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Ancient Aliens

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#1741    scorpiosonic

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:16 AM

Not ready to tackle all 116 pgs, but I've read the last few pgs. anyway.

On AA Theorists: Are they true-believers, or just looking to sell books, etc?

Plausability just doesn't seem to matter to them; IF something can't imm. be explained in a logical and scientific manner, then it automatically MUST BE A :alien: ! ("And the answer is YES."  :D )
And NO monument, artifact, myth, legend, ETC. is safe from their scrutiny. They have no problem twisting the facts, or just ignoring them completely. Even more amazing, many ppl buy into their theories hook-line-and sinker, (and buy their books).

EVD studied the Nasca lines from the air and determined some of them are landing strips....I'll admit some do actually look like landing strips, (I don't believe they are) BUT, he's forgetting his own 'theory' in this process. ANY long-distance space-travelers would've surely had a craft w/ vertical take off/landing capabilities. (And since the Spanish records don't mention air balloons, the natives couldn't possibly have had them!)

Cris Dunn and Childress, (DHC) are quite a pair: did Cris even bother to test the salt lining in the Queen's chamber for hydrated zinc before/after coming up w/ his half-baked theory on the Pyramid being used to produce Hydrogen??? (And then used for WHAT? He said something about the Q's chamber resonating in this machines operation. :cry: )

You'd think being a machinist, Cris would've schooled DHC on the proper use of a square before he went on camera @ Puma Punku telling us that this stone block was perfectly square. DHC tried and tried, but anyone w/ one good eye could see something was amiss as he set, and then adjusted his square to try and prove his point. (IF the angle of the block was say 80 deg, why not just tell us so?)

I could go on and on, but......tomorrow's another day. :sleepy:


#1742    Noteverythingisaconspiracy

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:31 AM

View Postscorpiosonic, on 18 January 2014 - 08:34 AM, said:

Maybe it didn't start out as a plan, (written in stone :D ) but the location became THE place to build after Khufu's was built.

Possibly also pragmatic, the 'pyramid-building system' was basically set-up and ready to go on to the next one

That actually makes a lot of sense.
Why not use the facilities that are allready there.

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#1743    Kaa-Tzik

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:35 AM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 18 January 2014 - 05:32 AM, said:

Kaa-Tzik, I'm not sure what you're saying about experience, but I fear my post wasn't sufficiently clear. In no way did I mean to imply that you were arguing in favor of some wacko fringe idea, so I apologize if that's how it read.

Can we definitively prove or disprove a unified plan at Giza? "Definitive" is the operative term, so with that said, you're correct that I cannot dismiss it outright. In rereading my thread I see I started off overly confident and ended in a more reasonable way when I said that the idea is not plausible. That's not the same thing as impossible but stresses the degree of likelihood, which I personally am confident is not likely.

I say this because of the salient points in my previous thread: both the nature of pyramid building per each king's reign and the disruption of building activity at Giza after Khufu's reign. To embrace some sort of unified plan, we would have to imagine that Khufu gave voice to the idea and it was promptly forgotten, when the next two kings built elsewhere. We would have to wait for Khafre's ascension to the throne to entertain a unified plan. Perhaps something emerged by that time, and one way to view it is the positioning of Khafre's and Menkaure's pyramids in relation to Khufu's: the southeast corners of each of the three primary pyramids describe a line pointing straight northeast to the ancient cultic site of Heliopolis (now mostly hidden by Cairo's modern sprawl). Numerous Egyptologists have entertained this idea and I myself find it interesting, but not entirely convincing. When viewing the topography of Giza, Khafre and Menkaure built their pyramids on the only spots left which were well suited to the erection of colossal monuments. I see that as probably more relevant, but one cannot outright dismiss the alignment with Heliopolis. No one can.

I've droned on long enough, but my apologies if it seemed I was misrepresenting you. Honestly, it wasn't my intent. You deserve more credit than that.

Once again, aliens were involved in none of this. (And no, Harte, I don't mean Nubian aliens. And yes, I used the word "erection." He he.) :alien:
My post was probably too long.....

On experience I meant that it is relatavistic in that one persons idea of how much experience is enough, can differ from anothers.

