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Paul Knutson expedition - 1355


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#1    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 04:33 AM

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King Magnus of Norway and Sweden authorized the Paul Knutson expedition, which sailed in 1355 to explore conditions in Greenland and Vinland.


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Paul Knutson (nōōts´ən), fl. 1354–64, Norse leader, alleged explorer of America. In1354 or 1355 King Magnus VII of Norway directed him to conduct an expedition toGreenland to insure the continuity of Christianity there. He is said to have set out in1355 and returned in 1363 or 1364.


http://www.historyan...Section=1161468

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Paul_Knutson

I've been trying to find more info about this apparent expedition and there is scarce little to be found (seems many of the records were lost due to the black death, etc). But it does seem more than likely that it did sail. Knowledge of "vinland" was seemingly quiet well known of during this era, due to trade and the such. I was wondering if anyone had any good links about the subject (or just information) which do not involve templar conspiracy theories... :)

The Norse explorations and settlements and resourcing of north america (1000-1500s) is an area of interest of mine and I am always looking to expand my horizons. :) Cheers and thanks for the replies in advance. :innocent:

Edited by Bavarian Raven, 09 December 2013 - 04:36 AM.


#2    DieChecker

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 04:55 AM

First I've heard of it.

Excellent thread!

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#3    Nighthawk9653

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 05:55 AM

Sounds interesting, but sad to say I don't know anything about it :/
Just wondering, but did they call Iceland Vinland too?

Anyways, great topic :D

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#4    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 02:07 PM

View PostNighthawk9653, on 09 December 2013 - 05:55 AM, said:

Sounds interesting, but sad to say I don't know anything about it :/
Just wondering, but did they call Iceland Vinland too?

Anyways, great topic :D



#5    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 02:11 PM

Nope. Iceland was Iceland. Greenland Greenland ( which was quiet green during the summer months). Helluland was Baffin and northern Labrador. Markland was southern Labrador and most likely Newfoundland. Vinland was most likely the Gulf of St Lawrence region (where there was both pasture land and several species of wild grapes). :)

Interesting side note - the Bishops of Greenland were titled: "the Bishop of Greenland and lands to the west " by the church ;)

Edited by Bavarian Raven, 09 December 2013 - 02:12 PM.


#6    lakeview rud

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:36 AM

Raven, this doesn't directly adress your inquiry but, since you are a  Canadian, you may be interested in the Peterbourough Petroglyphs site just outside of Petersborough, Ontario.  There is a large outcropping of limestone rock there which appears to have Norse or Viking inscriptions including a number of boats that don't look like native canoes. A fellow named Barry Fell wrote a book (Bronze Age America) in which he theorized that the Norse visited North America long ago in search of copper.  Fell's ideas have since been rejected by mainstream archeologists( he was a Phd. professor in Biology somewhere) but I find it interesting that the Petersborough site would be located on an ancient Indian trail from Lake Huron to Lake Ontario.  In fact, circa 10,000 BC the ancient Lake Algonquin drained eastward to Lake Ontario starting at a point a bit NE of Lake Simcoe. This trail is still almost entirely navigable by canoe with only a few short portages.  Also of note is that Fell claimed to have deciphered an ancient Norse written language which used dots or lines.  He then proceeded to interpret a number of such incriptions throughout North America.  In any event this info may or may not be of use to you.  Good Luck.


#7    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 05:30 PM

@ above, i have heard of them...not sure what to make of them atm. Cheers.


#8    Gingitsune

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:44 PM

Your first link hint heavily that Vinland is around Cape Cod, but the saga point towards Newfoundland. L'Anse-aux-Meadows was found following the saga's instruction, there is little doubt that Newfoundland was part of Vinland, if only as the northen most tip. But there are another interesting piece of evidence from a German monk in a 11th century report:

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THE historical record is further evidence that Newfoundland is Vinland. The very earliest report still available to us is that of Adam of Bremen, a German monk who was at the court of the king of Denmark from whom he obtained the information that Vinland was an island and so published it about A.D.1075. The simple sentence, "Vinland is an island," contains two clues: One is, of course, the word "island." Secondly, the Norse used the morpheme "land" to mean a land mass of considerable size. Look at their other uses of that morpheme in this connection: Jutland (the peninsula and much of Denmark), England, Scotland, Shetland, Iceland and Greenland. As can be seen, each of these are sizeable and distinct bodies. None are villages. and neither are they continents. Leif Eriksson continued this manner of speaking in naming Helluland and Markland.

Vinland is both an island and a "land." The only island west of Greenland which is large enough to be called a land is Newfoundland.

I recommand you this great essay on Vinland location:
http://www.ensignmes...ml<br /><br />But it doesn't seem the l'Anse-aux-Meadows settlement was used more than a few decades.

On the other hand, some reassessment of Parks Canada's collection and archeological sites have hinted at least one Norse commercial oupost in Nunavut which worked for centuries (and maybe three others). Here's a report from the Nature of Things:
http://www.cbc.ca/na...-arctic-mystery

And the Civilisations Museum dossier:
http://www.civilisat...<br /> <br /> And the National Gegraphic report:
http://news.national...<br /> <br /> I don't have much more time right now, I'll link it all back to Paul Knutson in my next post.


#9    jaylemurph

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:43 AM

I don't know where that first quote comes from, but it's got some hinky linguistics, like trying to discuss a (Old?) Norse morpheme and the throwing out a string of (Modern, and not even Early Modern!) English words as evidence.

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