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Morgellons


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#16    Rafterman

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 05:17 PM

These people are mentally ill.

Sufferers lobbied Congress for years to study the disease.  So they did and the CDC found there was nothing physically wrong with any of the sufferers.  The Mayo Clinic and the American Academy of Dermatology also did their own studies and came to the same conclusions.  The AAD even recommended that dermatologists treat Morgellans sufferers with antipsychotics and that has shown to be effective.  

But of course none of this mattered to the groups.

As for the GMO tie-in - well, since GMOs are vilified for everything else, sure, why not.

"For me, it is better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."
                                                                                                                                           - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World:  Science as a Candle in the Dark

#17    stereologist

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 05:36 PM

So I wasted a bunch of time listening to a stupid video. This video is summarized in the following few sentences.

1. the bulk of the video is people doing self diagnosis
2. A scientist at OSU names Randy Whymore (sp?) thinks it may be real
3. A doctor named Rhonda Casey thinks its real
4. A doctor named Vincent Delisle (sp?) does not
5. A Ron Poge from the OK crime lab got a no hit on one fiber tested

A typical almost content free video that was a waste of time to watch. Next time provide a review so save others from suffering.

And the context of the video is a request by Congress to the CDC to do a check on this disease. The CDC reported morgellons is not a new disease.


#18    Astral Hillbilly

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 06:51 PM

View Postzoser, on 22 September 2013 - 06:54 PM, said:

I cannot agree.  It looks everything like a real disease.  If two year old boys and teenage girls are suffering from it in the same family how can it not be?

In the above clip we see an image of a teenage girl with a painful looking sore, sprouting from it is some fibrous material.

I'm sorry but this is not imagined.

It's a classic case of the medical profession pre-deciding that it is a false disease based on the fact that they do not understand the science.

"I don't have a clue so it's not real"

Also the classification of these people as psychiatric patients is criminal.  If I had the power I would withdraw professional status from those individuals who deny the disease. It's the condemning of people to the mad house all over again.  The medical profession did that in the 19th and 20th Century and clearly it has not learned from it's mistakes.

It happens in Ufology and everywhere else.  It's nothing new,

Edit to add

My guess is that you have been reading out of date material.  I cannot imaging how you would have reached that conclusion from looking at more up to date cases.


O.K. Then where did this woman get the fibers that were tested and found not to be a match to any known fibers in the FBI's database, natural or un-natural ? Totally unknown. My guess for the response from the medical community is based on the fact it wasn't covered in medical school, therefore, it doesn't exist. Sometimes, supposed smart people can be too smart for their own good. In this case, I don't think anyone's opinion matters without data to back it up. I certainly haven't been convinced it's not a real disease. Neither was Legionaires disease (excuse the misspelling).


#19    stereologist

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 06:58 PM

Some follow up info on the people in the video.
Mary the mom did coin the term morgellons. She went to 8 different doctors and decided the world was wrong so she invented this disease.

Here is the report from the CDC. It requires reading.
http://www.plosone.o...al.pone.0029908

Here is another report about a Mayo study
http://www.medpageto...rmatology/26503

Quote

Eighty patients also brought specimens in bags, envelopes, and jars -- and only one specimen actually contained a parasite, which was identified as a pubic louse.

Wymore and Casey have been trying to claim this is a case of delusions of parasites vs morgellons. There are many other skin conditions to consider and they know that but continue to push for only 2 possibilities. Mymore admits that fibers now collected are all environmental and that he has not replicated that find that was the odd unknown fiber.
http://www.theguardi...terious-illness

Quote

Next, I corner Randy Wymore. He is a slim man with a charcoal shirt, orange tie and neatly squared goatee. "We have not yet exactly replicated the exact results of the forensics people in Tulsa," he admits. So far, the laboratory has found Wymore's various morgellons fibres to be: nylon; cotton; a blond human hair; a fungal fibre; a rodent hair; and down, most likely from geese or ducks.

The fiber colors most often described by morgellon sufferers are the colors of most environmental fibers.

Morgellons sufferers and others are now blaming chemtrails, nanotechnology, HAARP and other typical CT issues for their woes.


