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Four-year-old girl killed by pet dog at home

lexi pet dog rag doll mountsorrel lexi hudson

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 10:13 PM

A young girl was killed by her pet dog on Tuesday after being shaken like a "rag doll" as her mother desperately tried to free her, neighbours said.

The child, named locally as four-year-old Lexi, died in hospital of her injuries after being attacked at her home by the animal.

http://www.telegraph...og-at-home.html

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#2    kannin

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:03 PM

horrid, as a father this would crush me and that dog would have had the ride of its life

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#3    Simbi Laveau

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:46 PM

It's not the dogs fault. Being cruel to it because of this is just stupid.
I understand it had to be destroyed, but the family shouldn't have gotten  a large dog with such a frail little girl in the home.
Common sense. Dogs this size, aggression aside, can knock people down and break bones, just being affectionate.
One of my friends had her dog do this to her aunt, who broke her hip in the fall.
If you chose to own such a dog, it's your responsibility, whatever occurs because of it, not the animals.
This is a tragedy all around.

Edited by Simbi Laveau, 05 November 2013 - 11:47 PM.

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#4    kannin

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:49 PM

View PostSimbi Laveau, on 05 November 2013 - 11:46 PM, said:

It's not the dogs fault. Being cruel to it because of this is just stupid.
I understand it had to be destroyed, but the family shouldn't have gotten  a large dog with such a frail little girl in the home.
Common sense. Dogs this size, aggression aside, can knock people down and break bones, just being affectionate.
One of my friends had her dog do this to her aunt, who broke her hip in the fall.
If you chose to own such a dog, it's your responsibility, whatever occurs because of it, not the animals.
This is a tragedy all around.

agreed, but id still demolish that dog just for the reason if i lost a kid i would lose my mind, but i do raise mine around dobermans but they learned and i taught them how to respect the dogs, this should be taught to children before a large possibly dangerous dog is braught into the home

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#5    skookum

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:02 AM

Unfortunately there is a very worrying culture of people wanting fighting and baiting dogs as status symbols in the UK.  Like said above you have no idea if you get one from a re-homing centre how it was treated in the past.

A girl who lived not far from was recently found to have a dog with American Pitbull in it.  She had it taken away but seems to have another virtually identical one.

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#6    Still Waters

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:43 PM

Update -

A pet dog that killed a four-year-old girl died from stab wounds, Leicestershire Police have confirmed.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...rshire-24839612

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#7    George Ford__AKA Bulveye__

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 03:03 PM

View PostSimbi Laveau, on 05 November 2013 - 11:46 PM, said:

It's not the dogs fault. Being cruel to it because of this is just stupid.
I understand it had to be destroyed, but the family shouldn't have gotten  a large dog with such a frail little girl in the home.
Common sense. Dogs this size, aggression aside, can knock people down and break bones, just being affectionate.
One of my friends had her dog do this to her aunt, who broke her hip in the fall.
If you chose to own such a dog, it's your responsibility, whatever occurs because of it, not the animals.
This is a tragedy all around.

Well now Simbi I have to respectively partially disagree with you on this one. I agree that the dog was not evil or anything and it probably thought it was playing or hunting or something.  It's a terrible thing to have happened, I also noticed the dog was from a rescue shelter, you never know what those dogs have been through and in all honesty the shelters should warn people of possible dangers.

BUT we always had large dogs, my best friend was a big Golden Labrador who was bought as a puppy only a few weeks before I was born. We grew up together and he always liked to play and took care of me. We used to sleep on the wool rug in the lounge. If the doorbell went he would bark, but if I ran to the front door (as kids do) and he saw a stranger near me he would go into a protective mode and act and look scary although if I shouted at him to shut up he would stop barking but would not leave my side. Since then my parents had 2 more kids and always had Labradors. Now there is my little niece that goes round to my parents and the current dogs are great with her, and she also has 2 dogs at her house.
I think the benefits of having a great dog as a pet far out-way any negatives. It's just a tiny handful of horrible instances where things go wrong. There are an estimated 8.5 million dog owners in the UK and in the last 12 months 4 people have been killed by dogs. That's obviously 4 too many but compared to how many humans killed humans I think I'd rather we had more dogs then people.

_EDIT_

Also I don't think the parent was being cruel by stabbing the dog, they were just trying to stop it from killing their kid. Those muscle bound dogs would barley even feel kicks and punches and with no gun the next best weapon would have been a knife.

Edited by bulveye, 06 November 2013 - 03:06 PM.

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#8    Moon Gazer

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 03:55 PM

This is just heartbreaking, that poor poor girl.  Her mum too, how devastating.

My own personal feelings on dogs is that I would never have one around my child that was too big or strong for me to physically drag it away.  Dogs are animals and need sufficient training, however in a lot of dog attacks we also hear how it was a "beloved family pet, protective of the kids and never hurt a fly".  So if a beloved family pet can turn, then I would want to be able to physically man handle a dog away from my kids if the worst ever happened.  Having said that, I work and don't have the time to commit to a dog so it's s mute point.

This dog was from a shelter so I guess it would be hard to know about the upbringing of the dog.


