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Possible Exomoon Found

exoplanets exomoons gravitational microlensing nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 04:43 PM

Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found


www.jpl.nasa.gov said:

Titan, Europa, Io and Phobos are just a few members of our solar system's pantheon of moons. Are there are other moons out there, orbiting planets beyond our sun?

NASA-funded researchers have spotted the first signs of an "exomoon," and though they say it's impossible to confirm its presence, the finding is a tantalizing first step toward locating others. The discovery was made by watching a chance encounter of objects in our galaxy, which can be witnessed only once.

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#2    taniwha

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 07:01 PM

Great, now they might finally find an Exo crater.

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#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 07:16 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 11 April 2014 - 07:01 PM, said:

Great, now they might finally find an Exo crater.

It is difficult to know with you whether you are serious, attempting humour or deliberately being obtuse.

Just in case you are actually serious I have to ask, you do know that it is not currently possible to see surface details on even the closest, largest exoplanets don't you? In fact we can only see surface details on an extremely limited number of stars.

What does this tell you about the chances of seeing a crater on a tiny exomoon?

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#4    taniwha

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 07:36 PM

Bats can see clearly in the dark.  If we finetuned this technique our telescopes in theory could see distant details like craters. Generations would pass before we got a return signal thats the downside so the earlier we start on such a project the better.



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#5    Sundew

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 01:28 AM

View Posttaniwha, on 11 April 2014 - 07:36 PM, said:

Bats can see clearly in the dark.  If we finetuned this technique our telescopes in theory could see distant details like craters. Generations would pass before we got a return signal thats the downside so the earlier we start on such a project the better.

While bats can see in the dark with their eyes (blind as a bat is a myth), I do not know if bats see any better than any other nocturnal animal and likely not as well as some, like a cat. Bats use sound to visualize a "picture" of their world in a process called echolocation, they produce a high pitched sound wave, which bounces off objects and the resulting echo is picked up by their very sensitive specialized ears, and then probably converted into an image in their brains.

First, sound does not travel in a vacuum; even though space is not a perfect vacuum, it's close enough. Second sound travels considerably slower than light (767 miles per hour, is generally accepted for sound at sea level, in dry air vs 186,000 miles per second or about 669,600,000 miles per hour, give or take a mile, or about 873,012 x slower than the speed of light. So even if you could bounce sound waves off an exo-planet or exo-moon you might be waiting a very long time for that image.


#6    coolguy

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 03:45 AM

Can't they use the Hubble to see if these guys are right.if it is a moon that would be awesome


#7    taniwha

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 04:08 AM

View PostSundew, on 12 April 2014 - 01:28 AM, said:



While bats can see in the dark with their eyes (blind as a bat is a myth), I do not know if bats see any better than any other nocturnal animal and likely not as well as some, like a cat. Bats use sound to visualize a "picture" of their world in a process called echolocation, they produce a high pitched sound wave, which bounces off objects and the resulting echo is picked up by their very sensitive specialized ears, and then probably converted into an image in their brains.

First, sound does not travel in a vacuum; even though space is not a perfect vacuum, it's close enough. Second sound travels considerably slower than light (767 miles per hour, is generally accepted for sound at sea level, in dry air vs 186,000 miles per second or about 669,600,000 miles per hour, give or take a mile, or about 873,012 x slower than the speed of light. So even if you could bounce sound waves off an exo-planet or exo-moon you might be waiting a very long time for that image.

Yes of course any Batscope wouldnt use sound.  It would use pulses of light.  Have you ever heard of LIDAR?  The technology will someday map planetary terrains and atmospheres and maybe in the future, even exo solar systems.  

Quote

Technology that could someday “MapQuest” Mars and other bodies in the solar system is under development at Rochester Institute of Technology’s Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), in collaboration with Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory.