#20    stereologist

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 07:05 PM

View PostAstral Hillbilly, on 23 September 2013 - 06:51 PM, said:

O.K. Then where did this woman get the fibers that were tested and found not to be a match to any known fibers in the FBI's database, natural or un-natural ? Totally unknown. My guess for the response from the medical community is based on the fact it wasn't covered in medical school, therefore, it doesn't exist. Sometimes, supposed smart people can be too smart for their own good. In this case, I don't think anyone's opinion matters without data to back it up. I certainly haven't been convinced it's not a real disease. Neither was Legionaires disease (excuse the misspelling).

A single fiber does not a disease make. Maybe there were something on the fiber that confused the equipment. Would the equipment figure out the fiber type if I impregnated a cotton fiber with whale oil? Would the machine identify acmite? Just because the machine cannot identify something does not mean the object came from within the person.


#21    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:12 PM

View PostAstral Hillbilly, on 23 September 2013 - 06:51 PM, said:

O.K. Then where did this woman get the fibers that were tested and found not to be a match to any known fibers in the FBI's database, natural or un-natural ? Totally unknown. My guess for the response from the medical community is based on the fact it wasn't covered in medical school, therefore, it doesn't exist. Sometimes, supposed smart people can be too smart for their own good. In this case, I don't think anyone's opinion matters without data to back it up. I certainly haven't been convinced it's not a real disease. Neither was Legionaires disease (excuse the misspelling).

Don't for God sake confuse stereologist with detail.

Edited by zoser, 24 September 2013 - 07:34 PM.

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#22    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:14 PM

View Poststereologist, on 23 September 2013 - 07:05 PM, said:

A single fiber does not a disease make. Maybe there were something on the fiber that confused the equipment. Would the equipment figure out the fiber type if I impregnated a cotton fiber with whale oil? Would the machine identify acmite? Just because the machine cannot identify something does not mean the object came from within the person.

So explain it then.  If you can.  AH said what the researchers said that the fibres are not in the database.

Over to you.

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#23    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:18 PM

View Poststereologist, on 23 September 2013 - 05:36 PM, said:

So I wasted a bunch of time listening to a stupid video. This video is summarized in the following few sentences.

1. the bulk of the video is people doing self diagnosis
2. A scientist at OSU names Randy Whymore (sp?) thinks it may be real
3. A doctor named Rhonda Casey thinks its real
4. A doctor named Vincent Delisle (sp?) does not
5. A Ron Poge from the OK crime lab got a no hit on one fiber tested

A typical almost content free video that was a waste of time to watch. Next time provide a review so save others from suffering.

And the context of the video is a request by Congress to the CDC to do a check on this disease. The CDC reported morgellons is not a new disease.

A waste of time because the conclusion did not match your pre-decided bias.  If the fibre was a 'no hit' then what was it?

Try putting yourself in the position of someone suffering if you can.

Edited by zoser, 24 September 2013 - 07:32 PM.

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#24    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:33 PM

Here is an excellent article.  

Three weeks ago, we wrote about a “disease” known asMorgellons that very few people in the world know anything about. We placed the word disease above in quotation marks only because a large number of physicians refuse to recognize Morgellons as a medical affliction, with some even refusing to treat patients who suffer from it.
We have listened to a long litany of accounts about doctors who have literally laughed in the faces of Morgellons sufferers, male and female, young and old, with many attempting to make referrals to psychologists. Remarkably, other physicians have mounted web sites mocking and attacking people who report they have Morgellons and those who write about it. Some physicians have dubbed the disease Delusions of Parasitosis, meaning it’s all in the patient’s head. Additionally, there is a website entitled morgellonswatch.com “dedicated to examining the claims made regarding what is termed ‘Morgellons Disease’” and to preventing “sick people into thinking they may have a terrible disease.” Oddly, there are no formal individual or institutional sponsoring names identified on this site.
Despite this seemingly general stance from the “medical community” there are clear exceptions. Nearly every state across the US, and country in Europe, has at least several medical professionals who regard Morgellons as “a serious emerging infectious disease deserving study and research.” Dr. Ahmed Kilani, Laboratory Director of Clongen Laboratories, Germantown, Maryland, says, “I have personally listened to detailed descriptions of the symptoms of this disease and something has got to be done.”

Read more.........

http://www.voltairen...icle165822.html

Edited by zoser, 24 September 2013 - 07:33 PM.

