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Wolves Are Much Better Imitators Than Dogs

wolves dogs learning messerli research institute

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:17 PM

Although wolves and dogs are closely related, they show some striking differences. Scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken experiments that suggest that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. The scientists believe that cooperation among wolves is the basis of the understanding between dogs and humans.

http://www.scienceda...40131083410.htm

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#2    Sakari

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:25 PM

:tsu:

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#3    spacecowboy342

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:39 PM

Fascinating. I wonder if inbreeding during the domestication process could have had an effect on dog intelligence


#4    Lilly

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 05:07 PM

Something tells me that dogs fare better at observing and learning from humans than wolves do. I'd like to see this aspect studied.

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#5    g00dfella

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:36 AM

View PostLilly, on 02 February 2014 - 05:07 PM, said:

Something tells me that dogs fare better at observing and learning from humans than wolves do. I'd like to see this aspect studied.

Has been and they do.


#6    Sundew

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 03:28 AM

I would say wolves are better at learning a certain skill set that lets them survive in the wild. They probably learn survival skills from members of their pack or their parents, probably not unlike a pride of lions where the cubs learn hunting skills from their elders. Dogs have become so dependent on humans that they don't need to have these survival skills. They may have lost some of the ability to pick up on these cues from other dogs, and indeed several dogs kept together is not the same as a wolf pack with their Alpha hierarchy, aggression, dominance and submission, at least not anywhere at the level of their wild conterparts. It has been suggested that in breeding the wild wolf out of our domestic dog, we have at the same time bred into them traits that make them more "puppy like" even as adults, in both looks and temperament. In doing so we have shaped them and their companionship has shaped us in return.


#7    Sakari

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 05:17 PM

View PostLilly, on 02 February 2014 - 05:07 PM, said:

Something tells me that dogs fare better at observing and learning from humans than wolves do. I'd like to see this aspect studied.

Got to my signature link...

Watch the first video on page one.

We did not teach her how to open doors, she did it on her own. She opened the slider to let the dogs out. She walked on a leash like a trained Dog right away. Did not take her long to figure out anything.

Wolves are more intelligent,I think she taught us more then we ever taught her though.

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#8    Sakari

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 05:18 PM

View PostSundew, on 03 February 2014 - 03:28 AM, said:

I would say wolves are better at learning a certain skill set that lets them survive in the wild. They probably learn survival skills from members of their pack or their parents, probably not unlike a pride of lions where the cubs learn hunting skills from their elders. Dogs have become so dependent on humans that they don't need to have these survival skills. They may have lost some of the ability to pick up on these cues from other dogs, and indeed several dogs kept together is not the same as a wolf pack with their Alpha hierarchy, aggression, dominance and submission, at least not anywhere at the level of their wild conterparts. It has been suggested that in breeding the wild wolf out of our domestic dog, we have at the same time bred into them traits that make them more "puppy like" even as adults, in both looks and temperament. In doing so we have shaped them and their companionship has shaped us in return.

Dogs still have the pack mentality, and we are in their pack. The " wild " is there, I see it every day in any dog.

The only difference is their pack is humans, and in a different environment.

Wolves do the same thing, only with each other.

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#9    MoorWalks

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:08 PM

I was looking at the Sarrloos, the Czechoslovakian wolf or the Utonagon after we lost our German Shepherd but the only thing that put me off them was the distance I would have to bring a young dog back to our home, the better breeders are located in the Orkney's or way down on the south coast. I felt it cruel to transport a puppy that far.

I found a local Alaskan Malamute breeder and picked up our new family member, Loki. i do need to share his photos with you all here on UM.

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#10    Oppono Astos

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:21 PM

Wolf intelligence/knowledge builds with age and their position within the pack, domesticated dogs retain the intelligence of a pup thru their lives.

Who is the skeptic: the realist who won't accept belief, or the believer who won't accept reality?

#11    Sakari

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:02 PM

View PostOppono Astos, on 03 February 2014 - 08:21 PM, said:

Wolf intelligence/knowledge builds with age and their position within the pack.

:tu:

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