Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Free-floating planets may be born free

exoplanets rogue planets rosette nebula

  • Please log in to reply
42 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 31,158 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 02 September 2013 - 10:48 PM

Free-floating planets may be born free


Chalmers University of Technology said:

Tiny, round, cold clouds in space have all the right characteristics to form planets with no parent star. New observations, made with Chalmers University of Technology telescopes, show that not all free-floating planets were thrown out of existing planetary systems. They can also be born free.

​Previous research has shown that there may be as many as 200 billion free-floating planets in our galaxy, the Milky Way. Until now scientists have believed that such “rogue planets”, which don’t orbit around a star, must have been ejected from existing planetary systems.

New observations of tiny dark clouds in space point out another possibility: that some free-floating planets formed on their own.  

Posted Image Read more...


"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#2    Realm

Realm

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,917 posts
  • Joined:29 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere in our spiral galaxy

  • "The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."
    Albert Einstein

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:08 PM

Wow, 28 planets for every person on the earth, just in our milky way.


#3    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:20 PM

Has anyone done any calculations on the chances of one entering our solar system?  Since over several billion years it seems the system has had no such encounters with other stars, I tend to think that the galaxy is so big that in spite of all the rogue planets that probably exist we are nevertheless fairly safe.


#4    spacecowboy342

spacecowboy342

    Traveler of both time and space

  • Member
  • 4,105 posts
  • Joined:22 Aug 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

  • I shall now proceed to entangle the entire area

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:32 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 02 September 2013 - 11:20 PM, said:

Has anyone done any calculations on the chances of one entering our solar system?  Since over several billion years it seems the system has had no such encounters with other stars, I tend to think that the galaxy is so big that in spite of all the rogue planets that probably exist we are nevertheless fairly safe.
I agree. There is probably a small statistical chance, but I would worry more about asteroids and super volcanoes. And Gamma ray bursts. And supernovae. Man is the universe a dangerous place or what?


#5    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,302 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:35 PM

That is incredible. :tu:

Perhaps we'll eventually be able to image these planets and go out looking to visit some.

I've read that if these extra-solar planets have a lot of radioactives, they could keep a molten core and thus provide heat and an atmosphere to the surface and thus provide energy for Life to develeop. So life could develop without even a star being present.

I've also read that there may be more rocky planets hidden out in our Oort Cloud. I was reading in National Geographic that the newest theories are that the giant planets moved inward and outward quite a lot in the early days of the solar system, and probably tossed several rocky planets and/or dwarf planets out into the Oort Cloud.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#6    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,302 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:41 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 02 September 2013 - 11:20 PM, said:

Has anyone done any calculations on the chances of one entering our solar system?  Since over several billion years it seems the system has had no such encounters with other stars, I tend to think that the galaxy is so big that in spite of all the rogue planets that probably exist we are nevertheless fairly safe.
It would not surprise me if every once in a while a rogue planet comes through and creates more comets to rain inward, and throws off the orbits of the various planets just a little.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#7    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 31,158 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:48 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 02 September 2013 - 11:35 PM, said:

Perhaps we'll eventually be able to image these planets and go out looking to visit some.

Visiting them is a very long way off, but imaging them... we've already done that (see HERE).

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#8    cacoseraph

cacoseraph

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 176 posts
  • Joined:27 Aug 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tucson, AZ, USA

  • this user is both more and less wrathful and more and less clever than he seems

Posted 03 September 2013 - 12:05 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 02 September 2013 - 11:20 PM, said:

Has anyone done any calculations on the chances of one entering our solar system?  Since over several billion years it seems the system has had no such encounters with other stars, I tend to think that the galaxy is so big that in spite of all the rogue planets that probably exist we are nevertheless fairly safe.


It wouldn't be *too* hard to just do the volume metrics of it.  I'd have to get my brother to help with the calculus, though.


Heh, nevermind, I'm going to cheat.