#9    Dark_Grey

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 04:10 PM

Dogs will put up with a surprising amount of crap from people, but just like people eventually they hit their limit. Unfortunately people buy dogs and treat them like pseudo-children which is pretty much the opposite of how you should treat a dog, simply based on a dog's natural pack instincts.

Your dog doesn't want a friend, he wants a leader. Case in point:

My wife and I have two dogs. One she has had since he was a puppy, (he's 11 now,) and one we bought together a year and a half ago, also as a puppy. My wife bought "her" dog as a present for herself during her teen years. As you can imagine, a teen doesn't have much interest (or time,) in properly training a dog. So this dog grew up being coddled and treated like royalty.

Does the dog love my wife? Of course.
Does he respect her? Not at all.

By constantly giving her dog affection and never treating the dog like a dog, the dog eventually sorted out the chain of command in his head. "She's always showing me affection and sharing her food with me...I must be her superior!"

The puppy we bought last year, I immediately started training from day 1. Established boundaries (no furniture, not allowed in the master bedroom, kenneled,) taught him to properly walk on and off the leash, NEVER used treats to train him (treat training typical means your dog is trained well - only if there's treats) and generally just treated him like a dog, but a respected member of the family. The difference between our two dogs is like night and day. Her's spends most of the day whining constantly because he wants her affection, he's very demanding in the kitchen, loses his mind when she leaves, etc.

With "mine" I freely leave my bedroom door open and he will sit at the threshold, I can take him off leash anywhere, anytime and he knows to come when I call him, and so on. Let me tell you, he is one balanced, happy dog :tu:

Long rant I know, but the moral of the story is your dog wants to be a dog! Dogs display human-like emotions so well even I sometimes forget they're animals with instincts and 42 sharp teeth. The key is remembering the latter at all times.

Edited by Dark_Grey, 06 November 2013 - 04:12 PM.

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#10    Yes_Man

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:01 PM

The dog was not ffrom a rescue shelter, though questions would of been asked as this type of dog is not ment to be with young children


#11    George Ford__AKA Bulveye__

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:21 PM

View PostThe New Richard Nixon, on 06 November 2013 - 05:01 PM, said:

The dog was not ffrom a rescue shelter, though questions would of been asked as this type of dog is not meant to be with young children

It was from a shelter;- "Family friend Paul Ryan said the dog had been picked up from a rescue center two months ago by Miss Hudson, who thought it had ‘a very soft nature’."

Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2jt3l713W

I agree that its a bad choice for having round a kid but I guess he seemed fine to the parents, they say it seemed soft and loving but then just snapped for some reason. There are other breeds known to be a lot more placid around kids. Like Labradors for instance.

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#12    kannin

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 06:41 PM

if its my child or a dog in that situation i would have eliminated it quickly, i know it would do massvive dmg before i could but i would have tried to kill it right away not wrestle it, and im a firm dog lover my dobbies are treated with respect not like coat wearing fashion statements and they are family and love my children and i love them but i would kill them in an instant if it was between them and my children, but parents neeed to smarten up

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#13    Simbi Laveau

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 07:14 PM

View Postkannin, on 05 November 2013 - 11:49 PM, said:



agreed, but id still demolish that dog just for the reason if i lost a kid i would lose my mind, but i do raise mine around dobermans but they learned and i taught them how to respect the dogs, this should be taught to children before a large possibly dangerous dog is braught into the home
Well that' a gut reaction, but it's not the animals fault.
I'd rather do it to a human who abuses an animal, as they do that knowingly and consciously.
That guy who abused that dog in Boston, his name is etched on my machete.....
Ahem.
But I digress....

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#14    Simbi Laveau

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 07:16 PM

View Postbulveye, on 06 November 2013 - 05:21 PM, said:



It was from a shelter;- "Family friend Paul Ryan said the dog had been picked up from a rescue center two months ago by Miss Hudson, who thought it had ‘a very soft nature’."

Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2jt3l713W

I agree that its a bad choice for having round a kid but I guess he seemed fine to the parents, they say it seemed soft and loving but then just snapped for some reason. There are other breeds known to be a lot more placid around kids. Like Labradors for instance.
Yeah. I love pitties, but with the animals I already have, bad idea.
I intend to rescue a couple of greyhounds someday.
Someday

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#15    Moon Gazer

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 08:10 AM

View Postkannin, on 06 November 2013 - 06:41 PM, said:

if its my child or a dog in that situation i would have eliminated it quickly, i know it would do massvive dmg before i could but i would have tried to kill it right away not wrestle it, and im a firm dog lover my dobbies are treated with respect not like coat wearing fashion statements and they are family and love my children and i love them but i would kill them in an instant if it was between them and my children, but parents neeed to smarten up

I'm sure with hindsight the mother would be wishing she had killed the dog straight away but I guess it's just gut instinct to try and grab the dog away from the child.  I think my instict would be to try and get the dog off the child and only when realising it wasn't working look for another option.

Reports I have read have said the girl was home ill and was sleeping on the sofa so I have no idea what could have provoked the dog.  Very sad indeed :(





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