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Mars One selection to be a reality TV show

mars one shortlists human colony mars

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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 02:08 PM

The organisers of the Mars One project are hoping to broadcast a 'Big Brother' style TV series.

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When Mars One announced that it was offering people the opportunity to take part in a one-way trip to the Red Planet, few could have predicted that by the time applications had closed there would be more than 200,000 volunteers signed up.

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#2    Ashyne

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 03:48 PM

Am I the only one who has a problem with an 81-year-old being successfully accepted into the finals? There are many reasons why there should be a much lower age limit for Mars astronauts:

1) Most of the older folks who sign up for this think of this as a final "thing to do before I die" task that they hope to accomplish before they leave this world (pun intended).

Are they really serious about this, or do they think that since this is a permanent, one-way trip to Mars, and they might die of old age any time soon, they really have nothing much to lose.

2) People above a certain age are prohibited by law from doing certain things, such as driving, because their bodies are generally more frail and susceptible to damage and stress than younger people, and their senses are not in as good condition.

An astronaut's health and fitness is the most important thing, followed by training experience. Because to walk on an alien planet places huge physical and psychological stress on an astronaut's body and mind, and older people are more prone to stress-related disorders which would affect their performance as an astronaut.

3) As with any permanent, one-way trip to another planet, astronauts are supposed to live out the rest of their lives there. A young astronaut of 20-30 years old would have to spend approximately 40-60 years of this life on Mars.

Within this time period of 40-60 years, more astronauts would slowly trickle in as technology for colonization progresses, until a full colony is established. This means that for 40-60 years, the pioneering astronauts have to keep the primary outpost running.

If an 80 year old astronaut is sent there, he would probably, on average, live only 10-20 years more. Which means his capacity to sustain the outpost is one-third the amount as compared to a younger astronaut. He would die out before the next batch of astronauts reaches Mars, as the pioneering batch would also be monitored to test the effects of colonization on the colonists, this takes at least 10-20 years to observe bodily changes (physical/psychological).

4)The final size of the pioneering batch of astronauts would be a small one. This means every astronaut is extremely important. If elderly astronauts are lost to death by old age before they are able to contribute significantly, the Mars colonization program would be severely crippled (since as I mentioned before, regarding the time it takes for a new batch to come in, which is at least 10-20 years, because colonists must be monitored for any health effects for this period of time before risking another batch of astronauts).

There are no reasons at all (not even the amount of training experience) that would make an elderly astronaut more suitable as a candidate than a younger one.


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 04:49 PM

View PostAshiene, on 02 January 2014 - 03:48 PM, said:

There are no reasons at all (not even the amount of training experience) that would make an elderly astronaut more suitable as a candidate than a younger one.
That is just plain wrong.

There are extremely good reasons why younger astronauts should not be sent to Mars at the moment and why older candidates should be selected (although I will concede that 81 is a little excessive, especially as the launch is still 12 years away).

The radiation doses that astronauts receive on their way to Mars have the potential to cause cancer. This cancer will not manifest itself immediately but will occur decades later. If you send a crew of 20 - 30 years olds to Mars then there is a increased probability that they will develop cancer in their sixties and seventies. If you send a group of 50 and sixty year olds then, because they are less likely to live as many decades, the amount of life shortening cancers as a result of the flight are reduced.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 05:01 PM

To back up my point, here are two articles arguing for older astronauts to be sent to Mars:

This story from the Daily Mail in 2010 contains the following:

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'You would send a little bit older folks, around 60 or something like that,' Schulze-Makuch said.

The is because the mission would undoubtedly reduce a person's lifespan, from a lack of medical care and exposure to radiation.

Radiation could also damage reproductive organs, so sending people of childbearing age is not a good idea, Schulze-Makuch said.

Whilst this story, from The Conversation, about Denis Tito's project to send a couple on a mission to Mars and back (without landing) says:

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Being elderly myself, I have an informed view. Older for Tito apparently means infertile, or at least beyond wishing to have children. Of course most men remain fertile until they die, as Charlie Chaplin proved. So, conceivably (no pun intended) we are thinking about men and women beyond “a certain age” – let’s say 50.

Apart from the psychological issues it is difficult to shield astronauts from damaging cosmic radiation on the long trip, but oldies can be sacrificed because we have little to lose. Think of it as voluntary euthanasia – if the worst happened it would be a spectacular way to go.


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#5    diablo_04

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 06:09 PM

Its all about the money, no ones give a **** about exploring only ratings :angry:

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#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 06:20 PM

View Postdiablo_04, on 02 January 2014 - 06:09 PM, said:

Its all about the money, no ones give a **** about exploring only ratings :angry:
If that is the case then why is this a "not for profit" company?

