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Russia could build manned lunar base

moon roscosmos moon base

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31 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:04 PM

Russia could build manned lunar base - academician


Voice of Russia said:

The federal space agency Roscosmos has launched a feasibility study of a project to build a manned base on the Moon, Academician Lev Zelyony, director of the Russian Academy of Sciences' Space Research Institute, said on Friday.

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 18 December 2013 - 01:48 AM.
typo

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#2    Drayno

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:08 PM

For the sake of science, I hope this actually works out.

Let's start another space-race.

First one to build a manned lunar space station wins. :D

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- William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act III, Scene II
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#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:19 PM

View PostHatake Kakashi, on 08 October 2013 - 11:08 PM, said:

For the sake of science, I hope this actually works out.
I couldn't agree more.

View PostHatake Kakashi, on 08 October 2013 - 11:08 PM, said:

Let's start another space-race.

Actually, let's not.

The last space race resulted in unnecessary duplication of resources. The rush for each side to be first led to the deaths of the Apollo 1 crew of Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee for the USA and to Vladimir Komarov, commander of Soyuz 1 for the Soviet Union.

The ISS demonstrates the advantages of working together. Let's learn that lesson and explore the Moon together.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 08 October 2013 - 11:19 PM.
typo

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    DONTEATUS

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:22 PM

Its All good If we All do it together ! :tu:

This is a Work in Progress!

#5    Drayno

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:31 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 08 October 2013 - 11:19 PM, said:

I couldn't agree more.



Actually, let's not.

The last space race resulted in unnecessary duplication of resources. The rush for each side to be first led to the deaths of the Apollo 1 crew of Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee for the USA and to Vladimir Komarov, commander of Soyuz 1 for the Soviet Union.

The ISS demonstrates the advantages of working together. Let's learn that lesson and explore the Moon together.

You have a good point, Waspie.

On top of the unnecessary risk of lives - these aren't just any people, but people who have gone through months and months of training..

You have to have a very sharp mind in order to be an astronaut, as well..

If a lunar base could operate similarly to the ISS, that'd be good.

I imagine the ISS would be used to transport supplies like food and water to any astronauts on a lunar base in the future.

Kind of like a rest-stop. ;)

Edited by Hatake Kakashi, 08 October 2013 - 11:32 PM.

"Let us sit upon the ground and tell sad stories of the death of kings."
- William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act III, Scene II
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#6    BadChadB33

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:40 PM

"Mr Powers, Welcome to my moon base!!"


#7    marcos anthony toledo

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:50 PM

We should had the Moon base by 2001 instead of wasting all those billions of dollars on stupid wars for the last forty years.


#8    Drayno

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:55 PM

View Postmarcos anthony toledo, on 09 October 2013 - 03:50 PM, said:

We should had the Moon base by 2001 instead of wasting all those billions of dollars on stupid wars for the last forty years.

I don't disagree with you.

If all of humanity pooled their resources together instead of competing, we could see some major scientific advancements.

Although competition helps to keep technology on its toes.

"Let us sit upon the ground and tell sad stories of the death of kings."
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#9    Calibeliever

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:28 PM

As soon as they figure out a financial or military advantage to having a base on the moon it will happen over the course of just a few years. Wasn't there as discussion a while back about minig helium3?


#10    kannin

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:47 PM

build one on the darkside XD


#11    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:50 PM

View PostCalibeliever, on 09 October 2013 - 05:28 PM, said:

As soon as they figure out a financial or military advantage to having a base on the moon it will happen over the course of just a few years.
That is a rather cynical view. Much scientific research and exploration is undertaken with neither military or financial advantage being the goal. The ISS and the Large Hadron Collider, polar exploration and the ascent of Everest immediately come to mind.

It is in man's nature to explore, whether that be physically exploring new frontiers or pushing the limits of scientific knowledge. A return to the Moon is inevitable, it is a matter of when, not if.

View PostCalibeliever, on 09 October 2013 - 05:28 PM, said:

Wasn't there as discussion a while back about minig helium3?
At the moment Helium-3 is a red herring. It may have a use in fusion reactors in the future. Most most experts believe that working fusion reactors are still fifty years away. Currently 3He has no practical use and therefore no commercial value. It is possible that I will live long enough to see Lunar mining, but it is unlikely that it will be 3He that will be mining for.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#12    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:59 PM

View Postkannin, on 09 October 2013 - 05:47 PM, said:

build one on the darkside XD

Pink Floyd tracks apart, there is no such thing as "the darkside of the Moon". All parts of the Moon (except some craters at the poles) experience night and day.

If, however, you mean the far side then I have to ask, "why?"

There are some advantages to the far side, it is shielded from Earth's radio transmissions and so would be a good place for radio telescopes, but this could be done without having a manned base. In fact the radio transmissions from a manned base would remove some of the advantages of having the telescopes there to begin with.

There is one big problem with a far side base, it is permanently pointing away from Earth making direct communications impossible. Such a base would require the added complication (and therefore costs) of communications satellites place in the L2 Lagrange point.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#13    Farmer77

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 06:38 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 08 October 2013 - 11:19 PM, said:

I couldn't agree more.



Actually, let's not.

The last space race resulted in unnecessary duplication of resources. The rush for each side to be first led to the deaths of the Apollo 1 crew of Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee for the USA and to Vladimir Komarov, commander of Soyuz 1 for the Soviet Union.

The ISS demonstrates the advantages of working together. Let's learn that lesson and explore the Moon together.

JFK was the last one to try that and look what happened to him!

I don't suffer from insanity, I rather enjoy it

#14    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:30 PM

View PostFarmer77, on 09 October 2013 - 06:38 PM, said:

JFK was the last one to try that and look what happened to him!

????

JFK tired what?

How is his assassination anything to do with lunar exploration?

Your comment makes no sense that I can determine.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#15    kannin

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 10:04 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 09 October 2013 - 05:59 PM, said:

Pink Floyd tracks apart, there is no such thing as "the darkside of the Moon". All parts of the Moon (except some craters at the poles) experience night and day.

If, however, you mean the far side then I have to ask, "why?"

There are some advantages to the far side, it is shielded from Earth's radio transmissions and so would be a good place for radio telescopes, but this could be done without having a manned base. In fact the radio transmissions from a manned base would remove some of the advantages of having the telescopes there to begin with.

There is one big problem with a far side base, it is permanently pointing away from Earth making direct communications impossible. Such a base would require the added complication (and therefore costs) of communications satellites place in the L2 Lagrange point.
yeah was just a ink floyd pun XD sorry waspie






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