Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Could life on Mars have come from Earth?


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 14,162 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 04:37 PM

I dithered about posting this on the ET forums...but, if the article has any truth I guess it is ET related, Im sure the mods will decide.

So, we have all heard of panspermia on Earth...OK. Now, what if it worked the other way round too? What if Earth seeded other planets? See what the BBC said

Dinosaur asteroid 'sent life to Mars'

The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs may have catapulted life to Mars and the moons of Jupiter, US researchers say.

They calculated how many Earth rocks big enough to shelter life were ejected by asteroids in the last 3.5bn years. The Chicxulub impact was strong enough to fire chunks of debris all the way to Europa, they write in Astrobiology.

Thousands of potentially life-bearing rocks also made it to Mars, which may once have been habitable, they add.

"Any missions to search for life on Titan or the moons of Jupiter will have to consider whether biological material is of independent origin, or another branch in Earth's family tree."

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-25201572



.

Edited by seeder, 11 December 2013 - 04:41 PM.

It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#2    bison

bison

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,740 posts
  • Joined:13 Apr 2011

Posted 11 December 2013 - 04:45 PM

It's possible that life on Mars seeded life on Earth. Mars presumably cooled to a life-friendly temperature sooner than our planet, being far less massive. As the study referred to shows, more rocks travel inward through the solar system than outward. Mars gravity is substantially less than that of Earth, which further favors material being blasted off it, and onto Earth.


#3    scowl

scowl

    Government Agent

  • Closed
  • 4,111 posts
  • Joined:17 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 11 December 2013 - 04:46 PM

Why can't both planets seed life to each other multiple times?


#4    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 14,162 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:00 PM

Yeh it would be very confusing wouldn't it - if we ever did find evidence of life nearby...and traced it back to earth organisms...

It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#5    spacelizard667

spacelizard667

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 422 posts
  • Joined:16 Jul 2013
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Up here in this tree.

  • What is the more fun, inviting a wolf to dinner or having a tiger by it's tail ?

Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:23 PM

I seriously doubt that there is any real credence or merit to this science report.


#6    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 14,162 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:50 PM

View Postspacelizard667, on 11 December 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:

I seriously doubt that there is any real credence or merit to this science report.

Like what may I ask? That we were not hit by a massive asteroid? And that chunks could not have been blown into space?

It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#7    Spacenut56

Spacenut56

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 506 posts
  • Joined:26 May 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spokane, Washington

Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:51 PM

View Postseeder, on 11 December 2013 - 04:37 PM, said:

I dithered about posting this on the ET forums...but, if the article has any truth I guess it is ET related, Im sure the mods will decide.

So, we have all heard of panspermia on Earth...OK. Now, what if it worked the other way round too? What if Earth seeded other planets? See what the BBC said

Dinosaur asteroid 'sent life to Mars'

The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs may have catapulted life to Mars and the moons of Jupiter, US researchers say.

They calculated how many Earth rocks big enough to shelter life were ejected by asteroids in the last 3.5bn years. The Chicxulub impact was strong enough to fire chunks of debris all the way to Europa, they write in Astrobiology.

Thousands of potentially life-bearing rocks also made it to Mars, which may once have been habitable, they add.

"Any missions to search for life on Titan or the moons of Jupiter will have to consider whether biological material is of independent origin, or another branch in Earth's family tree."

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-25201572



.
I would agree, that that assumption could be entirely true about Earth "seeding" other planets as well as them seeding us..


#8    scowl

scowl

    Government Agent

  • Closed
  • 4,111 posts
  • Joined:17 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 11 December 2013 - 06:08 PM

View Postseeder, on 11 December 2013 - 05:50 PM, said:

Like what may I ask? That we were not hit by a massive asteroid? And that chunks could not have been blown into space?

Have any experiments shown that the seeds of life can survive in the harsh conditions of outer space for months or years? I haven't kept up with this.


#9    Hazzard

Hazzard

    Stellar Black Hole

  • Member
  • 11,762 posts
  • Joined:25 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Inside Voyager 1.

  • Being skeptical of the paranormal is a good thing.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 07:10 PM

View Postscowl, on 11 December 2013 - 06:08 PM, said:

Have any experiments shown that the seeds of life can survive in the harsh conditions of outer space for months or years? I haven't kept up with this.

The best candidates to act as “seeds of life” are bacterial spores, which allow bacteria to remain in a dormant state in the absence of nutrients. Bacteria constitute about one-third of Earth’s biomass and are characterized by their ability to survive under extreme conditions—those that we initially believed were unable to support life. In light of panspermia, the important question is if bacteria or bacterial spores could survive in space.