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#7    diablo_04

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:01 PM

There no "not for profit" reality tv

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#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:49 PM

View Postdiablo_04, on 02 January 2014 - 07:01 PM, said:

There no "not for profit" reality tv
I am no fan of this project and I doubt that it will ever get off the ground, but I base my opposition on facts not on whatever random nonsense comes into my head.

Your argument so far has been a fact free zone. Let's introduce some reality shall we?

It won't surprise you that if you are going to send people to Mars you can't do it for free. It requires funding... a lot of funding (Mars One estimates $6 billion). If you are not going to receive government funding then you have to find another source.

Mars One intends to use reality TV as part of that source.

Now that is not to say that the TV companies that buy the reality show aren't interested in profit and ratings, but they are separate entities. Mars One is NOT a TV company and it IS a not for profit organisation.

From Mars One's web site:

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About Mars One

Mars One is a not-for-profit foundation that will establish a permanent human settlement on Mars.
(my emphasis).
Source:  About Mars One

Quote

Mars One intends to gain funds to send humans and cargo to Mars by using a variety of ways. As Mars One is a private and not a governmental initiative, it gives anyone interested in the mission the possibility to cooperate in realising the mission. The targeted means of funding are as follows:

[list][*]Exclusive partnerships
[*]Sponsorships
[*]Sales of broadcasting rights
[*]Involvement with high net worth individuals
[*]Revenues from Intellectual Property
[*]Crowdfunding
Source:  What is the Mars One business model?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#9    moonshadow60

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:56 PM

Old people are not going to volunteer in droves, believe me.  I wouldn't go up there if I was paid and there was a way to spend the money.  Besides; the life span on Mars could be about 3 seconds, for all we know, and things could go very wrong before the people even get there.


#10    Mbyte

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:59 PM

I can easily imagine a reality TV unfolding of Doom 3. Or in more realistic terms, an sad and slow painful watch as all the astronauts go insane


#11    pallidin

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 08:23 PM

With their time-line, money resourses, and not to mention the serious complexity, I see this as a "No Go"


#12    Ashyne

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 08:30 PM

View PostMbyte, on 02 January 2014 - 07:59 PM, said:

I can easily imagine a reality TV unfolding of Doom 3. Or in more realistic terms, an sad and slow painful watch as all the astronauts go insane

I believe it is more likely that the astronauts become John Carters of Mars and take up arms against an oppressive empire.

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#13    pallidin

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 08:40 PM




#14    moonshadow60

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:29 PM

I love that song, Pallidin.


#15    toast

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:55 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 02 January 2014 - 07:49 PM, said:

I am no fan of this project and I doubt that it will ever get off the ground, but I base my opposition on facts not on whatever random nonsense comes into my head. Your argument so far has been a fact free zone. Let's introduce some reality shall we?
It won't surprise you that if you are going to send people to Mars you can't do it for free. It requires funding... a lot of funding (Mars One estimates $6 billion). If you are not going to receive government funding then you have to find another source.
Mars One intends to use reality TV as part of that source. Now that is not to say that the TV companies that buy the reality show aren't interested in profit and ratings, but they are separate entities. Mars One is NOT a TV company and it IS a not for profit organisation.

I would like to clean up the non-profit organization fairy tale here. As per M1 HP, M1 is a "Dutch Stichting" a non-profit organization and legal entity with a limited liability but with tax benefits. "Non-profit organization" always sounds beneficent and is always a wallet opener. M1 has a CRO, it´s co-founder Bas Lansdorp.

As per M1 HP: “The graphic below highlights how the revenues have been invested. Please note that the income from donations and merchandise have not been used to pay salaries.”  That means, we have no information if, for example, the salary for the CEO will be paid in future from this resource also and if yes, how much.

As per HP M1, M1 generated by donations and merchandising USD138k until OCT2013 and that´s simply nothing looking at the target of USD6B. In case the project will be ended early, and I´m sure it will, due to missed target in funding all the earned money that was not invested within the fiscal year, will be kept within the foundation. And that opens the option that, for example, the CEO can skim this money by increasing the salary or by bonus payment to keep the foundation in the yearly management analysis = non-profitable as salaries and bonus are listed as emissions in the gross profit analysis report. And as the foundation has a limited liability, so the CEO, no money can be claimed back.

The whole Mars-One project is just designed to earn lots of money for a few, nothing else.

Ulrich Walter, a German former ESA astronaut and ISS1 crew member stated in an interview about Mars 1 : “I think the budgeting and the time schedule as well are absolute unrealistic.”


Edited by toast, 02 January 2014 - 10:55 PM.

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