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Intel Core vPro processors


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#1    OverSword

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:39 PM

My favorite part of this article should serve as a warning to American companies:

The new Intel Core vPro processors contain a new remote access feature which allows 100% remote access to a PC 100% of the time, even if the computer is turned off. Core vPro processors contain a second physical processor embedded within the main processor which has its own operating system embedded on the chip itself. As long as the power supply is available and in working condition, it can be woken up by the Core vPro processor, which runs on the system’s phantom power and is able to quietly turn individual hardware components on and access anything on them.
Let’s make this perfectly clear. This eliminates ALL possible privacy. It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again. Someone will be able to even install software unknown to the owner.
Clearly, if this was not inspired by the NSA, they must be jumping up and down with glee. This means that anyone in the world using a computer with an Intel Chip will be vulnerable. If you go on vacation, and even turn off your computer, they will have a free access.
Between Microsoft and its Windows 8 and Intel with its Core vPro processors, it looks like it is time for competition to take that crown from the USA and restore privacy. Obviously, American companies grant every possible wish the NSA ever had.

read it here http://armstrongecon...whole-new-risk/


#2    Dark_Grey

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:45 PM

Good God, man. I've hear rumours of similar features already in several different AMD processors as well...

Talk about a brave new world...what kind of place will this be in another 15 years?

Exploring your own consciousness is the fundamental right of every individual

Locking people in a cage because they choose to exercise that right should be considered a crime against humanity


#3    OverSword

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:57 PM

Well like the article points out, now would be a good time for smaller processor manufacturerers to step up to the plate and give us a product which can guarantee privacy.  If they build it people will definetly buy it.  Intel would be driven out of the PC market and only big corporations on huge networks would desire to use thier spying product.


#4    Render

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:19 PM

You obviously don't even know what this all means and are just overexciting yourself because you think you're on to "them".
Love it how ppl just take out a fragment of information and put it into another context and think they got it all figured out.
Be afraid, be very afraid ... of your own illusions.


#5    Dark_Grey

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:23 PM

View PostRender, on 24 October 2013 - 08:19 PM, said:

You obviously don't even know what this all means and are just overexciting yourself because you think you're on to "them".
Love it how ppl just take out a fragment of information and put it into another context and think they got it all figured out.
Be afraid, be very afraid ... of your own illusions.

Does the NSA pay well? Did you get a good benefits package?

View PostOverSword, on 24 October 2013 - 05:39 PM, said:

As long as the power supply is available and in working condition, it can be woken up by the Core vPro processor, which runs on the system’s phantom power and is able to quietly turn individual hardware components on and access anything on them.

That's in terms even a computer layman could understand. I don't understand why you would call this an illusion.

Exploring your own consciousness is the fundamental right of every individual

Locking people in a cage because they choose to exercise that right should be considered a crime against humanity


#6    Render

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:28 PM

And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:


#7    Render

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:33 PM

I guess it's gonna take some time to google that one.
Feel free to panic until you learn more.


#8    Razer

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:11 PM

View PostRender, on 24 October 2013 - 08:28 PM, said:

And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:

Couldn't they access anything?  I'm not saying Intel would or that they are doing this for nefarious reasons, but it sure seems the potential is there for it to be exploited.  So it will be.

Edited by Razer, 24 October 2013 - 10:12 PM.


#9    badeskov

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:33 PM

This is naturally bogus. It is far simpler to use one of the primary cores than a dedicated core.

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#10    OverSword

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:57 PM

View PostRender, on 24 October 2013 - 08:28 PM, said:

And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:
It's not what 'Intel' will access render.  Use your imagination and try not to pretend that alphabet agencies don't drool at the prospect of having complete remote access to any computer that's online.


#11    sepulchrave

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:32 AM

If you are paranoid:

When you turn your computer off, also turn the power bar off. Phantom power is not sufficient to run actual components, so even if the evil agencies are trying to access your computer unless they have a secret agent inside your house to press the power bar button they can't turn your computer off.

Encrypt your harddrive with an open source encryption like true crypt, not a proprietary one that might ship with Windows or OS X. If you have an encryption key, keep it on a USB stick and physically remove it from your computer when you are not using it.

Turn off your Wifi or unplug your ethernet when you are not using your computer.

Get a firewall for your home network (again, using open source software) so you can completely block all untrusted incoming signals.


#12    Render

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 06:52 AM

View PostRazer, on 24 October 2013 - 10:11 PM, said:

Couldn't they access anything?  I'm not saying Intel would or that they are doing this for nefarious reasons, but it sure seems the potential is there for it to be exploited.  So it will be.

Well no, that's just not how computers work.


#13    Render

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:08 AM

View PostOverSword, on 24 October 2013 - 11:57 PM, said:

It's not what 'Intel' will access render.  Use your imagination and try not to pretend that alphabet agencies don't drool at the prospect of having complete remote access to any computer that's online.

This really isn't something where you can "use your imagination". Well not in the way the imagination runs wild here. Computers work a certain way...not this paranoid unrelated way which is portrayed here. Accessing a processor remotely is not the same as browsing through hard disk information. And you can get that info through a myriad of other ways. Not to scare you, but this is the reality we live in.

And not to bust anyones ego here : your information just isn't that interesting to follow up on.


And also: remote management isn't a new concept. It's over a decennia old. AND it's not even necessary (to access certain meta data). If anyone wants to access your computer, and you are connected to the internet, it's possible. But this technology is pretty damn awesome and distinguishes itself since you can repair a blocked system, from a distance. No more calling a helpdesk and waiting for someone to come over who doesn't know what to do when he gets there since he can't access anything. This is dream technology for many companies.

And, it's not like companies just roll out technologies like this. They are extensively tested by several instances, organizations, authorities. A certified authority doesn't just fall out of the air. And a company like Intel has a name to uphold.
If you know anything about computers, hardware and software, you know this thread is just ignorance at it's fullest.

Edited by Render, 25 October 2013 - 07:09 AM.


#14    Razer

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:37 AM

View PostRender, on 25 October 2013 - 06:52 AM, said:


Well no, that's just not how computers work.

Can you elaborate on that because as I am sitting here typing i'm accessing my computers processor via the keyboard which gives me access to everything on my computer.


#15    Render

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:52 AM

View PostRazer, on 25 October 2013 - 10:37 AM, said:

Can you elaborate on that because as I am sitting here typing i'm accessing my computers processor via the keyboard which gives me access to everything on my computer.

A processor does not store information.
Look at it like a calculator. Which it is.
A calculator waits for input and computes, it doesn't hold the info.

Which is why it is called a "processor". It processes.

Edited by Render, 25 October 2013 - 10:59 AM.





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