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Ghostly Shape of ‘Coldest Place in Universe’

nebulae planetary nebulae boomerang nebula pgc 3074547 nrao

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 12:45 PM

ALMA Reveals Ghostly Shape of ‘Coldest Place in the Universe’


National Radio Astronomy Observatory said:

At a cosmologically crisp one degree Kelvin (minus 458 degrees Fahrenheit), the Boomerang Nebula is the coldest known object in the Universe – colder, in fact, than the faint afterglow of the Big Bang, which is the natural background temperature of space.

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope have taken a new look at this intriguing object to learn more about its frigid properties and to determine its true shape, which has an eerily ghost-like appearance.

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#2    Joe2112

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:17 PM

Don't forget your long johns.


#3    keithisco

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:53 PM

What surprises me is that his object is actually quite close, yet energetic. Can it really be just 1 Kelvin degrees? I would have surmised that any energy (sufficient to cause expansion of the planetary nebula) to be well in excess of this value.

Perhaps, Waspie, you could enlighten us as to how an energetic object at this presumed temperature, has sufficient energy to drive expansion?

Why is such a close, expanding object, so cold? Why is the furthest object at 35 Billion Light Years distance (I get the Expanding Universe concept - but do not accept that we have a Universe expanding at multiples of the speed of light) actually much more distant that the presumed age of the universe

What are we truly measuring? Are our measurement techniques at risk of being incorrect? Are we extrapolating theories beyond their capabilities to offer fidelity?



I just dont get it....

Edited by keithisco, 29 October 2013 - 01:54 PM.


#4    moonshadow60

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:01 PM

How do they know the temperature of something so far away?


#5    Rhino666

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:08 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 29 October 2013 - 01:53 PM, said:

What surprises me is that his object is actually quite close, yet energetic. Can it really be just 1 Kelvin degrees? I would have surmised that any energy (sufficient to cause expansion of the planetary nebula) to be well in excess of this value.

Perhaps, Waspie, you could enlighten us as to how an energetic object at this presumed temperature, has sufficient energy to drive expansion?

Why is such a close, expanding object, so cold? Why is the furthest object at 35 Billion Light Years distance (I get the Expanding Universe concept - but do not accept that we have a Universe expanding at multiples of the speed of light) actually much more distant that the presumed age of the universe

What are we truly measuring? Are our measurement techniques at risk of being incorrect? Are we extrapolating theories beyond their capabilities to offer fidelity?



I just dont get it....

Me neither.


#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:53 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 29 October 2013 - 01:53 PM, said:

Perhaps, Waspie, you could enlighten us as to how an energetic object at this presumed temperature, has sufficient energy to drive expansion?
I think you'll need a physicist for this, not an ex-chemist.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    keithisco

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 10:03 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 29 October 2013 - 09:53 PM, said:

I think you'll need a physicist for this, not an ex-chemist.

LOL Waspie, but I know what you mean. As an aeronautical engineer with a passing amateur interest in pure physics some things fall well beneath my radar of understanding :tu:


#8    MysticStrummer

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 04:34 AM

Coldest place in the (observable) universe

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#9    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 06:04 AM

We measure its temperature from details of its spectrum.

I would assume energy has been taken out of it by the expansion.  That tends to cool things a bit as energy is consumed pushing outward.


#10    woopypooky

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 12:03 PM

how can stars be cold? they emit lights.


#11    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 12:08 PM

Sorry this is not stars but a nebula, which is typically very very rarefied gas or dust.


#12    Leonardo

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 01:15 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 30 October 2013 - 06:04 AM, said:

We measure its temperature from details of its spectrum.

I would assume energy has been taken out of it by the expansion.  That tends to cool things a bit as energy is consumed pushing outward.

The problem with that is CMB. CMB is everywhere and is hotter than the observed temperature of the nebula. Things only cool when they expand, if the space they are expanding into is less energetic (i.e. cooler). In this case that is not true. In theory, nothing should be naturally cooler than the temperature of empty space which, with CMB pervading it, is ~2.7 Kelvin.

Edited by Leonardo, 30 October 2013 - 01:17 PM.

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#13    Twin

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:18 AM

It seems improbable that the most extreme "anything" would be that close to our little corner of the universe.

BTW, I hate when then and than are confused (see the first sentence). I hate it almost as much as when people use BTW, BTW.

Edited by Twin, 03 November 2013 - 02:19 AM.


#14    Belial

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:00 AM

That be god that :tu:

Where it states "For official use only" - gently rub a white wax candle over the area indicated.

Kick a habit - i never did like Tolkien...




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