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6,000 year-old language, reconstructed

language linguists proto-indo-european vocabulary

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#31    Abramelin

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 12:18 AM

View PostAjiesh, on 29 September 2013 - 12:15 AM, said:

It could be , i just quoted as it was published in a well acclaimed magazine like forbes in july 1985 , but what so ever as i mentioned ."Briggs makes no claim about it being a "suitable language for computer software". Not least because such a claim, about any natural language, is meaningless."

Yes I will have a look at Aymara language . innovations and changes happen always -- we all have to accept the fact .

about sanskrit "mother of all euro language " is again highly debatable but only fact is that , its very closest to what i said and im not that big expert to do a debate . My debate on the basis of reading knowledge and my knowledge of 5 indian languages (out of which 2 languages which i speak have roots older than sanskrit - ie dravidian & devanagiri)

Some articles about the Aymara language:

http://www.creationm...mputer-language

http://www.scienceda...60613185239.htm

http://tech.dir.grou...ons/topics/3360


#32    Everdred

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 01:26 AM

View PostAjiesh, on 28 September 2013 - 11:32 PM, said:

Fantastic - This very similar to sanskrit .(below I have put sanskrit meaning to which all I know ,Iam from India )

"Avis = means apparently,seemingly ,it seems
, jasmin
varna =color,paint, lusture,unknown quantity
na= NO
a ast= act
, dadarka
akvams
, tam= languishing , fainting
, vagham
garum = germ
'vaghantam= highest voice
, tam
, bharam= pressure or weight

magham = something to do with Magha constellation
, tam,
manum =thinking creature
aku = mole/rat or thief
bharantam
. Avis
akvabhjams
a
vavakat
: kard = rumble / unpleasant voice
aghnutai
mai= me or to me
vidanti = they say
manum
akvams
agantam=name of a lord (siva according to veda)
. Akvasas
a
vavakant = indeed move (vava= indeed) kant= move
: krudhi = either anger or Play
avai=weave
, kard
aghnutai
vividvant-
svas:=breath
manus=man
patis = Eye or Sea
varnam
avisams = a vision
karnauti = bore
svabhjam =sva (of self)
gharmam =very hot
vastram = cloths
avibhjams = avi = disposed ,bhajam = worship
ka
varna na
asti = Bone
Tat  = That  (Thath will be the sanskrit pronunciation )
kukruvants
avis
agram = before
a
bhugat = existing in earth


thanks guys

You could claim it were "very similar to Sanskrit" if the meanings actually aligned, but they very obviously do not.  Just look at the first word, avis, which is the reconstructed word for sheep.  That's not even remotely similar to the Sanskrit meaning you've listed.  The same can be said for most of the other meanings you've listed.


#33    Ad hoc

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 03:33 AM

View PostAjiesh, on 28 September 2013 - 11:32 PM, said:

Fantastic - This very similar to sanskrit .(below I have put sanskrit meaning to which all I know ,Iam from India )

"Avis = means apparently,seemingly ,it seems
, jasmin
varna =color,paint, lusture,unknown quantity
na= NO
a ast= act
, dadarka
akvams
, tam= languishing , fainting
, vagham
garum = germ
'vaghantam= highest voice
, tam
, bharam= pressure or weight

magham = something to do with Magha constellation
, tam,
manum =thinking creature
aku = mole/rat or thief
bharantam
. Avis
akvabhjams
a
vavakat
: kard = rumble / unpleasant voice
aghnutai
mai= me or to me
vidanti = they say
manum
akvams
agantam=name of a lord (siva according to veda)
. Akvasas
a
vavakant = indeed move (vava= indeed) kant= move
: krudhi = either anger or Play
avai=weave
, kard
aghnutai
vividvant-
svas:=breath
manus=man
patis = Eye or Sea
varnam
avisams = a vision
karnauti = bore
svabhjam =sva (of self)
gharmam =very hot
vastram = cloths
avibhjams = avi = disposed ,bhajam = worship
ka
varna na
asti = Bone
Tat  = That  (Thath will be the sanskrit pronunciation )
kukruvants
avis
agram = before
a
bhugat = existing in earth


thanks guys


So lets just nail that sanskrit story.


Ahem *Once upon a time...*

...There was seemingly a colour that couldn't act and fainted.
A germ with the highest voice pressured the magha constellation thinking-creature mole rat thieves!!

Then, seemingly fainting, a rumbling voice said: sentient-creatures, it's Siva!
So I moved in a playful weave.
The breath of a man on the eye gave a colourful vision of me being borne by very hot cloths...

And I disposed of my worship and a colourful bone that seemingly had previously been existing in the earth.


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Feel free to make corrections. However, in my opinion, this is already a much better story than sheep and horses.


#34    Frank Merton

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 03:40 AM

Sanskrit and its close relative Pali are at the far eastern edge of the Indo-European language range, as Gaelic is at the far western edge.  That makes it highly unlikely that either is the origin of the family.


#35    kmt_sesh

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 06:15 AM

View Postfreetoroam, on 28 September 2013 - 09:34 AM, said:

Do accents from the regions get taken into account?
Just look at England, we use the same language , but you would not think so when listening to how different regions pronounce the `alleged` said words.
Each new generation comes out with its own made up words too, like today ie: innit.
Apart from the difference in pronounciation, each region will have its own words for certain things, so how can do they come up with the accent in the voiced tape?

Agreed that the PIE reconstruction is theoretical, which by necessity it has to be, but I don't think it's really as make-believe as you seem to think. Linguists have been studying PIE for a long time now, and while I am not expert on PIE studies myself, I understand how the dissection and backtracking of Indo-European languages can lead to the theoretical models proposed. To me it sounds a hell of a lot like Old English.

