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Astronomers find 'most distant' galaxy


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:46 PM

An international team of astronomers has detected a galaxy that is 30 billion light years away.

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The galaxy was found using the Hubble Space Telescope and then later confirmed through the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. At 13. 1 billion years old the galaxy\'s distance in light years is much greater than its age due to the expansion of the universe.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...-distant-galaxy

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#2    qxcontinuum

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:11 PM

Something doesn't make sense in this claim speaking of deduction of years, distance age...etc


#3    Frank Merton

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:16 PM

It's because the universe is expanding (or at least getting less dense with more space between objects) so that an object that seems 13 billion light years away is really by now much further.


#4    LimeGelatin

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:42 PM

I call Bull ****... That is the farthest they could find... But, I know in my heart of hearts that the universe has no ending...


#5    Rolci

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:44 PM

"something doesn't make sense" is so vague, it's on the verge of not making sense.


#6    Rlyeh

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:08 PM

View Postqxcontinuum, on 24 October 2013 - 02:11 PM, said:

Something doesn't make sense in this claim speaking of deduction of years, distance age...etc
Makes sense to me. Of course I accept the universe is expanding.


#7    Skithia

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:12 PM

still think 30 billion light years is a bit far in a universe only 13.8 billion years old lol


#8    Somethings Not Right

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:44 PM

It's quite far away then!!  

If light travels at the speed of light then how does a telescope see something that far away when the light takes 30 billion years to get to the lense?
Could someone explain it (in layman's terms) because I'm finding it difficult to take in....  :no:


#9    Harte

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:04 PM

I was giving off light on the way.

Simple enough?

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#10    J. K.

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:28 PM

What is the velocity of the expansion of the universe, and has the center of the universe been located using red/blue shift measurements?

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#11    Spacenut56

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:37 PM

Saw it. Pretty amazing. This story is all over the web today.


#12    Harte

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:22 PM

View PostJ. K., on 24 October 2013 - 07:28 PM, said:

What is the velocity of the expansion of the universe, and has the center of the universe been located using red/blue shift measurements?
The entire universe is expanding.  There is no center.

In fact, the idea of a center would be counter to the concept of relativity in that it would give us a reference point that was immobile and thus we would be able to measure all velocities against it - allowing the existence of absolute velocity.

If such a concept were true, then relativity experiments would not reveal what they have revealed.

Regarding the expansion velocity, there is none.

There is a rate of expansion.  How "fast" an object appears to recede from us depends on how much expanding space exists between that object and ourselves.

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#13    Resh

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 02:20 AM

View PostSkithia, on 24 October 2013 - 05:12 PM, said:

still think 30 billion light years is a bit far in a universe only 13.8 billion years old lol

My thoughts exactly!

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#14    Imaginarynumber1

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 03:50 AM

People are thinking about this wrong. The AGE of the universe is 13.798 0.037 billion years. This is not the same as the diameter of the observable universe (what we can see from earth) due to the expansion of space, which we now know is accelerating.

The diameter of the observable universe is estimated at 93 billion light years, making it roughly 46-47 billion years in each direction that we look.


#15    stevemagegod

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 04:03 AM

Perhaps this Galaxy is where the "Gods" reside. There are bound to be Earth Like Planets Google of years old and in that time frame a Civilization should of developed and traveled here if they don't blow them selves up first like we eventually will.





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