Volume of the Heliosphere inside the Termination shock = 6 to 10 ×1039 m3  (i'm goign to go with 8*10^39)

Volume of a galaxy like the Milky Way = ~3.3×1061 m3

(both from http://en.wikipedia....nitude_(volume))

so... 200,000,000,000 free planets = 2*10^11

so, assuming a regular distribution that means each free planet has 3.3*10^61 / 2*10^11 m^3 to itself.

that should equal 1.65*10^50 m^3.

that means that our heliosphere would fit into one free planet's volume of occupation

1.65*10^50 / 8*10^39 = 0.20625 * 10 ^ 11 = ~2*10^10

so, unless i messed something up there is an instantaneous chance of 1 in 20,000,000,000  or a rogue planet being in the same space as our solar system.

someone should probably check the math.  and that is pretty much useless.  if i knew the average speed of a free planet i could maybe work up some kind of new probability, but that would be WAAAAYYYYY harder than my little fun with exponents game up there.

edit:

Also, I don't think assuming an even distribution is at all right.  I expect there would be a far higher density towards the galactic core and far lower density  out toward the edge, where we are.  But that involves calculus I can no longer do =P

Edited by cacoseraph, 03 September 2013 - 12:06 AM.


#9    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 03 September 2013 - 12:32 AM

Impressive.  Am I right in thinking the odds are further reduced by the fact that most objects are moving at roughly the same speed parallel to each other?


#10    cacoseraph

cacoseraph

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 176 posts
  • Joined:27 Aug 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tucson, AZ, USA

  • this user is both more and less wrathful and more and less clever than he seems

Posted 03 September 2013 - 12:35 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 03 September 2013 - 12:32 AM, said:

Impressive.  Am I right in thinking the odds are further reduced by the fact that most objects are moving at roughly the same speed parallel to each other?

I... think so.  The whole galaxy is spinning and most stuff does spin in the same direction in orbits.  But at least the rogue plants formed around stars that are later ejected seem like they would have a good mechanism for breaking that "rule".


And I believe for simple orbital mechanics faster things go out into farther orbit and slower things move in, so their could be a fair amount of cross lane traffic, even for stuff moving in the same direction.

But honestly, I really have no idea.


#11    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:08 AM

Well one chance in 20 billion is pretty low and would indicate we would not expect it during the life of the sun.


#12    StarMountainKid

StarMountainKid

    Cheese

  • Member
  • 3,574 posts
  • Joined:17 Feb 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Star Mountain, Corporate States of America

  • We have problems because we stray from what is innocent and pure.

Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:09 AM

As someone in the other thread suggests, maybe one of these is a Dyson sphere. I think it would have a different reflective surface than a planet, so it would be easy to spot. Just my imagination going its own way.

The acceptance of authority does not lead to intelligence.
A mind untouched by thought...the end of knowledge.
My credentials: http://www.unexplain...ic=87935&st=225

#13    spacecowboy342

spacecowboy342

    Traveler of both time and space

  • Member
  • 4,105 posts
  • Joined:22 Aug 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

  • I shall now proceed to entangle the entire area

Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:19 AM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 03 September 2013 - 01:09 AM, said:

As someone in the other thread suggests, maybe one of these is a Dyson sphere. I think it would have a different reflective surface than a planet, so it would be easy to spot. Just my imagination going its own way.
Definitely an interesting thought. Wish I had thought of it


#14    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,302 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 03 September 2013 - 02:14 AM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 03 September 2013 - 01:09 AM, said:

As someone in the other thread suggests, maybe one of these is a Dyson sphere. I think it would have a different reflective surface than a planet, so it would be easy to spot. Just my imagination going its own way.
If it was a well built Dyson Sphere you wouldn't see it at all, as it would absorb all the interior energy. I guess there would still be reflection. But, I'd collecte even that if it was my sphere.

Then I'd take all that collected energy and use it to make a laser to send my light sail ship off to other systems. Hummm...... But, then they'd see the light....

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#15    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 03 September 2013 - 02:21 AM

To maintain thermal balance it would have to radiate some way or another.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users