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Computer of one-atom-thick carbon tubes built


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#1    seeder

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 11:37 AM

Engineers build computer of one-atom-thick carbon tubes

American engineers said Wednesday they had built the first computer made entirely of microscopic carbon "nanotubes" -- a big step in the quest for faster, ever-smaller electronic devices.

While performing only basic functions at speeds likened to a 1950s computer, the tiny machine was hailed as a breakthrough in the search for an alternative to silicon transistors, which control the electricity flow in computer microchips.

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are rolled-up, single-layer sheets of carbon atoms -- tens of thousands can fit into the width of a single human hair. They are pliable and have the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any known material.

http://www.newsdaily...ck-carbon-tubes

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#2    Taun

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 11:48 AM

I think this could easily be as massive a game changer as the silicon IC was or the transistor before it...

Since carbon is a better conductor than silicon is (less resistance) I would imagine that this would also generate less system heat than the current technology does... And in the cyber world heat is a problem...





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