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What do you think about Kneipp Cure?


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#1    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 12:33 PM

Bavarian priest and one of the founders of the naturopathic medicine movement. He is most commonly associated with the "Kneipp Cure" form of hydrotherapy- the application of water through various methods, temperatures and pressures which he claimed to have therapeutic or healing effects.
In Norway, he is mostly known for his wholemeal bread recipe. Kneippbrød is the most commonly eaten bread in Norway.

He is father of :

Naturopathy, or naturopathic medicine, is a form of alternative medicine based on a belief in vitalism, which posits that a special energy called vital energy or vital force guides bodily processes such as metabolism, reproduction, growth, and adaptation.[1] Naturopathy favors a holistic approach with non-invasive treatment and generally avoids the use of surgery and drugs.[2] Among naturopaths, complete rejection of biomedicine and modern science is common.The term "naturopathy" is derived from Greek and Latin, and literally translates as "nature disease"

Homeopathy belong to Naturopathy-

Homeopathy-alternative medicine originated in 1796 by Samuel Hahnemann. German physician Hahnemann believed that the underlying causes of disease were phenomena that he termed miasms, and that homeopathic remedies addressed these. The remedies are prepared by repeatedly diluting a chosen substance in alcohol or distilled water, followed by forceful striking on an elastic body, called succussion. Scientific research has repeatedly found homeopathic remedies ineffective and their postulated mechanisms of action implausible. Modern advocates of homeopathy have suggested that "water has a memory" – that during mixing and succussion, the substance leaves an enduring effect on the water, perhaps a "vibration", and this produces an effect on the patient. This notion has no scientific support. Trials showed at best no effect beyond placebo.

So is Kneipp cure Placebo effect?

Placebo-treatment for a disease or other medical condition intended to deceive the recipient. Sometimes patients given a placebo treatment will have a perceived or actual improvement in a medical condition, a phenomenon commonly called the placebo effect.
In one common placebo procedure, however, a patient is given an inert pill, told that it may improve his/her condition, but not told that it is in fact inert. Such an intervention may cause the patient to believe the treatment will change his/her condition; and this belief may produce a subjective perception of a therapeutic effect, causing the patient to feel their condition has improved — or an actual improvement in their condition. This phenomenon is known as the placebo effect. The placebo effect points to the importance of perception and the brain's role in physical health.
The brain is also involved in less-studied ways upon nonanalgesic placebo effects:
Parkinson's disease: Placebo relief is associated with the release of dopamine in the brain.[90]
Depression: Placebos reducing depression affect many of the same areas that are activated by antidepressants with the addition of the prefrontal cortex[91][92]
Caffeine: Placebo-caffeinated coffee causes an increase in bilateral dopamine release in the thalamus.[93]



Source:wiki

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#2    Rafterman

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 01:48 PM

Placebo effect - yep.

Complete bull**** - yep.

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#3    brlesq1

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:11 PM

I don't know anything about Kneipp, but I do know that being in a hot tub, sitting in front of a jet, makes the pain in my lower back go away. Isn't that the application of water to a part of the body?

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#4    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 10:02 PM

View Postbrlesq1, on 21 August 2013 - 08:11 PM, said:

I don't know anything about Kneipp, but I do know that being in a hot tub, sitting in front of a jet, makes the pain in my lower back go away. Isn't that the application of water to a part of the body?

Yes it is. Sadly I know nothing about Kneip theraphy for any connections.

Edited by Melo, 21 August 2013 - 10:02 PM.

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#5    Ryu

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 10:27 PM

Well..placebo or not, nothing bets have a torrent of warm water running over your back. Always eases my back pains at least for awhile.

I heard that my grandmother, who lived in Switzerland, sometimes visited the mineral laden hot springs and it always seemed to do good for her.

At this point I don't care if it is just imaginary, a hot soak feels great.


#6    DecoNoir

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 10:32 PM

I'd suspect the heat from the jet may loosen your back muscles, or at least relax them enough to relieve pressure from the nerves.

Placibo or not, if it works, roll with it!

Edited by DecoNoir, 21 August 2013 - 10:33 PM.

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#7    The_Student

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 10:06 PM

This kind of treatment was pretty common in the Victorian era, spas and bathing resorts were very popular whether they did any medical good or not.


#8    doctorozone

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:25 PM

I'm a naturopathic physician with a great many years experience in the use of hydrotherapy, including many of Kniepp's methods. We closely monitored our patients after these treatments and found objective evidence of improved health. Is there a placebo effect. Of course there is. You can say that about anything the patient believes in. Is that the only effect attributed to hydrotherapy? I seriously doubt it. We are approximately 75% water, so why wouldn't water therapies be kind to us?


#9    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:04 AM

View Postdoctorozone, on 23 August 2013 - 10:25 PM, said:

I'm a naturopathic physician with a great many years experience in the use of hydrotherapy, including many of Kniepp's methods. We closely monitored our patients after these treatments and found objective evidence of improved health. Is there a placebo effect. Of course there is. You can say that about anything the patient believes in. Is that the only effect attributed to hydrotherapy? I seriously doubt it. We are approximately 75% water, so why wouldn't water therapies be kind to us?

Hi and welcome to UM!

Yes we are mostly water and parasites. Very well said.

Big Bad Voodoo

Edited by Big Bad Voodoo, 24 August 2013 - 10:04 AM.

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."




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