Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Astronomers Find Sun’s ‘Long-Lost Brother’

sun star formation hd 162826

  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,222 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 10 May 2014 - 12:12 AM

Astronomers Find Sun's "Long-Lost Brother," Pave Way for Family Reunion


The University of Texas at Austin said:

AUSTIN, Texas - A team of researchers led by astronomer Ivan Ramirez of The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first "sibling" of the sun — a star almost certainly born from the same cloud of gas and dust as our star. Ramirez's methods will help astronomers find other solar siblings, which could lead to an understanding of how and where our sun formed, and how our solar system became hospitable for life. The work appears in the June 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

"We want to know where we were born," Ramirez said. "If we can figure out in what part of the galaxy the sun formed, we can constrain conditions on the early solar system. That could help us understand why we are here."

Posted Image Read more...


Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 12 May 2014 - 01:55 PM.
fixed source link.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#2    taniwha

taniwha

    Hi. If im an idiot, then im an idiot for truth.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,910 posts
  • Joined:25 Sep 2012
  • Gender:Male

Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:13 AM

All the ingredients of the rare earth hypothesis exist within the milky way so this is awesome news.

" Where does yesterday go to? Where does tomorrow come from? Is not the universe the proginetor of space and time? "
                                                                        **Time-machine Universe**
                                                            http://www.unexplain...howtopic=286269

#3    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,222 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:52 AM

View Posttaniwha, on 10 May 2014 - 01:13 AM, said:

All the ingredients of the rare earth hypothesis exist within the milky way so this is awesome news.

What has this got to do with the "rare earth hypothesis"?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#4    aka CAT

aka CAT

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 831 posts
  • Joined:25 Jan 2014
  • Gender:Female

  • That, with God, all things are possible
    doesn't make everything equally probable.

Posted 10 May 2014 - 02:50 AM

When the orbits of sun and HD 162826 are run backward to their birthplace,
a Happy Birthday song will be in order.  Thence, the brother of the sun could
stand a nickname.  Being that he's in the constellation Hercules, :-? maybe
"Happy Birthday Herculean Dude and his brother, Happy Birthday to you..."


#5    taniwha

taniwha

    Hi. If im an idiot, then im an idiot for truth.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,910 posts
  • Joined:25 Sep 2012
  • Gender:Male

Posted 10 May 2014 - 05:20 AM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 10 May 2014 - 01:52 AM, said:

What has this got to do with the "rare earth hypothesis"?

The rare earth hypothesis describes the perfect place that a earth type planet might form and life can evolve.  The milky way matches the hypothesis.  And yet here we are.

" Where does yesterday go to? Where does tomorrow come from? Is not the universe the proginetor of space and time? "
                                                                        **Time-machine Universe**
                                                            http://www.unexplain...howtopic=286269

#6    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,222 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 12 May 2014 - 01:43 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 10 May 2014 - 05:20 AM, said:

The rare earth hypothesis describes the perfect place that a earth type planet might form and life can evolve.  The milky way matches the hypothesis.  And yet here we are.
Despite the fact that I explained it in very simple terms you really don't understand the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis at all.

The "Rare Earth" hypothesis is exactly what it's name suggests, a hypothesis that says planets like Earth are rare. It sets out a series of conditions which limit the probability of life existing else where in the Universe. These conditions are based on the conditions found on Earth. As the Earth is found in the Milky Way galaxy it stands to reason that the Milky Way galaxy MUST have the right conditions to find a planet like Earth. This is not some great revelation you have made here, it's simply a case of stating the bloody obvious.

The point of the "Rare Earth" hypothesis is not to say that the Milky Way is suitable for life... we already know that, it's to say that many other galaxies AREN'T.

Your statement is like saying that Waspie_Dwarf's cat lives in Waspie_Dwarf's living-room. That means that Wapie-Dwarf's house must have the correct condition's for Waspie_Dwarf's cat.. well d'uh! That goes without saying.

However just because the house is the perfect place to find the living room it does not mean that other rooms in Waspie_Dwarf's house MUST have cats. In fact the "Rare Earth" hypothesis would go further, it would say that is not enough to live in Waspie_Dwarf's house, the conditions must be the same as the living-room, hence finding further cats, even in Waspie_Dwarf's house are very unlikely.

If you had understood the "Rare Earth" hypothesis you would have understood that a galaxy very similar to the Milky Way is just one of many conditions that need to be met.

As usual your comment does nothing except advertise your total ignorance of the subject. As usual you did not answer the question asked which was:

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 10 May 2014 - 01:52 AM, said:

What has this got to do with the "rare earth hypothesis"?
Since it is virtually impossible to get a straight answer from you on anything I'll answer the question for you... The "Rare Earth" hypothesis has NOTHING to do with the article I posted.

Would it be too much to ask that you make on-topic comments? Since there is already a topic where the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis is being discussed I suggest that you use that if you wish to discuss it further.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#7    Junior Chubb

Junior Chubb

    Aqualish Dude

  • Member
  • 5,811 posts
  • Joined:28 Nov 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

  • I am Junior Chubb, son of the Chubb, father of Chubb III

Posted 12 May 2014 - 05:26 PM

Ouch!

I've flown from one side of this galaxy to the other. I've seen a lot of strange stuff, but I've never seen anything to show me where the hell Helen of Annoy has been for the past couple of months.

#8    ancient astronaut

ancient astronaut

    Conspiracy Theorist

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 901 posts
  • Joined:23 Jul 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:31 spooner street

  • It Is What It Is.

