Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Neolithic carpenters in East Germany


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1    jmccr8

jmccr8

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,172 posts
  • Joined:30 Oct 2009
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:29 PM

I came across this article last night,it's about Neolithic wooden structures in East Germany.This type of work was not done with metal tools and the construction method is quite interesting.

   PLOS ONE: Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture

jmccr8


#2    Piney

Piney

    Educated Redskin

  • Member
  • 2,745 posts
  • Joined:22 Jul 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hopewell, New Jersey

  • Redbonz Stumpjumper from the swamps of Shamong

Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:38 PM

I forgot about PLOS one.

There are "wet sites" in Florida now showing some serious Archaic woodworking skill. But most doesn't survive so all we knew was the lithic technology. Of course the lithic "tool kit" of Archaic cultures is fairly large so I would imagine that stone age people were good carvers and woodworkers.

Nice find!

Token Nanticoke
http://woodlandindia...orums/index.php
It takes a certain amount of sophistication to live primitive. Stupid people usually don't survive...............

"There aren't any Indians in New Jersey. Just some inbred ******* that live in the woods."

-Donald Trump

#3    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 6,208 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 21 November 2013 - 12:53 PM

Cool j,   this shows that some wood building and joining  techniques  go  wayyyyyy back.

I always wondered if  some of us  might have gone through a more extensive Wood building phase than realized,   before building with Stone.     Wood Henge preceded  Stone Henge.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#4    Piney

Piney

    Educated Redskin

  • Member
  • 2,745 posts
  • Joined:22 Jul 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hopewell, New Jersey

  • Redbonz Stumpjumper from the swamps of Shamong

Posted 21 November 2013 - 01:00 PM

View Postlightly, on 21 November 2013 - 12:53 PM, said:

Cool j,   this shows that some wood building and joining  techniques  go  wayyyyyy back.

I always wondered if  some of us  might have gone through a more extensive Wood building phase than realized,   before building with Stone. Wood Henge preceded  Stone Henge.

View Postlightly, on 21 November 2013 - 12:53 PM, said:

Cool j,   this shows that some wood building and joining  techniques  go  wayyyyyy back.

I always wondered if  some of us  might have gone through a more extensive Wood building phase than realized,   before building with Stone. Wood Henge preceded  Stone Henge.

I think so. But organic materials don't keep well. I saw some woodwork collected by Swedish settlers from my tribe in the 1630s and it was some seriously good stuff. It went down hill after that though. The stuff from the 1800s looks "unfinished" and there was a lot less care and detail in it's making.

Token Nanticoke
http://woodlandindia...orums/index.php
It takes a certain amount of sophistication to live primitive. Stupid people usually don't survive...............

"There aren't any Indians in New Jersey. Just some inbred ******* that live in the woods."

-Donald Trump

#5    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 6,208 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 21 November 2013 - 07:58 PM

View PostPiney, on 21 November 2013 - 01:00 PM, said:

I think so. But organic materials don't keep well. I saw some woodwork collected by Swedish settlers from my tribe in the 1630s and it was some seriously good stuff. It went down hill after that though. The stuff from the 1800s looks "unfinished" and there was a lot less care and detail in it's making.

      I'd like to see some of that.    What sort of   woodwork  were they making ?

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#6    Razer

Razer

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,458 posts
  • Joined:26 Dec 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Edge

Posted 21 November 2013 - 10:17 PM

Very cool too see wooden structures in such a good state after all that time.


#7    Piney

Piney

    Educated Redskin

  • Member
  • 2,745 posts
  • Joined:22 Jul 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hopewell, New Jersey

  • Redbonz Stumpjumper from the swamps of Shamong

Posted 22 November 2013 - 12:49 AM

View Postlightly, on 21 November 2013 - 07:58 PM, said:

  I'd like to see some of that. What sort of   woodwork  were they making ?
Some presentation war clubs that are now housed in Skokloster Castle in Sweden. I don't think there are any pics online. But you'll find pictures in the Bulletin of the Archaeology Society of New Jersey, No.50 and both books on the Lenape written by Herb Kraft.

Token Nanticoke
http://woodlandindia...orums/index.php
It takes a certain amount of sophistication to live primitive. Stupid people usually don't survive...............

"There aren't any Indians in New Jersey. Just some inbred ******* that live in the woods."

-Donald Trump

#8    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 6,208 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:50 AM

Thanks Piney, I found these pics online...    I don't know much, i was just curious what sorts of things they were making.  
I did notice bark  houses  similar to ones they used to use around here... (Michigan)

http://www.woodlandi...collection.html
Attached File  297_castle_war_club.jpg   10.88K   7 downloads

  ************
Attached File  00me7.jpg   9.98K   7 downloads

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#9    Piney

Piney

    Educated Redskin

  • Member
  • 2,745 posts
  • Joined:22 Jul 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hopewell, New Jersey

  • Redbonz Stumpjumper from the swamps of Shamong

Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:58 AM

View Postlightly, on 22 November 2013 - 01:50 AM, said:

Thanks Piney, I found these pics online... I don't know much, i was just curious what sorts of things they were making.  
I did notice bark  houses  similar to ones they used to use around here... (Michigan)

http://www.woodlandi...collection.html
Attachment 297_castle_war_club.jpg

  ************
Attachment 00me7.jpg

The Nishnabs (Ojibway) in Michigan are probably our "parent" population. The Nanticoke and other Southeastern and Central Algonquian languages are closer related to Ojibway than Northeastern Algonquian. The archaeological record points to a migration from that area, down into the Ohio Valley then to the Chesapeake and Delaware Bay area, then down to the Carolinas. Linguistic evidence points to the same.

Token Nanticoke
http://woodlandindia...orums/index.php
It takes a certain amount of sophistication to live primitive. Stupid people usually don't survive...............

"There aren't any Indians in New Jersey. Just some inbred ******* that live in the woods."

-Donald Trump

#10    jmccr8

jmccr8

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,172 posts
  • Joined:30 Oct 2009
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:22 PM

Hi,

  I found a couple of more articles on Neolithic wood structures.one is from England and the other is from Orkney,they are quite different in construction style.

    Four Neolithic houses unearthed at quarry - Archaeology News from Past Horizons : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

   Stone Pages Archaeo News: Mystery Neolithic wooden structures in Orkney

  I also found another article on Neolithic structures in the Levant dating to 9000-9500bc they are mud brick with a plaster coating

Neolithic Period -- Ancient History Encyclopedia

jmccr8





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users