I don't know that modern English would be a good example to use because English is more of a mutt language than probably any other today. What you hear in England today, or in the United States and Australia and elsewhere—is the end result of a thousand-plus years of profound mixing with and influences from a variety of other languages. PIE would be the very beginning of the language family that would much later lead to Indo-European languages, so while it may have had dialects, equating it with the course and development of English is sketchy at best.

I think these linguists are on firmer ground than you might believe, but where I personally am skeptical is with some linguists who have tried to form theoretical models on the first spoken language, period. This would've been in Africa, of course, and these same linguists have posited that the click languages of Africa may be the remnants of the first language. I am not convinced.

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#36    godnodog

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 02:59 PM

sounds greek to me :DDDD


#37    John Wesley Boyd

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 09:37 PM

A speculative and highly suspect re-creation. Kudos for their effort but it has only a little more validity than Klingon.


#38    3.0

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 12:57 AM

One or two words sounded Germanic to me.


#39    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:01 AM

View Posthammerclaw, on 29 September 2013 - 09:37 PM, said:

A speculative and highly suspect re-creation. Kudos for their effort but it has only a little more validity than Klingon.
I have to conclude massive ignorance of linguistics here.


#40    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:09 AM

The thing about English is, first, that the coming of the Norsemen with their slightly different suffixes than the Germanic suffixes Anglo-Saxon then had led to a generalized stripping of English of most of its cases and declensions and so on.  (In order to communicate the root words were basically the same so they started talking in just the roots, and using prepositions and word order instead of suffixes.)

Then in the Middle Ages came the "Great Vowel Change" (for unknown reasons) where English went astray in its vowel pronunciation from the other languages of continental Europe.

Also of course the double and sometimes triple vocabulary -- Germanic, French and Latin (the French is also from Latin but changed in the process of going through being French) makes English far more precise in its available word choices ("door" vs, "portal").

In short English has strayed quite far from its Indo-European origins.


#41    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:14 AM

The Great Vowel Change leads to some of the most persistent errors Vietnamese learning to speak English tend to make.  Vietnamese uses an alphabet taken from French in the late nineteenth century, so its pronunciation rules are largely those of the French.  In particular, along with all West European languages except English, the letter "i" is pronounced as English "ee" ("feet"), so you get "fit" pronounced "feet," and so on (much as in a Mexican or Italian accent where the same thing happens.

This is fairly harmless and native English speakers don't much mind it, except for a certain word that begins with "sh".


#42    Ad hoc

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:49 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 30 September 2013 - 01:14 AM, said:

The Great Vowel Change
heh, I remember having a really hard-nosed English teacher that gave us Chaucer to study, and insisted on reading out the passages in the correct accent and then asking us to analyse it. Sounded like another language, until you actually read the words. Seems Chaucer was near the beginning of the great vowel shift.


#43    freetoroam

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 05:46 PM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 29 September 2013 - 06:15 AM, said:

Agreed that the PIE reconstruction is theoretical, which by necessity it has to be, but I don't think it's really as make-believe as you seem to think. Linguists have been studying PIE for a long time now, and while I am not expert on PIE studies myself, I understand how the dissection and backtracking of Indo-European languages can lead to the theoretical models proposed. To me it sounds a hell of a lot like Old English.

I don't know that modern English would be a good example to use because English is more of a mutt language than probably any other today. What you hear in England today, or in the United States and Australia and elsewhere—is the end result of a thousand-plus years of profound mixing with and influences from a variety of other languages. PIE would be the very beginning of the language family that would much later lead to Indo-European languages, so while it may have had dialects, equating it with the course and development of English is sketchy at best.

I think these linguists are on firmer ground than you might believe, but where I personally am skeptical is with some linguists who have tried to form theoretical models on the first spoken language, period. This would've been in Africa, of course, and these same linguists have posited that the click languages of Africa may be the remnants of the first language. I am not convinced.
I do not think it is make-believe, I  do not think they have the accents right.
Take on here for instance, I type (the best I can) in a language all understand, but accents can change the sounds of that language quite dramatically, so unless the researches took their findings from writings without taking in account the regional accent, I can not see how it could sound the way they have made it on the tape.

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#44    kmt_sesh

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 02:42 AM

View Postfreetoroam, on 30 September 2013 - 05:46 PM, said:

I do not think it is make-believe, I  do not think they have the accents right.
Take on here for instance, I type (the best I can) in a language all understand, but accents can change the sounds of that language quite dramatically, so unless the researches took their findings from writings without taking in account the regional accent, I can not see how it could sound the way they have made it on the tape.

In that respect I apologize because I misread your intent. I think we were both touching on the same idea but were looking at it differently. The only cautionary note I would make is that we cannot know how widely PIE was spoken before it branched out, or if there was regional variation (i.e., dialects).

And in this light I have to agree with you. You're right. There's no way, I believe, to know the actual sounds of PIE because it is too far in the past. We can only propose theoretical models based on studies of modern to ancient Indo-European languages and how words and sounds might have shifted through time. This is certainly known fairly well for more recent centuries, but not so well for the ancient past. And from my own studies of the ancient Egyptian language I can contribute about PIE that we will never know things that are key to pronunciation, such as syllable stresses.

Still, I find it interesting, but I'm a boring old fart who's always been intrigued by ancient languages.

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#45    jaylemurph

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 06:00 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 30 September 2013 - 01:01 AM, said:

I have to conclude massive ignorance of linguistics here.

I'd go so far as to say I'm reasonably well-versed in linguistics, and by and large I agree with hammerclaw. The extant data is so slight and the interpretations of it so open to criticism(s), that in specific regard to what the language actually sounded like, that anything claiming to be genuinely PIE is highly questionable.

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