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Largest known star is tearing itself apart

red supergiants w26 star clusters westerlund 1

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:46 PM

How the largest star known is tearing itself apart


Royal Astronomical Society said:

An international team of astronomers has observed part of the final death throes of the largest known star in the Universe as it throws off its outer layers. The discovery, by a collaboration of scientists from the UK, Chile, Germany and the USA, is a vital step in understanding how massive stars return enriched material to the interstellar medium - the space between stars - which is necessary for forming planetary systems. The researchers publish their results in the Oxford University Press journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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#2    George Ford

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:10 AM

I was hungry is all.

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#3    Realm

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 01:46 AM

So that star has a radius of 648,575,000  miles or about 6.975 times wider than the distance from our sun to the earth. Wow.

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:02 AM

View PostRealm, on 20 October 2013 - 01:46 AM, said:

So that star has a radius of 648,575,000  miles or about 6.975 times wider than the distance from our sun to the earth. Wow.

Put another way:
If you replaced the Sun with W26 it's outer surface would be between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn,

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#5    Hazzard

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 07:34 PM

Wow indeed.

I still await the compelling Exhibit A.

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#6    Thelaw1

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 12:36 AM

I am ignorant on the subject but nonetheless interested. This star is bigger than VY Canis Majoris? If so, what are their sizes.





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