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The Truth About Melchizedek


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#1    Ben Masada

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 07:36 PM

THE TRUTH ABOUT MELCHIZEDEK.

Here is a column which I consider will crack under the building of Christianity. Who was Melchizedek? This man was a pagan Canaanite king, who happened to be the king of Salem, ancient name for Jerusalem.

Abram had just returned from a battle with five kings, and, on his way to Betshevah, he paused in Jerusalem for a repast. He and his men were tired and weary of the military campaign. Melchizedek, afraid perhaps that Abram would take on him too and conquer Jerusalem out of his hands, immediately brought forth bread and wine to him and his troops. For Abram, it was a relieve. He didn't have to fight another king.

Now, please, I must remind you that I am reading from the originals in Hebrew and not from the KJV. Why would Melchizedek prefer to feed Abram and his army instead of fighting him? Because he, Abram, and not Melchizedek was the priest of God most High, whose seed would be of a nation of priests and kings. (Exo. 19:6; Isa. 61:6)

Then, as Melchizedek served the food and drink, he blessed Abram. Please focus on how he blessed Abram. "Blessed be Abram of God Most High." It means that Melchizedek would recongnize that Abram was the one Priest of God the Most High. Creator of the universe."
Then, for all the bread and wine, and that blessing of recognition of who Abram really was, Abram shared with him a tenth of the spoils taken from the kings in battle.

Now, let us check Psalm 110:4, which in the KJV says, "The Lord has sworn and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the order of Melchizedek." This is a Christian gloss plagiarized by Paul and grossly forged by the Church in the 4th Century under the excuse of pious forgery.

Here is what Psalm 110:4 says in the originals in Hebrew: "The Lord has sworn and will not relent, you are a priest forever; a rightful king by My decree." As you can see, it has nothing to do with king Melchizedek, king of Salem, but rather to David in the type level of interpretation, which points to the archetype level of Israel, the seed of Abraham as a nation of priests and kings. (Exo. 19:6; Isa. 61:6) Obviously, only the High Priest of the Most High would produce a generation of priests and kings through Israel.

Ben


#2    kannin

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 07:39 PM

good read, not going to lie im cunfuzzled

happiness can be found in the darkest of times, only if one remembers to turn on the light

#3    Gold Star

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 08:21 PM

Genesis 14:18 (Tanakh) "And King Melchizedek of Salem brought out bread and wine: he was a priest of God Most High." Abraham's  blessing came from God Most High through Melchizedek the priest. Abraham was never described as a priest in Genesis or any other part of the Old or New Testament. Actually, there is no connection between the Most High God (El Elyon) and Abraham anywhere other than in the episode with Melchizedek. The true god of Abraham was the god whom Abraham spoke with and who he made his covenant with - the LORD (under the name of God Almighty, Ex. 6:3).  There is no evidence that Melchizedek was pagan or was a Canaanite. His kingship originated from the acceptance of the inhabitants of Salem of his superior spirituality. Only three people are known to have functions with El Elyon: Melchizedek as priest, John the Baptist as prophet, and Christ as son.


#4    Ben Masada

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 06:10 PM

View Postkannin, on 30 July 2013 - 07:39 PM, said:

good read, not going to lie im cunfuzzled

Sorry but I don't know what you mean by "Not going to lie im cunfuzzled." Is it a foreign language?


#5    Ben Masada

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 06:15 PM

View PostGold Star, on 30 July 2013 - 08:21 PM, said:

Genesis 14:18 (Tanakh) "And King Melchizedek of Salem brought out bread and wine: he was a priest of God Most High." Abraham's  blessing came from God Most High through Melchizedek the priest. Abraham was never described as a priest in Genesis or any other part of the Old or New Testament. Actually, there is no connection between the Most High God (El Elyon) and Abraham anywhere other than in the episode with Melchizedek. The true god of Abraham was the god whom Abraham spoke with and who he made his covenant with - the LORD (under the name of God Almighty, Ex. 6:3).  There is no evidence that Melchizedek was pagan or was a Canaanite. His kingship originated from the acceptance of the inhabitants of Salem of his superior spirituality. Only three people are known to have functions with El Elyon: Melchizedek as priest, John the Baptist as prophet, and Christ as son.

It just happened that the text is in the Jewish Bible, written by Jewish Scribes, dictated by Jewish authors which is supposed to be interpreted in a Jewish way and not according to the preconceived notions of another religion. The KJV is a Christian translation. Does that make enough sense?


