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New species of tapir discovered


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 01:48 PM

Scientists have identified a new species of endangered dwarf tapir living in the Amazon rainforest.

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Despite extensive studies and expeditions the vast expanses of the Amazon rainforest continue to throw up surprises. The latest is a new species of tapir, a large quadrupedal mammal that would seem impossible to have remained hidden for so long, especially given its size.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...apir-discovered

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#2    YukiEsmaElite0

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 02:28 PM

We could train tapirs like dogs and keep them as pets. They wouldn't go extinct then. They aren't violent are they?


#3    paperdyer

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 05:03 PM

We can form the ATC, the tapir version of the AKC.  Sounds like a great money-maker.  Sell the tapirs to the rich and PETA as "this years's hot must have item".


#4    RedSquirrel

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 06:26 PM

I do hope there is a chance for the tapir, all kinds. I think they are amazing.

Now, for something we hope you really like, try "True Facts: The Tapir"  *Caution, silly and adult language*

Posted Image   I support the majestic Pacific Northwest tree Octopus.

#5    Xynoplas

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 06:59 PM

Don't get your knickers in a knot here, mates. :)

Every once in a while, we have been seeing new species "discovered" in remote areas. The truth is that these are not usually new discoveries at all.

Your basic zoology or ecology undergrad has got to write his thesis on something. They go someplace remote and they start studying animal species until they find some variation that they might be able to identify as a distinct species. Great, they write their paper, they get their PhD, and go on to teach science in a junior college somewhere.

In most cases, these "new species" have been running around, perfectly visible to the locals and tourists alike. Until now, nobody's bothered to name them as a new species.

The final step is for a science reporter to blow the whole thing out of proportion.

And all the crytologists go crazy, pointing to this as proof that their favorite monster still lives in the lake in their backyard.

http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-three-new-lizard-species-discovered-in-peru-101766

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Well, maybe not entirely new— these lizards were known to exist, but had previously been categorized as being part of a different species group. However, the international team has produced evidence that indicates that the scaly critters are actually three separate species that deserve scientific recognition.

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/11/27/new-species-wild-cat-found-prowling-brazil/

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Scientists had previously identified four sub-populations of tigrina, including the southern tigrina, which lives primarily in Brazil’s mountainous forests, and the northeastern tigrina, which lives in savannahs and grasslands. The coat of the northeastern tigrina is slightly lighter, and the rosettes are sightly smaller, than those of its southern relative.


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#6    Xynoplas

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 07:02 PM

http://doubtfulnews....r-this-century/
Now, Bigfoot and cryptozoology sites are heralding this new animal as a triumph. I’m going to call out their baseless argument. The finding of this tapir is not cryptozoology and like the olinguito, does NOT provide them with any more hope for cryptids to be found. Why? Well, let’s compare. Bigfoot vs tapir. We already know there are tapirs. This is just a variation – an important one but not an animal that people are going to make mystery shows about.

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#7    Yes_Man

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 07:07 PM

View PostXynoplas, on 19 December 2013 - 06:59 PM, said:

Don't get your knickers in a knot here, mates. :)

Every once in a while, we have been seeing new species "discovered" in remote areas. The truth is that these are not usually new discoveries at all.

Your basic zoology or ecology undergrad has got to write his thesis on something. They go someplace remote and they start studying animal species until they find some variation that they might be able to identify as a distinct species. Great, they write their paper, they get their PhD, and go on to teach science in a junior college somewhere.

In most cases, these "new species" have been running around, perfectly visible to the locals and tourists alike. Until now, nobody's bothered to name them as a new species.

The final step is for a science reporter to blow the whole thing out of proportion.

And all the crytologists go crazy, pointing to this as proof that their favorite monster still lives in the lake in their backyard.

http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-three-new-lizard-species-discovered-in-peru-101766


http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/11/27/new-species-wild-cat-found-prowling-brazil/
Wrong, if you catch 10 tapir, 4 6 of which are adults and the same size, the other 4 are smaller than the 6 but the 4 are the same size as a new species or sub species. Which means that the gene or dna is different, not much but different from the rest
Same with Zebra, theres I think 7 different types of Zebra.

Edited by The New Richard Nixon, 19 December 2013 - 07:09 PM.


#8    Xynoplas

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 07:28 PM

You need a sample size of at least 30 to make this statistically significant.

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#9    Yes_Man

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 07:32 PM

View PostXynoplas, on 19 December 2013 - 07:28 PM, said:

You need a sample size of at least 30 to make this statistically significant.
I know, but for arguments sake


#10    Artaxerxes

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 10:06 PM

Tapirs closest living relatives are horses and   rhinoceroses.  They evolved from a common ancestor with horses.  They are members of the Perissodactyla or odd toed ungulates. They are hind gut fermenters.





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