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Divers uncover relics of Stone Age 'Atlantis'


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 12:19 PM

Stone Age artifacts left behind by Swedish nomads have been unearthed on the floor of the Baltic Sea.

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Divers have uncovered a treasure trove of artifacts off the coast of Sweden dating back more than 11,000 years. The team had been diving in the bay of Han when they discovered the items that are thought to have been preserved by the lack of oxygen and abundance of sediment on the ocean floor.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...ne-age-atlantis

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#2    third_eye

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 12:35 PM

I wonder if they found my stone axe from my previous life ?

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#3    Hasina

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 01:00 PM

Amazing the lost artifacts of people long since forgotten being found in such an environment, I know the area wasn't flooded when they were nomad-ing around but it must have been a harsh and nearly unforgiven life style, all that's left are these tools and bits of bones. Archeology, you humble me.

Edited by Hasina, 28 January 2014 - 01:02 PM.

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#4    Myles

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 02:14 PM

Who else hates when they always use the "Atlantis" angle?   Good gads!   Can't we just be in awe of a new discovery without comparing it to a fictional island?


#5    Myles

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 02:15 PM

I was in my back yard last summer.   I was digging a hole for my clothes line.   I found an atlantis-like arowhead.


#6    Atlantisresearch

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:09 PM

View PostMyles, on 28 January 2014 - 02:14 PM, said:

Who else hates when they always use the "Atlantis" angle?   Good gads!   Can't we just be in awe of a new discovery without comparing it to a fictional island?

The view Plato's Atlantis is not entirely fiction has academic credibility, even if not mainstream. As classicist John V. Luce wrote: "Many of those who begin by calling Atlantis a fiction end up finding deeper levels of truth in the story".

It is annoying though that the term Atlantis is slopped on underwater archaeology news articles (Japan, Sweden, Italy, wherever...)


#7    Calibeliever

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:15 PM

View PostMyles, on 28 January 2014 - 02:14 PM, said:

Who else hates when they always use the "Atlantis" angle?   Good gads!   Can't we just be in awe of a new discovery without comparing it to a fictional island?
Agreed, I thought the same thing. The word Atlantis was used to grab attention but has nothing to do with this truly outstanding find.

Tip of the hat to these guys. The already difficult task of discovery is made so much harder by being underwater.


#8    LimeGelatin

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:17 PM

How come in the movies the Atlantians are always portrayed as being a highly advanced civilization capable of possessing technologies as great as the ones we currently use today or possibly even greater, but whenever some scientist wants to waste millions of some investors dollars to explore a find that could possibly lead to the lost city of Atlantis all they can bring home is some technologies that the Native Americans were capable of coming up with 200 yrs. ago?


#9    Myles

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 06:36 PM

View PostOliverDSmith, on 28 January 2014 - 05:09 PM, said:

The view Plato's Atlantis is not entirely fiction has academic credibility, even if not mainstream. As classicist John V. Luce wrote: "Many of those who begin by calling Atlantis a fiction end up finding deeper levels of truth in the story".

It is annoying though that the term Atlantis is slopped on underwater archaeology news articles (Japan, Sweden, Italy, wherever...)

I know of no solid evidence that supports atlantis.


#10    jaylemurph

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:30 AM

View PostOliverDSmith, on 28 January 2014 - 05:09 PM, said:

The view Plato's Atlantis is not entirely fiction has academic credibility, even if not mainstream. As classicist John V. Luce wrote: "Many of those who begin by calling Atlantis a fiction end up finding deeper levels of truth in the story".

It is annoying though that the term Atlantis is slopped on underwater archaeology news articles (Japan, Sweden, Italy, wherever...)

Well, gosh, if one quote taken out of context from a non-historian on a historical subject says so, it  must surely be true.

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#11    kmt_sesh

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 03:03 AM

Terrific discovery, ridiculous title for the article. Yet another example of pandering to the uninformed to try to accumulate readership. Why not just say "…alien relics of Stone Age 'Atlantis'"? That would attract the Sitchin and von Däniken crowd, right? Nevertheless, it's an interesting find.

View PostOliverDSmith, on 28 January 2014 - 05:09 PM, said:

The view Plato's Atlantis is not entirely fiction has academic credibility, even if not mainstream. As classicist John V. Luce wrote: "Many of those who begin by calling Atlantis a fiction end up finding deeper levels of truth in the story".

It is annoying though that the term Atlantis is slopped on underwater archaeology news articles (Japan, Sweden, Italy, wherever...)

I don't know of any respected historian of ancient Mediterranean societies who views Plato's allegorical fable as credible history.

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#12    Atlantisresearch

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 09:29 AM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 29 January 2014 - 03:03 AM, said:

I don't know of any respected historian of ancient Mediterranean societies who views Plato's allegorical fable as credible history.

Contemporary? Well, John V. Luce only died three years ago and he was an academic proponent of the Thera-Cretan (Minoan) hypothesis. His book is what introduced me to Atlantis years back, although I don't myself support the Minoan theory. I'm not sure though what the other poster above means by "the quote taken out of context from a non-historian". Luce was a prominent historian and classics professor at Dublin University.

Naddaf (1994) summarizes: "the vast majority of classical scholars take the story to be what Plato explicitly denies it to be: invented myth (the serious exceptions to this rule are writers who adhere to the Thera-Cretan hypothesis)." The fact remains that these "serious exceptions" still exist in the case of John V. Luce.

Edited by OliverDSmith, 29 January 2014 - 09:31 AM.


#13    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:06 AM

View PostLimeGelatin, on 28 January 2014 - 05:17 PM, said:

How come in the movies the Atlantians are always portrayed as being a highly advanced civilization capable of possessing technologies as great as the ones we currently use today or possibly even greater, but whenever some scientist wants to waste millions of some investors dollars to explore a find that could possibly lead to the lost city of Atlantis all they can bring home is some technologies that the Native Americans were capable of coming up with 200 yrs. ago?
Edgar Cayce the (in)famous "sleeping prophet" claims he saw Atlantis with (basically) ray guns.
He started it, everyone believed him and ran with it. Platonic Atlantis is basically "county full of d********s".

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#14    Q-C

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:23 AM

Very cool!


Nilsson admitted that "lousy Swedish tabloids" had blown the story out of the water by labelling the find "Sweden's Atlantis", even though the remnants never belonged to an actual village. The people were all nomadic at the time, he explained, so there was no village.             Imagine that! I'm shocked.

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#15    Ryinrea

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 12:11 PM

View PostMyles, on 28 January 2014 - 02:14 PM, said:

Who else hates when they always use the "Atlantis" angle?   Good gads!   Can't we just be in awe of a new discovery without comparing it to a fictional island?
I hate that too it's aynoing. I am excited by this find even thought they were probaly nomadic tribes in the area at that time. Stone Age people were nomadic not city dwellers like us as such we shouldn't say they were city dwellers just saying. Althought I like the story of Alantis

Edited by Ryinrea, 29 January 2014 - 12:18 PM.

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