#6    Ever Learning

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 06:43 PM

View PostBen Masada, on 06 August 2013 - 06:15 PM, said:

It just happened that the text is in the Jewish Bible, written by Jewish Scribes, dictated by Jewish authors which is supposed to be interpreted in a Jewish way and not according to the preconceived notions of another religion. The KJV is a Christian translation. Does that make enough sense?
Its been a long time since we had a king james, thats an outdated bible, meaning your argument is also outdated. only a few christians hold to the king james because the thees and thous seem like they are more holy. the english standard version that goes to great pains going over all available scripture has most definitely included any of the scripture available to you. if you would like to debate this, please state the origins of your scripture.

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#7    Ben Masada

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 07:12 PM

View PostArmchair Educated, on 06 August 2013 - 06:43 PM, said:

Its been a long time since we had a king james, thats an outdated bible, meaning your argument is also outdated. only a few christians hold to the king james because the thees and thous seem like they are more holy. the english standard version that goes to great pains going over all available scripture has most definitely included any of the scripture available to you. if you would like to debate this, please state the origins of your scripture.

Yes, most definitely! I use: 1) The original in Hebrew; 2) The JPS translation; 3) The KJV ;  4) The NAB St. Joseph's edition because of the Apocrypha. I'll be glad to discuss the issue if you don't change your mind.


#8    Ever Learning

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 09:21 PM

View PostBen Masada, on 06 August 2013 - 07:12 PM, said:

Yes, most definitely! I use: 1) The original in Hebrew; 2) The JPS translation; 3) The KJV ;  4) The NAB St. Joseph's edition because of the Apocrypha. I'll be glad to discuss the issue if you don't change your mind.
lol so you have the original in hebrew. what would you class as the original. you have the original ones written by moses? or would would class a early copy as the original?

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#9    Bluefinger

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 12:57 PM

View PostArmchair Educated, on 06 August 2013 - 09:21 PM, said:


lol so you have the original in hebrew. what would you class as the original. you have the original ones written by moses? or would would class a early copy as the original?

And don't we have earlier copies pf the Septuagint than we do of the Hebrew Old Testament?

Shucks, even Jesus quotes the Septuagint.

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#10    Ben Masada

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 06:23 PM

View PostArmchair Educated, on 06 August 2013 - 09:21 PM, said:

lol so you have the original in hebrew. what would you class as the original. you have the original ones written by moses? or would would class a early copy as the original?

Yes, you are right. I guess I am classing an early copy in Hebrew as "originals."  Well, I suppose that what I have is more than enough to discuss any Biblical issue with you. And if you want to use the NT, you are equally welcome. I accept 20% of what the NT says about Jesus. The other 80% is made out of anti-Jewish interpolations with the intent to promote the Pauline policy of Replacement Theology.


#11    Philangeli

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 03:25 PM

I thought Melchisedech was a Priest of the Most High (Elyon) and that Abraham had to pay him a tithe of 10 per cent.

I'm not sure if this was even an actual event. Many stories in the Old Testament (e.g. Noah, Job, Jonah, Samson) were borrowed/plagiarized from earlier Sumerian, Canaanite and Egyptian sources.

Came across this extract from http://www.bibliotec...s/boulay04e.htm


THE BORROWED LEGENDS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

The oldest part of the Bible, Genesis Chapters 1 through 6, which deal with the antediluvian period, was not written down in its present form much earlier than 800 BC. On the other hand, most of the Sumerian stories and legends were composed and published about 2500 BC or not long afterwards. The cuneiform tablet versions reported events that took place before the Deluge as well as activities just after the event.

The uniqueness of the events of the Old Testament comes under critical scrutiny since there is nothing here that cannot be found in the ancient myths and literature of Mesopotamia and the land of Canaan. If the activities of Abraham can be dated to about 2100 BC, and his antecedents are in Mesopotamia, then all the events of the Old Testament which took place before Abraham and the Deluge must have had their origin among the indigenous people.

What is not often perceived is that the Jews had at their disposal a vast store of creation and other myths wholly unknown to us, from which they borrowed selectively. For instance, we know that the Eden of the Bible was located in the river delta region of Mesopotamia, and that the story of the creation of Adam is a Sumerian account. The story of the Ark, the Deluge and Noah came from Sumerian accounts. In fact, the story of the Deluge was not limited to the Middle East but was universally known.

There are also Ugaritic (northern Canaan) parallels to the Hebrew Bible. The story of Daniel was taken from a north Canaan poem dated as far back as 1500 BC. The Ugarit Epic of Keret deals with the capture of a bride of King Keret by a distant king. It later became the Helen of Troy motif. But more importantly, it is the source of the stories of Genesis 12 and 20 where twice Abraham had to get his wife Sarah back from the hands of other kings.

The story of Job comes from a Babylonian poem about a virtuous man named Tabu-utul-bel who was sorely afflicted for some inscrutable reason and tormented by the gods.

