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10,000B.C. Asteroid Impact & Lost Golden Age

graham hancock joe rogan golden age

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#1    leviathon007

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 08:29 PM

Video

What do you guys think of this? I've been following this topic for a few years and there does seem to be a conensus emerging that there was a very significant impact around 12,000 years ago, which would have triggered massive floods and might be related to all of these deluge "myths" found universally throughout almost all cultures across the globe.

And after reading Graham Hancock's work it seems fairly likely that civilizations formed long before we previously thought possible. They talk about Gobekli Tepe and another site that are already re-writing the story.

In addition to these "fall of humanity myths" there is countless recollections of a time where things were much better (i.e. before the impact/floods). This would make sense, and would even be expected if this impact did indeed occur. Any halfway decent civilization or city that existed before then would have seemed incredible in comparison to the rough living that came after.

I think its interesting how the mainstream view is of linear and steady progress in one direction, when really it seems more likely that the human story has ups and downs, and ebbs and flows just like other processes in nature.

(p.s. not sure how to embed the vid?)


#2    freetoroam

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 08:45 PM

The earliest documented members of the genus Homo are Homo habilis which evolved around 2.3 million years ago;

Posted Image

Yep, long before.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#3    leviathon007

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 09:07 PM

Can you elaborate please?


#4    cormac mac airt

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 09:35 PM

View Postleviathon007, on 29 November 2013 - 08:29 PM, said:

Video

What do you guys think of this? I've been following this topic for a few years and there does seem to be a conensus emerging that there was a very significant impact around 12,000 years ago, which would have triggered massive floods and might be related to all of these deluge "myths" found universally throughout almost all cultures across the globe.

And after reading Graham Hancock's work it seems fairly likely that civilizations formed long before we previously thought possible. They talk about Gobekli Tepe and another site that are already re-writing the story.

In addition to these "fall of humanity myths" there is countless recollections of a time where things were much better (i.e. before the impact/floods). This would make sense, and would even be expected if this impact did indeed occur. Any halfway decent civilization or city that existed before then would have seemed incredible in comparison to the rough living that came after.

I think its interesting how the mainstream view is of linear and steady progress in one direction, when really it seems more likely that the human story has ups and downs, and ebbs and flows just like other processes in nature.

(p.s. not sure how to embed the vid?)

Except that the evidence suggests that the claimed "massive" floods didn't all happen at the same time. 12,000 BP is 10,000 BC. The collapse of Glacial Lake Agassiz-Ojibway didn't happen until c.6470 BC while the Noregga Slide that destroyed Doggerland and separated Great Britain from the European mainland happened a couple hundred years later, c.6200 BC. Even the Black Sea Flood post-dates the mentioned 10,000 BC date, having occurred c.7400 BC. And while these events were "massive" or "sudden" on a geological scale, the rise in sea level was neither of those in comparison to a human timeframe.

Structures such as those at Gobekli Tepe are, on their own, not evidence of a civilizaton. Criteria for which already exists and from what's been discovered at Gobekli Tepe those criteria have yet to be met.

One has to wonder how things were "much better" considering that before each of the previously mentioned events above humanity was still having to deal with the after-effects of the last glacial period. As well as some of the megafauna that still existed for a couple of millenia after the Pleistocene ended. And farming (domesticated agriculture) hadn't even started yet. That doesn't remotely sound like a "Golden Age" to me.

cormac

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#5    Beany

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 12:11 AM

Wondering if there were a series of cataclysms occurring over a longer period of time. As I understand from reading about Atlantis a long time ago, the supposition was that there were earth changes that happened over at least a couple of hundred years, if not longer. Long enough so that there was time for migration, according to Churchwarden's book about Mu. I read somewhere that the earth's crust was still relatively unstable, and that instability caused a lot of land mass upheavals, volcanic activity, etc. But I came across this so long ago I don't remember the sources, except for Churchwarden.


#6    cormac mac airt

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 12:40 AM

View PostBeany, on 30 November 2013 - 12:11 AM, said:

Wondering if there were a series of cataclysms occurring over a longer period of time. As I understand from reading about Atlantis a long time ago, the supposition was that there were earth changes that happened over at least a couple of hundred years, if not longer. Long enough so that there was time for migration, according to Churchwarden's book about Mu. I read somewhere that the earth's crust was still relatively unstable, and that instability caused a lot of land mass upheavals, volcanic activity, etc. But I came across this so long ago I don't remember the sources, except for Churchwarden.