On the "plan", I don't, as you understand, posit some great all encompassing plan that sucessive kings have followed, more of a general idea to put X there and Y somewhere else. I don't think it was all done in a totaly haphazard way. Probably needs another thread, but this subject, as I intimated, has been damaged by the fringe using the idea of a plan to "proove" their theories, so any idea put forward for any sort of plan, no matter how vague, plays into the hands of those absolutely needing there to have been a plan, or their theories crash and burn. I don't see any "stars on the ground" at Giza, but, as you say, an alignment with Heliopolis is certainly a possibility, and this view of the setting Sun at one of the equinoxes between Khafre and Khufu over the Sphinx temple, but there is no obvious place to watch this from as the modern Cairo sits on any notional veiwing point, if there was one of course, and without drawing lines on a map to check, some way south of Heliopolis, but further north than Memphis. Pity about Cairo, perhaps it could be moved out of the way so we can see what is underneath :)

Edited by Kaa-Tzik, 18 January 2014 - 09:37 AM.


#1744    third_eye

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 10:26 AM

Much is ignored and not presently made importance of the Pyramid compounds and immediate surrounding foundation ... and that is one of the missing compounding element for a proper evaluation regarding the possibility that the plateau is a full fledged unified plan ... the foundations correlates to a singular scheme but not enough is known to begin an educated examination of this possibility ~

~

View Postkmt_sesh, on 18 January 2014 - 05:32 AM, said:


~snip

When viewing the topography of Giza, Khafre and Menkaure built their pyramids on the only spots left which were well suited to the erection of colossal monuments. I see that as probably more relevant, but one cannot outright dismiss the alignment with Heliopolis.

~snip


Hi Boss ..
I've been reading that  there are many opinions from the civil engineering fraternity that the current sites of the subsequent structures after Khufu is not as singularly suited as was believed before ... of course topography today is much more defined than the days of yore ...


Quote

Last came Menkaure (min-KAW-ray), who was probably Khafre's son. His pyramid was by far the smallest of the three Great Pyramids, standing only 218 feet (66 meters). The Pyramid of Khafre, by contrast, was only nine feet, or three meters, shorter than that of Cheops, and in many photographs it appears taller because it sits on higher ground.

Indeed, today it actually is taller because the limestone facing has been removed from the earlier and taller Pyramid of Cheops. Originally all three pyramids were covered in a smooth limestone finish, so that they gleamed in the desert sun. However, later conquerors of Egypt stripped away these coverings. All that remains is a small portion of limestone on Khafre's pyramid—near the top, where it would have been hardest to reach. Because it still has its covering, the Pyramid of Khafre is actually taller than its neighbor.



Quote

In March 2002, we made a curious discovery while hiking up along the plateau in Giza. In the Southeastern section, far out in the desert, we came across a trench around 1.5 meters / 4.9 feet wide, leading off into the distance. Puzzled, we followed it for some distance until we came upon a massive wall at the edge of the desert facing Cairo!

...

After returning to Switzerland, I learned that no one had heard that a huge concrete wall was being constructed along the far perimeter of the Giza district. Our information was new even to the renowned researcher of religion and history, Professor James Hurtak, who had also personally conducted archeological research in Egypt. He was entirely unaware of the wall construction.



Quote

Construction

Like the Great Pyramid, a rock outcropping was used in the core. Due to the slope of the plateau, the northwest corner was cut 10 m (33 ft) out of the rock subsoil and the southeast corner is built up.
The pyramid is built of horizontal courses. The stones used at the bottom are very large, but as the pyramid rises, the stones become smaller, becoming only 50 cm (20 in) thick at the apex. The courses are rough and irregular for the first half of its height but a narrow band of regular masonry is clear in the midsection of the pyramid. At the northwest corner of the pyramid, the bedrock was fashioned into steps.[8] Casing stones cover the top third of the pyramid, but the pyramidion and part of the apex are missing.
The bottom course of casing stones was made out of pink granite but the remainder of the pyramid was cased in Tura Limestone. Close examination reveals that the corner edges of remaining casing stones are not completely straight, but are staggered by a few millimeters. One theory is that this is due to settling from seismic activity. An alternative theory postulates that the slope on the blocks was cut to shape before being placed due to the limited working space towards the top of the pyramid.[9]

Posted Image

the compound ~


I love this one ... "Close examination reveals that the corner edges of remaining casing stones are not completely straight, but are staggered by a few millimeters." :lol:


The ground level wasn't sufficiently flat but the surrounding compound and connective pathways built is defined to be such with greater work and effort to have made it so ....