Three-Dimensional “super roadmaps” of other planets and moons would provide robots, astronauts and engineers details about atmospheric composition, biohazards, wind speed and temperature. Information like this could help land future spacecraft and more effectively navigate roving cameras across a Martian or lunar terrain.

http://www.eurekaler...t-lid051508.php

Of course this tech is not new but it has so far not reached its potential.  Could it map asteroids?  Yes. Could it be used to precisely measure distances to the stars?  Yes.   Could we build a lidar Batscope, fly it toward an exo-system,  in Alpha Centauri perhaps.

Yes I think we can.

Power input and output, and possibly finance could be an issue but challenge is part of the fun.


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#8    DieChecker

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 06:56 AM

Using a laser to map a far off solar system certainly is possible, but would require years of travel time, and incredible precision, and a receiver the size of a planet.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#9    taniwha

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 09:14 AM

View PostDieChecker, on 12 April 2014 - 06:56 AM, said:

Using a laser to map a far off solar system certainly is possible, but would require years of travel time, and incredible precision, and a receiver the size of a planet.

Excellent!  :clap: I love it when a plan comes together.

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#10    Harte

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 11:50 AM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 11 April 2014 - 07:16 PM, said:

It is difficult to know with you whether you are serious, attempting humour or deliberately being obtuse.

Just in case you are actually serious I have to ask, you do know that it is not currently possible to see surface details on even the closest, largest exoplanets don't you? In fact we can only see surface details on an extremely limited number of stars.
So, you agree they should name the planet "Parma," right?

https://www.youtube....h?v=HgGCO5eGdnE

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#11    JustTerri

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:37 AM

Its amazing how mysterious space is.


#12    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:50 AM

View PostJustTerri, on 13 April 2014 - 12:37 AM, said:

Its amazing how mysterious space is.
What is truly amazing is how much of what was once mysterious we can now comprehend. That we can detect moons orbiting planets around other stars is a mind blowing achievement.

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 14 April 2014 - 03:25 AM.
typo.

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#13    Kenemet

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 03:57 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 11 April 2014 - 07:36 PM, said:

Bats can see clearly in the dark.  If we finetuned this technique our telescopes in theory could see distant details like craters. Generations would pass before we got a return signal thats the downside so the earlier we start on such a project the better.

If I'm not mistaken, sound waves (like bats use) are a much larger wave than light waves... meaning that we'd see less if we squeaked at the moon.  I believe that radio astronomy is using the highest radio frequencies available, giving much finer detail of the objects.


#14    JesseCuster

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 06:10 PM

View PostKenemet, on 13 April 2014 - 03:57 PM, said:

If I'm not mistaken, sound waves (like bats use) are a much larger wave than light waves... meaning that we'd see less if we squeaked at the moon.  I believe that radio astronomy is using the highest radio frequencies available, giving much finer detail of the objects.
The lack of a medium to carry sound signals between the earth and the moon is a much bigger obstacle to using echolocation to image the moon than the resolving power of sound waves.  In fact, the idea of using bat-type echolocation for astronomy is utter lunacy to begin with.

Radio astronomy doesn't involve "using" radio frequencies like in sonar or radar.  Radio astronomy doesn't involving beaming out radio signals to objects and waiting for a return signal to read.  Radio telescopes observe EM radiation in the radio frequency portion of the EM spectrum that some astronomical objects emit.

The highest frequencies detected by any telescopes are in fact at the opposite end of the electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves (radio waves are at the low energy and low frequency end of the EM spectrum) - gamma rays and X-rays that the likes of the Chandra space telescope is designed to be sensitive to.

Edited by JesseCuster, 13 April 2014 - 06:12 PM.

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#15    spacecowboy342

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 11:58 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 13 April 2014 - 12:50 AM, said:

What is truly amazing is how much we of what was once mysterious we can now comprehend. That we can detect moons orbiting planets around other stars is a mind blowing achievement.


- Anatole France (1844 - 1924)
I've got to agree with that. When I was young such a thing would have been considered science fiction if not outright lunacy






Also tagged with exoplanets, exomoons, gravitational microlensing, nasa

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