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The Shocking Behavior of a Speedy Star

kappa cassiopeiae hd 2905 supergiants infrared astronomy spitzer nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 02:21 PM

The Shocking Behavior of a Speedy Star


www.jpl.nasa.gov said:

Roguish runaway stars can have a big impact on their surroundings as they plunge through the Milky Way galaxy. Their high-speed encounters shock the galaxy, creating arcs, as seen in this newly released image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

In this case, the speedster star is known as Kappa Cassiopeiae, or HD 2905 to astronomers. It is a massive, hot supergiant moving at around 2.5 million mph relative to its neighbors (1,100 kilometers per second). But what really makes the star stand out in this image is the surrounding, streaky red glow of material in its path. Such structures are called bow shocks, and they can often be seen in front of the fastest, most massive stars in the galaxy.

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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#2    Merc14

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 02:30 PM

I had no idea such things even existed.  Thanks!  Why would one star travel faster than another, especially a star as massive as this one?  Are the a lot of these fast stars and do they often collide with slower moving stars?  What effect would a star as massive as this ine have on a solar system it crosses paths with??  What a nightmare to hage a massive star on a collision course with your home system.  Guess I have some studying to do.

Edited by Merc14, 21 February 2014 - 02:33 PM.

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#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 02:57 PM

View PostMerc14, on 21 February 2014 - 02:30 PM, said:

Why would one star travel faster than another, especially a star as massive as this one?
That would depend. Some may have been ejected from binary systems, others may have gravitational interacted with another, unrelated star.

View PostMerc14, on 21 February 2014 - 02:30 PM, said:

Are the a lot of these fast stars and do they often collide with slower moving stars?
Define "a lot". In a galaxy which contains between 100 billion and 400 billion stars there are bound to be a few.
As for collisions, they will be rare. Space is very big and stars are (comparatively) very small. Collisions are unlikely. Most collisions between stars are between members of binary systems and not a result of random impacts.

View PostMerc14, on 21 February 2014 - 02:30 PM, said:

What effect would a star as massive as this ine have on a solar system it crosses paths with??
Again it depends. If it passes close enough it could disrupt the orbits of planets. Some could spiral into their sun, others be ejected to become rouge planets.

A much more likely scenario is that it will pass at a greater distance where it won't disrupt the orbits of the planets, but will disrupt the Oort Cloud. This would eject a huge number of comets, but would also send many inwards to become comets.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    ThesillyfunnyguyIDK

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 03:18 PM

so Kappa Cassiopeiae is doing 1,100 kilometers per seconds? which is 66,000 per minute 396,0000 per hour

damn im so good in maths :nw:

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#5    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 03:42 PM

View PostSkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart, on 21 February 2014 - 03:18 PM, said:

damn im so good in maths :nw:
Congratulations on managing to do some very, VERY basic arithmetic.

You will have to be capable of doing more than multiplying by 60 before you can claim to be even average at maths.

Oh and by the way, your second result is wrong, it should be 3,960,000 Km/h

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 21 February 2014 - 08:34 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#6    Merc14

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 07:45 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 21 February 2014 - 02:57 PM, said:

That would depend. Some may have been ejected from binary systems, others may have gravitational interacted with another, unrelated star.


Define "a lot". In a galaxy which contains between 100 billion and 400 billion stars there are bound to be a few.
As for collisions, they will be rare. Space is very big and stars are (comparatively) very small. Collisions are unlikely. Most collisions between stars are between members of binary systems and not a result of random impacts.


Again it depends. If it passes close enough it could disrupt the orbits of planets. Some could spiral into their sun, others be ejected to become rouge planets.

A much more likely scenario is that it will pass at a greater distance where it won't disrupt the orbits of the planets, but will disrupt the Oort Cloud. This would eject a huge number of comets, but would also send many inwards to become comets.

I didn't even consider tehe OORT cloud interaction.

You asked for Obamamerica, now you are going to get it.  Stand by for suck or as Pelosi says, "Embrace the suck".




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