Hello Beany,

Reading the above I have to wonder if you're not perhaps conflating the two stories (i.e. Atlantis and Mu)? Setting aside Churchward's idea of Mu (which is an entirely different story) the story of Atlantis rests solely on the writings of Plato which, if one were to take it as a real place, was destroyed almost literally overnight. I'd think it rather difficult to confuse "overnight" with "a couple of hundred years". It should also be mentioned that with the core-drilling that's been done by the ODP and DSDP from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge to the Straits of Gibraltar, samples of which have been dated back hundreds of thousands to millions of years, there's never been any evidence found of a sizable location having disappeared into the depths of the northern Atlantic (east of the MAR) as mentioned by Plato, particularly within human history.

cormac

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#7    jaylemurph

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:16 AM

View Postleviathon007, on 29 November 2013 - 08:29 PM, said:

I think its interesting how the mainstream view is of linear and steady progress in one direction, when really it seems more likely that the human story has ups and downs, and ebbs and flows just like other processes in nature.

This is called teleological error -- where a writer or critic assumes that there is a pre-supposed or pre-arranged and purposeful development, a specific "progress" -- in the way events fall out. And while it is a fault virtually endemic to fringe history writers, it is closely monitored and condemned in peer-reviewed, academic history.

Fringe historians generally betray their wide-ranging ignorance of the actual practice of history when they -- or the people who quote them, as here -- assume the idea of linear, purpose-driven history is currently espoused in historical practice. (Although to be fair, it is a trait of older /discredited/ history: the Cambridge School, responsible for mytho-historical teleological development in The Golden Bough for example, certainly took this error and ran with it, but I don't know anyone who seriously recommends The Golden Bough as either a textbook example of history or mythological exegesis.)

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Deeply venial

#8    docyabut2

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:25 AM

View Postleviathon007, on 29 November 2013 - 08:29 PM, said:

Video

What do you guys think of this? I've been following this topic for a few years and there does seem to be a conensus emerging that there was a very significant impact around 12,000 years ago, which would have triggered massive floods and might be related to all of these deluge "myths" found universally throughout almost all cultures across the globe.

And after reading Graham Hancock's work it seems fairly likely that civilizations formed long before we previously thought possible. They talk about Gobekli Tepe and another site that are already re-writing the story.

In addition to these "fall of humanity myths" there is countless recollections of a time where things were much better (i.e. before the impact/floods). This would make sense, and would even be expected if this impact did indeed occur. Any halfway decent civilization or city that existed before then would have seemed incredible in comparison to the rough living that came after.

I think its interesting how the mainstream view is of linear and steady progress in one direction, when really it seems more likely that the human story has ups and downs, and ebbs and flows just like other processes in nature.

(p.s. not sure how to embed the vid?)

Tiny balls of fungus and feces may disprove the theory that a huge space rock exploded over North America about 12,900 years ago,


http://news.national...ge-extinctions/



Mysterious Black Mats on Earth Not From Outer Space


http://news.yahoo.co...-190401558.html


Comet Theory Comes Crashing to Earth.


http://www.psmag.com...to-earth-31180/


No Evidence for Clovis Comet Catastrophe, Archaeologists Say.

http://www.scienceda...00929171815.htm


Absence of evidence for a meteorite impact event 13,000 years ago


http://www.eurekaler...a-aoe120709.php


Comet impact theory disproved


http://www.bristol.a.../2009/6123.html


#9    kane9

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:38 PM

I remember how long it took for the K-T boundary impact which ended the dinosaurs save for birds to become accepted. We are still in an early stage of discovery and rebuttal on this hypothesis. I find an impact event interesting as a possible explanation for both the demise of the Clovis culture and the decimation of the megafauna. Something significant happened at the end of the last ice age that did not happen at the end of previous ice ages and as the Clovis First theory (and therefore the Overkill theory) continues to fail, this field was ripe for a new hypothesis.


#10    sards

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 06:37 PM

Agree re the ebb and flow theory.  
As was suggested by a friend.  Earth is in constant change.  Like dough in a mixer bowl.  It turns into itself constantly.  Changing.  Renewing itself . Why couldn't it be the same for us.





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