anyone actually understands. It probably would take time travel to figure out this one.

If I were to guess I would say that the descending tunnel and room in the Great Pyramid was to play on robbers knowledge of how the pyramids were always built so they wouldn't think to look for an ascending passage and upper chamber.

AA LOGIC
They didn't use thousands of workers - oops forgot about the work camps
There's no evidence for ramps - You found one?...Bummer
Well we know they didn't use ancient tools to cut and shape the stones - Chisel marks?  Craps
I still say aliens built them!

#11    Quaentum

Quaentum

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Joined:03 Aug 2012
  • Gender:Not Selected

  • The number of fringe believers is inversely proportional to what is left to discover in our world.

Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:44 PM

View Postcladking, on 30 July 2013 - 03:25 PM, said:

People are greatly underestimating the amount of work, planning, resources, and anguish that
would be required to build these by the conventionally assumed means.  But they are hugely ov-
erestimating the amount of human effort that was actually used to construct them.  These were
simply a cakewalk comnpared to most peoples' gross underestimation of the effort they believe
was required. Since they were so easy to build it's even possible that they were pumps and the
builders topped them off to make them look "cool".  I find this far more plausiible than the tomb
theory.

Yes we have overestimated the manpower required.  So please explain to me why, if your theory is valid, it would require thousands of workers?  I ask because of the discovery of worker camps that would have held thousands of workers.

AA LOGIC
They didn't use thousands of workers - oops forgot about the work camps
There's no evidence for ramps - You found one?...Bummer
Well we know they didn't use ancient tools to cut and shape the stones - Chisel marks?  Craps
I still say aliens built them!

#12    cladking

cladking

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,702 posts
  • Joined:06 Nov 2006
  • Location:Indiana

  • Tempus fugit.

Posted 16 August 2013 - 10:03 PM

View PostQuaentum, on 16 August 2013 - 08:44 PM, said:

Yes we have overestimated the manpower required.  So please explain to me why, if your theory is valid, it would require thousands of workers?  I ask because of the discovery of worker camps that would have held thousands of workers.

This idea that the "workers' village" was large enough to house countless thousands of
men is simply ludicrous and a symptom of assuming the conclusion.  Once you "know" the
answer then you'll just pound all the square pegs into the round holes.  The village was tiny
and housed not only the workers but also suppies, kitchens, workrooms, etc.  By today's
standard it wasn't nearly large enough for even 1000 office workers who don't need sleep-
ing quarters and any of the comforts of home.  It's less than 1000' by 400'.

It was this small because it only normally housed some about 700 men, 650 women and a
couple hundred children.  These were the people who built the pyramid and most of them
were clerical, kitchen staff, and errand boys. It was as "large" as it was because it also had
to accomodate about 3500 quarry workers in inclement weather.  Normally these men lived
in temporary housing of one sort or another (mostly tents probably) but during extremely cold
weather, storms, and blowing debris they slept in the village.  Keep in mind this wouldn't be
as cramped as it sounds because they knew this would happen and the fascilities to accom-
odate them. It was primarily only the first three years that so many would even be working in
the quarry. The pyramid rose in a complicated equation but essentially the rate of increase
in height was remarkably steady meaning the numbers of workers in the quarry fell off rapid-
ly.  There might have been some mechanization in the quarry so it's possible there were even
fewer quarrymen.  These workers enjoyed many comforts as well since it's apparent they even
used water to keep the dust down.

There were no slaves and most of the workers were happy to be there.  This applied much less
to quarry workers and less still to the two most dangerous jobs on the pyramid.  Most of the py-
ramid workers actually won their jobs by lottery based on the hometown of the individuals who
had invented improved processes or devices.  They had numerous festivals and holidays and
partied like it was 1999 (BC).

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#13    Harte

Harte

    Supremely Educated Knower of Everything in Existence

  • Member
  • 8,975 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis

  • Skeptic

Posted 17 August 2013 - 09:19 AM

View PostThe_Spartan, on 01 August 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

What????
CK, why haven't you told dragonwind about your Geyser thingy??
Looks like he may be getting tired of talking about it.

See? Sometimes things do turn out for the best! LOL

Harte

I've consulted all the sages I could find in yellow pages but there aren't many of them. - The Alan Parsons Project
Most people would die sooner than think; in fact, they do so. - Bertrand Russell
Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong. - Thomas Jefferson
Giorgio's dying Ancient Aliens internet forum

#14    cladking

cladking

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,702 posts
  • Joined:06 Nov 2006
  • Location:Indiana

  • Tempus fugit.

Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:38 PM

View PostHarte, on 17 August 2013 - 09:19 AM, said:

Looks like he may be getting tired of talking about it.

See? Sometimes things do turn out for the best! LOL

Harte


To paraphrase John Paul Jones, "I have not yet begun to tire.".

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#15    Harte

Harte

    Supremely Educated Knower of Everything in Existence

  • Member
  • 8,975 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis

  • Skeptic

Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:13 PM

Quick, shoot some carbonated geyser water on him before he catches fire!

Harte

I've consulted all the sages I could find in yellow pages but there aren't many of them. - The Alan Parsons Project
Most people would die sooner than think; in fact, they do so. - Bertrand Russell
Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong. - Thomas Jefferson
Giorgio's dying Ancient Aliens internet forum




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users