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Robotic Exploration of Moon & Mars

moon mars luna-25 phobos-grunt roscosmos

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 10:28 AM

Robotic Exploration of Moon, Mars a Priority – Roscomos


RIA Novosti said:

MOSCOW, March 4 (RIA Novosti) – The head of Russia’s space agency Roscosmos said Tuesday that developing technologies for robotic exploration of the moon and Mars is a priority.

Oleg Ostapenko said in an interview with state newspaper Rossiiskaya Gazeta that the agency would boost its unmanned space probe efforts ahead of three missions to the moon.

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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#2    keninsc

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 10:54 AM

While I think space programs are great for research, I have to wonder why the Russians would make robotic exploration of the Moon and Mars a priority when all the information that we get from our probes are pretty much free to anyone who wants to see it?

Granted, they can do as they wish but maybe they could focus on a different planet or even asteroids........just seems a little redundant to me, and the possibility of finding something super new and potentially Earth shattering (pardon the pun). Europa for instance seems to hold a great chance for finding something since it's covered by a relatively thin layer of ice and a possibly liquid layer beneath. That would be a scream to send a probe to, one to roll around on the surface and one to melt through to the liquid layer. Awesome!

Guess they don't have the vision they once did, huh?


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 11:20 AM

View Postkeninsc, on 05 March 2014 - 10:54 AM, said:

Guess they don't have the vision they once did, huh?

On the contrary.

To think that no new research or discoveries can be made on the Moon or Mars because others have already sent probes there is nonsense. The vast majority of the the surface of those worlds remain unexplored. Each lander or rover can only carry a limited number of instruments, so even those regions which have been explored have not been explored thoroughly.

Since the break up of the Soviet Union, Russia has attempted only two deep space missions, Mars'96 and Phobos-Grunt, both doomed by launch vehicle failures.

It should also be remembered that, although the Soviet Union had a long and successful history of Lunar and Venusian exploration it suffered a string of failures with it Mars exploration programme.

The fact that Roscosmos is now preparing to return to lunar and Martian exploration (independently as well as in partnership with the ESA Exo-Mars programme... which NASA withdrew from) and also as a partner with ESA's mission to explore Jupiter's icy moons, shows that Roscosmos has regained it's vision.

To do what you suggest, to simply sit back and let others do the exploring on the Moon and Mars, well that is so lacking in vision that it requires a guide dog.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    keninsc

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 11:51 AM

Wow, we really don't communicate well, do we?

:unsure2:





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