Posted 12 May 2014 - 05:27 PM

It amazes me how they(scientists) find this stuff out. Great find.

[media='funny-pic'][/media]

#9    Junior Chubb

Junior Chubb

    Aqualish Dude

  • Member
  • 5,811 posts
  • Joined:28 Nov 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

  • I am Junior Chubb, son of the Chubb, father of Chubb III

Posted 12 May 2014 - 05:52 PM

View Postancient astronaut, on 12 May 2014 - 05:27 PM, said:

It amazes me how they(scientists) find this stuff out. Great find.

Me too, there is proof, logic and evidence behind these kinds of finds/claims but I still find them unbelievable.

Great find, great article. :)

I've flown from one side of this galaxy to the other. I've seen a lot of strange stuff, but I've never seen anything to show me where the hell Helen of Annoy has been for the past couple of months.

#10    paperdyer

paperdyer

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,284 posts
  • Joined:04 May 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina

  • "The place where optimism flourishes the most is the insane asylum."

Posted 12 May 2014 - 06:57 PM

As amazing as this is, we still know more about outer space than the oceans and they're smaller.


#11    taniwha

taniwha

    Hi. If im an idiot, then im an idiot for truth.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,910 posts
  • Joined:25 Sep 2012
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:04 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 12 May 2014 - 01:43 PM, said:


Despite the fact that I explained it in very simple terms you really don't understand the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis at all.

The "Rare Earth" hypothesis is exactly what it's name suggests, a hypothesis that says planets like Earth are rare. It sets out a series of conditions which limit the probability of life existing else where in the Universe. These conditions are based on the conditions found on Earth. As the Earth is found in the Milky Way galaxy it stands to reason that the Milky Way galaxy MUST have the right conditions to find a planet like Earth. This is not some great revelation you have made here, it's simply a case of stating the bloody obvious.

The point of the "Rare Earth" hypothesis is not to say that the Milky Way is suitable for life... we already know that, it's to say that many other galaxies AREN'T.

Your statement is like saying that Waspie_Dwarf's cat lives in Waspie_Dwarf's living-room. That means that Wapie-Dwarf's house must have the correct condition's for Waspie_Dwarf's cat.. well d'uh! That goes without saying.

However just because the house is the perfect place to find the living room it does not mean that other rooms in Waspie_Dwarf's house MUST have cats. In fact the "Rare Earth" hypothesis would go further, it would say that is not enough to live in Waspie_Dwarf's house, the conditions must be the same as the living-room, hence finding further cats, even in Waspie_Dwarf's house are very unlikely.

If you had understood the "Rare Earth" hypothesis you would have understood that a galaxy very similar to the Milky Way is just one of many conditions that need to be met.

As usual your comment does nothing except advertise your total ignorance of the subject. As usual you did not answer the question asked which was:

Since it is virtually impossible to get a straight answer from you on anything I'll answer the question for you... The "Rare Earth" hypothesis has NOTHING to do with the article I posted.

Would it be too much to ask that you make on-topic comments? Since there is already a topic where the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis is being discussed I suggest that you use that if you wish to discuss it further.

That is a simple way of saying that no two planets are the same,  or that life is unique or the Earth is rare same thing.  Im not sure if the rare earth hypothesis even takes into account the possibility that We might be riddled with life and Earthlikes in our galaxy alone.

Technically of course you are correct so I have come up with my own idea called the Common Earth Hypothesis where the odds of Earth like planets are scattered abundantly through out our Milky Way.  





" Where does yesterday go to? Where does tomorrow come from? Is not the universe the proginetor of space and time? "
                                                                        **Time-machine Universe**
                                                            http://www.unexplain...howtopic=286269

#12    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,222 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 12 May 2014 - 10:55 PM

View Posttaniwha, on 12 May 2014 - 07:04 PM, said:

Technically of course you are correct so I have come up with my own idea called the Common Earth Hypothesis where the odds of Earth like planets are scattered abundantly through out our Milky Way.  

What part of the following was beyond your capacity to understand?

Quote

Since there is already a topic where the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis is being discussed I suggest that you use that if you wish to discuss it further.

And by the way it can only be your idea if you came up with it first, Since the belief that Earth like planets are common has existed for many MANY decades you really can not claim it as your idea.

Now, go back and re-read the posts Lilly and I made on the various hypothesis about life through the universe. Read them as many times as it takes for something to sink in. Then, if you have any more comments to make, make them in that thread, not this one. You will find it here: http://www.unexplain...howtopic=265845

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#13    Sundew

Sundew

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,508 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:An island by the sea.

  • Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectos Nunc

Posted 13 May 2014 - 01:21 AM

View Postpaperdyer, on 12 May 2014 - 06:57 PM, said:

As amazing as this is, we still know more about outer space than the oceans and they're smaller.

Yes, by just a tad :w00t:.!


#14    qxcontinuum

qxcontinuum

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,201 posts
  • Joined:28 Aug 2013
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:in between

  • The age of stupid is upon us. Scientific conclusions are drawn from missing data, resuming to suppositions and guessing.

Posted 13 May 2014 - 04:29 AM

Ohh c-mon... It is oviously not a reality. A supposition, maybe but nothing more.


#15    Astra.

Astra.

    Xanadu

  • Member
  • 3,808 posts
  • Joined:06 Feb 2014
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Home grown Gold Coaster.

  • We are in the cosmos - and the cosmos are in us.

Posted 13 May 2014 - 08:21 AM

View PostJunior Chubb, on 12 May 2014 - 05:26 PM, said:

Ouch!
Agree, how scathing :unsure2:

Posted Image




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users