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#25    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:36 PM

Here's more from the above article:

These arguments fall apart quickly, however, when the fibers — and the patients — are actually examined. Morgellons fibers, when examined closely, consistently appear as autoflourescent, meaning that they exhibit a glow under ultraviolet light. Certain marine organisms, such as particular types of jellyfish, also have autofluorescent properties. One fluorescent protein, known as “green flourescent protein,” has been studied extensively in recent years as a marker in the study of gene expression; it has been successfully introduced into many bacteria and fungi, as well as into fish, plant, insect, and even human cells. Fluorescent markers, in the form of genetic modifications or dyes, are also often used to track the presence of microbes in the environment. Oil consuming microbes, for example, are often marked with the use of a fluorescent stain for monitoring purposes.
A privately funded study conducted by Dr. Hildegarde Staninger, Industrial Toxicologist & Doctor of Integrative Medicine, revealed that the fibers are able to withstand temperatures of up to 1700 degrees Fahrenheit [= 927º C] before burning, and that they do not melt. Her results indicated that the fiber’s outer casing appears to consist of high-density polyethylene fiber, an industrial material commonly used in the production of fiber optic cables. Interestingly, this material is also used in the emerging field of bionanotechnology as a compound to encapsulate a viral protein envelope. Furthermore, Staninger reported finding blue fibers that exhibited a golden tip; she believes these to be a form of nano-machinery, able to be programmed to perform specific functions.

Edited by zoser, 24 September 2013 - 07:38 PM.

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#26    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 08:02 PM

Could there be a link between 'angel hair' and Morgellons?

Since our last article was published here, a very disturbing number of verified incidents involving Morgellons victims have been reported. Many of these accounts concern infected people receiving warnings “not to speak” with the media or to “keep your mouth shut about this disease.” These warnings have come from people claiming to represent or to work for “intelligence” or “law enforcement” agencies. Several of the warned individuals had earlier reported seeing odd “fabric-like” and “web-like” materials falling from the sky prior to their coming down with the disease.

Caroline Carter, 50 years old, an alternative health therapist practicing in Cyprus, Greece, contracted Morgellons disease in August 2007, after discovering her garden in England “covered in a very strange web-like substance.” Looking further, she found the same substance covering other nearby gardens and hedgerows. Within about a day all of the foliage touched by the substance began wilting and dying.

Carter began collecting some of the web-like substance and felt a bit on her left upper arm. She recalled, “It was a sharp nip but there was not any visible mark.” Yet by the end of the day her arm was “really aggravating me as no matter what I did I could not stop a persistent itch that had begun shortly after the bite.” From that day forward the itch never left Carter.

In 2008, Caroline Carter moved to Cyprus. About a year later, she was diagnosed as having intestinal fungal overgrowth and a B12 deficiency. Carter’s rash also had worsened, despite concentrated efforts at treatment. The rash produced severe burning and itching, and continued to spread over her entire body. At the time, Carter did “not consider that Morgellons was the cause of my pain as many lesions appearing over my body were scabbing over.” While she knew about the disease everything she had seen informed her that Morgellons lesions “do not scab over or heal.”


http://www.voltairen...icle165822.html


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#27    zoser

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 08:07 PM

More on the link with GM:

http://www.globalres...ns-disease/8464

and here is a good summary of the illness showing it's history and extent.

http://www.healthsci...llons/index.cfm

Edited by zoser, 24 September 2013 - 08:11 PM.

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#28    stereologist

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 09:18 PM

View Postzoser, on 24 September 2013 - 07:12 PM, said:

Don't for God sake confuse stereologist with detail.

Sorry to confuse you with facts.


#29    stereologist

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 09:26 PM

View Postzoser, on 24 September 2013 - 07:14 PM, said:

So explain it then.  If you can.  AH said what the researchers said that the fibres are not in the database.

Over to you.

So what? That does not mean it is a disease. Again, over to you


#30    stereologist

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 09:29 PM

Quote

A waste of time because the conclusion did not match your pre-decided bias.  If the fibre was a 'no hit' then what was it?

Try putting yourself in the position of someone suffering if you can.
It seems reading and comprehension are a problem. It was a waste of time to the lack of content in the video.

If the fiber is a no hit then it is a no-hit. What is it? It is not something useful at this time.

Putting myself in the position of a sufferer has no bearing on the issue of whether or not this is a new disease or not.





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