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1st Earth-Size Exoplanet In 'Habitable Zone' [merged]

exoplanets habitable zone kepler-186f kepler nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:05 PM

NASA's Kepler Discovers First Earth-Size Planet In The 'Habitable Zone' of Another Star


www.nasa.gov said:

Using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" -- the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun.

While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth.

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#2    taniwha

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:30 PM

That is remarkable,  I wonder how long the day on this planet is and how many moons it has.  These two factors alone could tell us how Earthlike they really are.



#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:37 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 17 April 2014 - 10:30 PM, said:

These two factors alone could tell us how Earthlike they really are.
Why?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:48 PM


Kepler Discovers First Earth size Planet in the Habitable Zone of Another Star

NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a distant star, an area where liquid water might exist on its surface. The planet, Kepler-186f, is ten percent larger in size than Earth and orbits its parent star, Kepler-186, every 130 days. The star, located about 500 light-years from Earth, is classified as an M1 dwarf and is half the size and mass of our sun.

For more information about this discovery, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/kepler
For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames

Credit: NASA Ames Research Center

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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#5    taniwha

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:49 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 17 April 2014 - 10:37 PM, said:


Why?

Because of how day and night combine to influence and induce life.  We already know from its sun that it has a day but what can we say of its night?


#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 11:08 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 17 April 2014 - 10:49 PM, said:

Because of how day and night combine to influence and induce life.
This is meaningless!

Would you like to give some details? Why is the length of day important? Do you realise that the length of Earth's day has not always been 24 hours?
Why is the number of Moons important?

View Posttaniwha, on 17 April 2014 - 10:49 PM, said:

We already know from its sun that it has a day but what can we say of its night?
This is not just meaningless, it's nonsense!!

Do you actually know what night is? Do you not realise that any planet in orbit around a star must have day AND night? Even a tidally locket planet will have one side in constant day and one side in constant night.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    taniwha

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 11:39 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 17 April 2014 - 11:08 PM, said:


This is meaningless!

Would you like to give some details? Why is the length of day important? Do you realise that the length of Earth's day has not always been 24 hours?  Why is the number of Moons important?

If you are right and I suppose you are,  then it is you who is supposing that life existed during those times.  Cruicially I am meaning differences by hours of days and not merely seconds or minutes.  Do you not suppose the moon has not always been there as well?

Quote

This is not just meaningless, it's nonsense!!

Do you actually know what night is? Do you not realise that any planet in orbit around a star must have day AND night? Even a tidally locket planet will have one side in constant day and one side in constant night.

The universe is full of suprises and if nothing suprises you then  Maybe this will,  there could be planets tidally locked in the shadow of giant planets,  in essence being in a perpetual solar eclipse.  These planets would of course be rare,  maybe as rare as the Earth itself. In the case of the kepler 186f  i dont think its day cycle has been measured.

Edited by taniwha, 17 April 2014 - 11:40 PM.


#8    MissJatti

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 02:37 PM

to have life, Earth really does not require the moon.. but life may not evolve without the moon

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#9    ancient astronaut

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 03:28 PM

Cool discovery, not like we'll be seeing it anytime soon.

[media='funny-pic'][/media]

#10    ancient astronaut

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 03:34 PM

View PostSkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart, on 18 April 2014 - 02:37 PM, said:

to have life, Earth really does not require the moon.. but life may not evolve without the moon
I think what they (NASA) is looking for in requirements to planets in the "Goldilocks" zone is simply distance from it's sun in relation to Earth's distance from our sun, "not too hot, not too cold" "just right" on temps. That sort of thing. Moons are shielding agents primarily (they do other things as well, tides,etc.,) for the planet against comets,meteors etc., but I would think they are not necessary for life to evolve. I have never read anything that supports the lunar influences on evolution.

Edited by ancient astronaut, 18 April 2014 - 03:35 PM.

[media='funny-pic'][/media]

#11    MissJatti

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:19 PM

View Postancient astronaut, on 18 April 2014 - 03:34 PM, said:

I think what they (NASA) is looking for in requirements to planets in the "Goldilocks" zone is simply distance from it's sun in relation to Earth's distance from our sun, "not too hot, not too cold" "just right" on temps. That sort of thing. Moons are shielding agents primarily (they do other things as well, tides,etc.,) for the planet against comets,meteors etc., but I would think they are not necessary for life to evolve. I have never read anything that supports the lunar influences on evolution.

your take on this link, about our moon, and our evolution....just a speculation!!

http://www.sciencein...13/issue26/moon

Edited by SkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart, 18 April 2014 - 06:19 PM.

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#12    Calibeliever

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:32 PM

Astonishing. When I was a young man we could only speculate about whether or not planets existed around other stars. There was no conceivable way to prove it.  Now we have the ability to detect one the size of our little rock 500 light years away. Simply incredible.


#13    taniwha

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 07:51 PM

View PostSkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart, on 18 April 2014 - 06:19 PM, said:



your take on this link, about our moon, and our evolution....just a speculation!!

http://www.sciencein...13/issue26/moon

Enjoyable read thanks.  

It isnt unreasonable to assume that a moon is essential to being Earthlike or even lifelike.

We do know for certain that life doesnt exist on the two only moonless planets in our solar system, Mercury and Venus.  
Atmospherically and geologically Venus is alive and kicking but we know the chances of biological life are next to zero.  

Interestingly to consider also the Venus day is actually longer than its year!  By a matter of moments.   There is a theory that perhaps Mercury was the Venus moon, taken as an infant by the Sun.  Just how might a moon change Venus?   Could a moon be the pendulum for life?

http://curiosity.dis...day-longer-year


#14    Mikenator

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 08:09 PM

The goldilocks zone? Couldn't they have come up with a better name that.


#15    taniwha

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 09:15 PM

View PostMikenator, on 18 April 2014 - 08:09 PM, said:

The goldilocks zone? Couldn't they have come up with a better name that.

Lol maybe the three bears zone ( sorry couldnt resist) lol

I agree with you though goldilocks zone has no appeal to me either.

Edited by taniwha, 18 April 2014 - 09:29 PM.





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