~

Edited by third_eye, 18 January 2014 - 10:56 AM.

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#1745    questionmark

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

View PostHarte, on 18 January 2014 - 12:42 AM, said:

This magic fuel might take a while, but cars that drive themselves are already here.  You'll be riding in them in 20 years or so, if you're still alive.

When you die, let me know what it was like to ride in a car no one is driving as i doubt I'll be around for it.

Harte

Doubt it, they been promising that since the 50s.

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#1746    Harte

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 05:18 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 18 January 2014 - 11:46 AM, said:

Doubt it, they been promising that since the 50s.
Sometimes, promises are kept.

Frankfurt Auto Show: Mercedes shows off fully autonomous S-Class, production cars coming by 2020:

Quote

The truly self-driving car will be reality by 2020. So automakers and suppliers are saying in the wake of the huge Frankfurt Auto Show. The most prominent was the Mercedes-Benz S500 Intelligent Drive research vehicle, which a month earlier retraced the first road trip, 103 km (64 miles), taken by the first passenger car in 1888 (a Benz, of course). The breadth of players involved in autonomous driving shows how big, and serious, self-driving has become: Nokia, IBM, Continental, and virtually all the world’s top automakers are involved, and of course Google.

The most outspoken, or quotable, executive on autonomous driving was Carlos Ghosn, the CEO of Nissan, who pushed Nissan into electric cars such as the Nissan Leaf and now wants to do the same thing with self-drivers. “In 2020 all the problems that we have in allowing autonomous driving will be solved,” Ghosn told reporters. He went on to say they would allow older drivers to keep driving and young drivers to start driving at earlier ages.
Source: ExtremeTech

Harte

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Giorgio's dying Ancient Aliens internet forum

#1747    questionmark

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 05:24 PM

View PostHarte, on 18 January 2014 - 05:18 PM, said:

Sometimes, promises are kept.

Frankfurt Auto Show: Mercedes shows off fully autonomous S-Class, production cars coming by 2020:

Source: ExtremeTech

Harte

And we still are where we were in the 50s, and at what will be the largest obstacle to the introduction to an automated automobile: The thing cannot react to what was not programmed into it, or in plain English: It lacks creativity and therefore cannot escape unforeseen dangers.

It is quite easy to build something that slavishly follows a road, quite something else to react accordingly if suddenly a ball starts rolling over it (which mean that a child could follow).

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#1748    bendigger0

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:32 PM

I guess i'm just a stupid fool... i really enjoyed all of the Ancient Aliens shows.  Where else would i learn about these questions?  What's wrong with questioning the origin of the Sumerian culture, or exploring the genesis of petroglyphs?  There seems to be some sort of competition here to see who can opine the most denigrating criticisms.


#1749    seeder

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:35 PM

View Postbendigger0, on 18 January 2014 - 06:32 PM, said:

I guess i'm just a stupid fool... i really enjoyed all of the Ancient Aliens shows.  Where else would i learn about these questions?  What's wrong with questioning the origin of the Sumerian culture, or exploring the genesis of petroglyphs?  There seems to be some sort of competition here to see who can opine the most denigrating criticisms.

Good for you to have enjoyed them all, now ...see the same (short vids) explain better than the AA series did - whats actually going on  :tu:


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#1750    Gaden

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:52 PM

View Postbendigger0, on 18 January 2014 - 06:32 PM, said:

I guess i'm just a stupid fool... i really enjoyed all of the Ancient Aliens shows.  Where else would i learn about these questions?  What's wrong with questioning the origin of the Sumerian culture, or exploring the genesis of petroglyphs?  There seems to be some sort of competition here to see who can opine the most denigrating criticisms.

It's one thing to question, I'm all for that, It's quite another to lie about your "evidence" and conclusions. People like to say they have a right to question athorities' conclusions, (which I totally agree they do) and yet, never seem to question these guys. I just wonder why that is?