The story of Jonah has many origins and apparently was universal, for Hercules was swallowed by a whale at precisely the same place, Joppa. Persian legends tell of their hero Jamahyd who was devoured by a sea monster that later vomited him out safely upon the shore. A similar tale appears in India in the epic classic Samedev Bhatta where Saktedeva was swallowed by a fish and later escapes.
The story of Samson is so strange and foreign to Hebrew lore as to indicate that it was borrowed in toto from Canaanite mythology; in fact, his name is derived from Shamash, the Canaanite sun god who ruled Lebanon.
[Comment: As we know, Shamash equals Prince Utu of the Planet Nibiru, the same "god" as the Greek Sun-God Apollo. Prince Utu was in charge of the Sinai Spaceport and its satellite airport at Baalbek, Lebanon, under the command of Nibiruan Airfleet Commander Princess-Royal Inanna, the sister and secret lover of Prince Utu. See Lord Hellespontiacus.]
There are so many parallels that there is no question of contemporary borrowing by the Hebrews. How then did this influence penetrate the Bible so completely?
Sometime during the Second Millennium BC, the Babylonian script, language, and literature permeated the lands west of Mesopotamia. Babylonian had become the diplomatic language of the Middle East so that correspondence between princes of Syria, Phoenicia, and Palestine with their Egyptian overlords were carried out in Babylonia.
[Comment: This statement is corroborated by the research of Dr. Velikovsky. One might think of Babylonian as the "English of the Ancient World."]
Therefore, in order to learn the writing and language of the Babylonians, it is necessary for these peoples to study their literature and for this purpose texts were required. Among the tablets discovered at Tel-Amarna in Egypt were copies, in the form of school exercises, of the Babylonian stories of Ereshkigal, the Queen of the Underworld, and the story of Adapa, the mortal who was misled into refusing the food and water of immortality. So it is not unreasonable to assume that many of the Sumerians and Babylonian traditions, such as the stories of Creation and the Deluge, were known also to the Hebrews, or at least to their leaders.
When he left Ur in the valley of Mesopotamia, Abraham presumably brought these Sumerian traditions with him. His father Terah was a high priest in the government of Ur and would certainly have had an intimate knowledge of Sumerian culture.
It is therefore manifest that Sumerian tales of the gods of heaven and earth, the creation of Man, and the Deluge were the fountainhead from which nations of the ancient world drew their knowledge and beliefs.


Edited by Philangeli, 15 August 2013 - 03:26 PM.

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#12    Ben Masada

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 07:18 PM

View PostPhilangeli, on 15 August 2013 - 03:25 PM, said:

I thought Melchisedech was a Priest of the Most High (Elyon) and that Abraham had to pay him a tithe of 10 per cent.

I'm not sure if this was even an actual event. Many stories in the Old Testament (e.g. Noah, Job, Jonah, Samson) were borrowed/plagiarized from earlier Sumerian, Canaanite and Egyptian sources.

Came across this extract from http://www.bibliotec...s/boulay04e.htm


THE BORROWED LEGENDS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

The oldest part of the Bible, Genesis Chapters 1 through 6, which deal with the antediluvian period, was not written down in its present form much earlier than 800 BC. On the other hand, most of the Sumerian stories and legends were composed and published about 2500 BC or not long afterwards. The cuneiform tablet versions reported events that took place before the Deluge as well as activities just after the event.

The uniqueness of the events of the Old Testament comes under critical scrutiny since there is nothing here that cannot be found in the ancient myths and literature of Mesopotamia and the land of Canaan. If the activities of Abraham can be dated to about 2100 BC, and his antecedents are in Mesopotamia, then all the events of the Old Testament which took place before Abraham and the Deluge must have had their origin among the indigenous people.

What is not often perceived is that the Jews had at their disposal a vast store of creation and other myths wholly unknown to us, from which they borrowed selectively. For instance, we know that the Eden of the Bible was located in the river delta region of Mesopotamia, and that the story of the creation of Adam is a Sumerian account. The story of the Ark, the Deluge and Noah came from Sumerian accounts. In fact, the story of the Deluge was not limited to the Middle East but was universally known.

There are also Ugaritic (northern Canaan) parallels to the Hebrew Bible. The story of Daniel was taken from a north Canaan poem dated as far back as 1500 BC. The Ugarit Epic of Keret deals with the capture of a bride of King Keret by a distant king. It later became the Helen of Troy motif. But more importantly, it is the source of the stories of Genesis 12 and 20 where twice Abraham had to get his wife Sarah back from the hands of other kings.

The story of Job comes from a Babylonian poem about a virtuous man named Tabu-utul-bel who was sorely afflicted for some inscrutable reason and tormented by the gods.