More here - http://scienceinsoci...nspermia-theory

I still await the compelling Exhibit A.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. -Edmund Burke

#10    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 14,162 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 07:29 PM

View PostHazzard, on 11 December 2013 - 07:10 PM, said:

The best candidates to act as “seeds of life” are bacterial spores, which allow bacteria to remain in a dormant state in the absence of nutrients. Bacteria constitute about one-third of Earth’s biomass and are characterized by their ability to survive under extreme conditions—those that we initially believed were unable to support life. In light of panspermia, the important question is if bacteria or bacterial spores could survive in space.

More here - http://scienceinsoci...nspermia-theory

and in case the article isnt read, another quote -

From the article

To address this question, scientists at the German Aerospace Centre in Cologne designed experiments using the Russian FOTON satellite. They mixed bacterial spores with particles of clay, red sandstone, Martian meteorite or simulated Martian soil to make small lumps a centimeter across. The lumps were then exposed via the satellite to outer space.

After two weeks of exposure, researchers found that nearly all of the bacterial spores mixed with red sandstone were able to survive. Another study showed that bacterial spores could survive the extreme conditions of outer space for six years if they were protected from extraterrestrial solar UV radiation. This would be possible if the spores traveled within comets or meteorites.

However, interplanetary distances are large, so the time a bacterial spore would have to spend in a meteorite or comet before hitting a host planet could range in the millions of years. Two studies involving the isolation of bacterial spores, either from the abdomen of extinct bees preserved in amber or from a brine inclusion in an old salt crystal from the Permian Salado formation, suggest that bacterial spores can remain viable for up to 250 million years. Thus, bacterial spores could potentially account for life on earth.

It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#11    scowl

scowl

    Government Agent

  • Closed
  • 4,111 posts
  • Joined:17 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 11 December 2013 - 08:06 PM

Six years isn't a lot of time for space travel. Having them hide inside meteorites for hundreds of years is possible but that would require some luck, especially since we're talking about a violent explosion that put them there.

The bacterial spores in the Permian Salado formation sound like they were protected from the elements which is the opposite of outer space. I certainly believe that you can protect spores and even viruses in amber.


#12    spacelizard667

spacelizard667

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 422 posts
  • Joined:16 Jul 2013
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Up here in this tree.

  • What is the more fun, inviting a wolf to dinner or having a tiger by it's tail ?

Posted 11 December 2013 - 10:06 PM

So microbes or bacteria would seem somehow to be the superior life forms and don't necessarily need a spacesuit to survive that journey ?  Then why are we spending millions of tax dollars, instead of transforming into bacterial hybrids, to prove that humans are the dominant lifeforms ?   I still say that is nutty.

Edited by spacelizard667, 11 December 2013 - 10:07 PM.


#13    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 14,162 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 12 December 2013 - 12:57 PM

Humans in space need life support, food, heat and water... microbes...by their very name being a microscopic organism... dont require the same. Heck some live deep inside rocks and get all the stuff they need right there

have you heard of Endoliths?

quote:

An endolith is an organism (archaeum, bacterium, fungus, lichen, algae or amoeba) that lives inside rock, coral, animal shells, or in the pores between mineral grains of a rock. Many are extremophiles, living in places previously thought inhospitable to life. They are of particular interest to astrobiologists, who theorize that endolithic environments on Mars and other planets constitute potential refugia for extraterrestrial microbial communities.

As water and nutrients are rather sparse in the environment of the endolith, they have a very slow reproduction cycle. Early data suggests that some only engage in cell division once every hundred years. In August 2013 researchers reported evidence of endoliths in the ocean floor with a generation time of 10,000 years. Most of their energy is spent repairing cell damage caused by cosmic rays or racemization, and very little is available for reproduction or growth. It is thought that they weather long ice ages in this fashion, emerging when the temperature in the area warms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endolith


.

Edited by seeder, 12 December 2013 - 12:57 PM.

It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#14    Chris374

Chris374

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2013

Posted 12 December 2013 - 03:37 PM

Or life on Earth comes from Mars... maybe that's more true?

In my mind I think life is everywhere in the unviverse and comes with water and oxygen.
:yes:


#15    IBelieveWhatIWant

IBelieveWhatIWant

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 344 posts
  • Joined:03 Feb 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 12 December 2013 - 03:45 PM

View Postseeder, on 11 December 2013 - 05:50 PM, said:

Like what may I ask? That we were not hit by a massive asteroid? And that chunks could not have been blown into space?

Well there is another thesis to how the dinosaurs died, they died from the Deccan Traps erupting causing the air and water to become uninhabitable, also possibly what Chris374 said. Life could have come from Mars to Earth so testing any microbes from Mars could very well give off a Earth reading but they could still be originally from Mars.

It is well known that Mars was like Earth millions of years ago, not a stretch to say Earth was "seeded" by Mars.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users