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why would we have no memories


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#1    sards

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 04:32 PM

Of advanced civilisations of the past.  
There was written language.  Surely this skill should have been developed and memories passed down.


#2    cormac mac airt

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 04:38 PM

View Postsards, on 22 December 2013 - 04:32 PM, said:

Of advanced civilisations of the past.  
There was written language.  Surely this skill should have been developed and memories passed down.

We have writing developing c.3100/3200 BC by the Egyptians and Sumerians. What is it you expect from before then?

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#3    DieChecker

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:13 PM

I agree, that if there were even more ancient advanced cultures in the world, then the ancient Egyptians and Mesoptamians, then we'd have an oral tradition of them, plus piles of artifacts. The lack of artifacts is what convinces me.

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#4    questionmark

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:29 PM

If we find no evidence of an older culture there was no such a thing. We are even to capable of finding tribal hamlets dating from 20,000 or more years ago, so the only reason for not finding anything is: There was nothing.

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#5    The_Spartan

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:40 PM

What exactly do you mean by "memories"?
Written? oral?
Memories when written or transmitted orally are not "memories" anymore, they are records.

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#6    Harte

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 02:21 AM

Though the earliest written language we know of is Sumerian cuneiform, there was a point not too long ago when we had no knowledge of the existence of that civilization.

What I mean is that just because a culture had a written language and a joint mythology, that certainly doesn't imply that we should know about them.

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#7    sards

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 03:46 AM

Correct about the memories translating into records. It is almost as though humanity decided to take a holiday after for example the great pyramids were built.


#8    shadowsot

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 04:35 AM

View Postsards, on 23 December 2013 - 03:46 AM, said:

Correct about the memories translating into records. It is almost as though humanity decided to take a holiday after for example the great pyramids were built.
Not exactly. The main pyramid builders were int eh 4th Dynasty, as a signs of their power as much as anything. The pyramids were build at a time of unequaled peace, prosperity, and stability in Egypt, that the later Dynasties didn't quite hit again.
You also have the refocusing from great pyramids to the temples, something that started during the 4th dynasty.

If you really look at pyramids without all the New Age woo that gets added to them, while impressive monuments they are not amazing in terms of architecture. The Temples, which also had the record of the accomplishments of the pharaohs inscribed in them, outshone the pyramids in terms of construction and materials used.

And Kmt should (hopefully kindly) point out how I've got this wrong.

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#9    sards

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 07:04 AM

I am just amazed that we have to guess about everything.


#10    Frank Merton

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 07:18 AM

I read somewhere that the pyramids served as a way to absorb excess labor supply in a country which, because of the Nile, had large numbers of seasonally unneeded workers.  A sort of make-work program.


#11    sards

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 02:18 PM

Pyramids don't interest me.  It is inanimate.  Quarrried blocks stacked randomly ontop of each other.  Blah.
The fact that so much supposed intelligence was harvested to create these atrocities and then lost in time because we were too stupid to grow intellectually after wards amuses me.

Edited by sards, 23 December 2013 - 02:19 PM.


#12    Taun

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 02:45 PM

View Postsards, on 23 December 2013 - 02:18 PM, said:

Pyramids don't interest me.  It is inanimate.  Quarrried blocks stacked randomly ontop of each other.  Blah.
The fact that so much supposed intelligence was harvested to create these atrocities and then lost in time because we were too stupid to grow intellectually after wards amuses me.

Just curious as to why you seem to think they are/were "atrocities", and what intelligence was 'harvested' and how?...


#13    sards

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 03:09 PM

They really are ugly structures.  Maybe when new , yes. And they really do seem pointless.  Some mans ego at the cost of a lot of lives.



#14    AtlantisRises

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 06:19 PM

Just because you aren't capable of seeing a point in no way makes something pointless.

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#15    jaylemurph

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 06:56 PM

View Postsards, on 23 December 2013 - 02:18 PM, said:

Pyramids don't interest me.  It is inanimate.  Quarrried blocks stacked randomly ontop of each other.  Blah.
The fact that so much supposed intelligence was harvested to create these atrocities and then lost in time because we were too stupid to grow intellectually after wards amuses me.

The fact you mention a lack of intellectual growth and called the Pyramids "blocks stacked randomly ontop [sic] of each other" is a joke, right, or are you just the most irony-resistant poster to come along since Zoser?

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