The story of Jonah has many origins and apparently was universal, for Hercules was swallowed by a whale at precisely the same place, Joppa. Persian legends tell of their hero Jamahyd who was devoured by a sea monster that later vomited him out safely upon the shore. A similar tale appears in India in the epic classic Samedev Bhatta where Saktedeva was swallowed by a fish and later escapes.
The story of Samson is so strange and foreign to Hebrew lore as to indicate that it was borrowed in toto from Canaanite mythology; in fact, his name is derived from Shamash, the Canaanite sun god who ruled Lebanon.
[Comment: As we know, Shamash equals Prince Utu of the Planet Nibiru, the same "god" as the Greek Sun-God Apollo. Prince Utu was in charge of the Sinai Spaceport and its satellite airport at Baalbek, Lebanon, under the command of Nibiruan Airfleet Commander Princess-Royal Inanna, the sister and secret lover of Prince Utu. See Lord Hellespontiacus.]
There are so many parallels that there is no question of contemporary borrowing by the Hebrews. How then did this influence penetrate the Bible so completely?
Sometime during the Second Millennium BC, the Babylonian script, language, and literature permeated the lands west of Mesopotamia. Babylonian had become the diplomatic language of the Middle East so that correspondence between princes of Syria, Phoenicia, and Palestine with their Egyptian overlords were carried out in Babylonia.
[Comment: This statement is corroborated by the research of Dr. Velikovsky. One might think of Babylonian as the "English of the Ancient World."]
Therefore, in order to learn the writing and language of the Babylonians, it is necessary for these peoples to study their literature and for this purpose texts were required. Among the tablets discovered at Tel-Amarna in Egypt were copies, in the form of school exercises, of the Babylonian stories of Ereshkigal, the Queen of the Underworld, and the story of Adapa, the mortal who was misled into refusing the food and water of immortality. So it is not unreasonable to assume that many of the Sumerians and Babylonian traditions, such as the stories of Creation and the Deluge, were known also to the Hebrews, or at least to their leaders.
When he left Ur in the valley of Mesopotamia, Abraham presumably brought these Sumerian traditions with him. His father Terah was a high priest in the government of Ur and would certainly have had an intimate knowledge of Sumerian culture.
It is therefore manifest that Sumerian tales of the gods of heaven and earth, the creation of Man, and the Deluge were the fountainhead from which nations of the ancient world drew their knowledge and beliefs.


Know something Phinlangell? You could be right on every thing you have typed above. The writers of the Bible might very well have paraphrased many of other texts in order to teach a moral point. It think that's allowed in the literature of a people from another.


#13    Philangeli

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 07:44 AM

View PostBen Masada, on 20 August 2013 - 07:18 PM, said:

Know something Phinlangell? You could be right on every thing you have typed above. The writers of the Bible might very well have paraphrased many of other texts in order to teach a moral point. It think that's allowed in the literature of a people from another.

Of course, everything is allowed in literature; whether it is historical fact or not, is another matter. I don't recall ever seeing a label stuck on the cover of the Old Testament or Torah, saying, 'Warning! Some of the incidents in this book may not have actually occurred'.

The point I would like to make is that there is a lot of spiritual metaphor in these works. That's what we should be looking for - the deeper spiritual meaning which can enrich our lives - not worrying about differing, superficial Jewish and Christian interpretations of who Melchisedech, Abraham, etc. were. Don't you think life is a bit too short for that?

There are actually professors working in the Middle East, making a life career of  trying to prove that Noah's Ark is perched on top of a mountain somewhere, or trying to prove that Yahweh actually parted the Red Sea for the Israelites to pass through. What is that all about?

Edited by Philangeli, 21 August 2013 - 07:50 AM.

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#14    Ben Masada

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 06:59 PM

View PostPhilangeli, on 21 August 2013 - 07:44 AM, said:

Of course, everything is allowed in literature; whether it is historical fact or not, is another matter. I don't recall ever seeing a label stuck on the cover of the Old Testament or Torah, saying, 'Warning! Some of the incidents in this book may not have actually occurred'.

The point I would like to make is that there is a lot of spiritual metaphor in these works. That's what we should be looking for - the deeper spiritual meaning which can enrich our lives - not worrying about differing, superficial Jewish and Christian interpretations of who Melchisedech, Abraham, etc. were. Don't you think life is a bit too short for that?

There are actually professors working in the Middle East, making a life career of  trying to prove that Noah's Ark is perched on top of a mountain somewhere, or trying to prove that Yahweh actually parted the Red Sea for the Israelites to pass through. What is that all about?

Knowledge. Just for the joy of knowledge. That's what life is all about.





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