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, I just can't get my head that far up my butt

#1751    Harte

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:54 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 18 January 2014 - 05:24 PM, said:

And we still are where we were in the 50s, and at what will be the largest obstacle to the introduction to an automated automobile: The thing cannot react to what was not programmed into it, or in plain English: It lacks creativity and therefore cannot escape unforeseen dangers.
Quite so.

But a new paradigm is already emerging:

Quote

Internet of Things (IoT) is an integrated part of Future Internet and could be defined as a dynamic global network infrastructure with self configuring capabilities based on standard and interoperable communication protocols where physical and virtual ‘things’ have identities, physical attributes, and virtual personalities and use intelligent interfaces, and are seamlessly integrated into the information network. In the Internet of Things, ‘things’ are expected to become active participants in business, information and social processes where they are enabled to interact and communicate among themselves and with the environment by exchanging data and information ‘sensed’ about the environment, while reacting autonomously to the ‘real/physical world’ events and influencing it by running processes that trigger actions and create services with or without direct human intervention. Interfaces in the form of services facilitate interactions with these ‘smart things’ over the Internet, query and change their state and any information associated with them, taking into account security and privacy issues
The Internet of Things

View Postquestionmark, on 18 January 2014 - 05:24 PM, said:

It is quite easy to build something that slavishly follows a road, quite something else to react accordingly if suddenly a ball starts rolling over it (which mean that a child could follow).
That's always been the problem, true enough. However, the demonstrations of these vehicles are forced to "slavishly" follow a road due to the absence of any overall system of self-control.

Such a system is being developed today, as part of the internet of things..
Thus the prediction at the auto show concerning 2020 and my own of 20 years hence.

It could take a century before such a system could be developed that would take you from your own driveway to any singular place.  In the meantime, such automation would be used on main streets and highways/interstates, with drivers switching to "manual" at the edges of the zones of control.

Harte

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#1752    scorpiosonic

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:54 PM

View Postbendigger0, on 18 January 2014 - 06:32 PM, said:

I guess i'm just a stupid fool... i really enjoyed all of the Ancient Aliens shows.  Where else would i learn about these questions?  What's wrong with questioning the origin of the Sumerian culture, or exploring the genesis of petroglyphs?  There seems to be some sort of competition here to see who can opine the most denigrating criticisms.

View PostGaden, on 18 January 2014 - 06:52 PM, said:

It's one thing to question, I'm all for that, It's quite another to lie about your "evidence" and conclusions. People like to say they have a right to question authorities' conclusions, (which I totally agree they do) and yet, never seem to question these guys. I just wonder why that is?

Not saying anyone is stupid for watching the programs, (I do) at least you get to see these sites as most of us probably won't get to visit the majority of them like Georgio and co. do.

Like they said in the 60's, 'question authority' and as well we should, BUT it's a very good idea to get your facts straight first! (Esp. when promoting theories as radical as AA's.)

When Georgio says things like, "the Great Pyramid was built anonymously, there are NO hieroglyphs anywhere..." he leaves himself open to criticisms, and they are well-deserved. Some of us do question them, but it seems their fans take it ALL in without question.

Edited by scorpiosonic, 18 January 2014 - 08:56 PM.


#1753    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:02 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 18 January 2014 - 05:24 PM, said:

And we still are where we were in the 50s, and at what will be the largest obstacle to the introduction to an automated automobile: The thing cannot react to what was not programmed into it, or in plain English: It lacks creativity and therefore cannot escape unforeseen dangers.

It is quite easy to build something that slavishly follows a road, quite something else to react accordingly if suddenly a ball starts rolling over it (which mean that a child could follow).
FWIW computer games are the lead in that "AI creativity", case in point the upcoming Alien: Isolation game, the Alien in that is, if not intelligent, then extremely adaptable. It'll change it's route and hunting pattern between missions and based on the player's actions (ie it'll start hiding in vents if the player uses the vents a lot to get around). Still not as smart as "seeing a ball and knowing "watch out, kids might follow".

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#1754    toast

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:09 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 18 January 2014 - 05:24 PM, said:

The thing cannot react to what was not programmed into it, or in plain English: It lacks creativity and therefore cannot escape unforeseen dangers.

:whistle:



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#1755    Witchygirl94

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 12:35 AM

I think AA has a few good points, Most of it is stupid though.






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