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Milky Way has 100 million life-giving planets


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 01:28 PM

A group of astronomers has estimated the number of habitable planets in our galaxy for the first time.

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As the number of extrasolar planet discoveries increases, so too does our overall understanding of the nature and distribution of planetary bodies in our galaxy. It has long been speculated that there could be many more habitable Earth-like worlds spread out across the cosmos but determining exactly how many has remained something of a challenge.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...-giving-planets

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#2    MissJatti

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 02:21 PM

the real answer is..............*drumroll*......1

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#3    stevewinn

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 02:47 PM

i would bet life exists in our own solar system. they say liquid water is needed. so they concentrate on Mars when better alternatives exist such as the icy moons of Jupiter or Saturn. moons with liquid water - oceans under miles of frozen ice. instead of going to Mars get to these moons, its easier to land on a moon than plummeting through a atmosphere like Mars. If we're looking for life why are we still looking on Mars when every expert says liquid water is needed and Mars doesn't even have a puddle.

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 02:59 PM

View Poststevewinn, on 09 June 2014 - 02:47 PM, said:

If we're looking for life why are we still looking on Mars when every expert says liquid water is needed and Mars doesn't even have a puddle.
I would have thought the answer to that is blindingly obvious.

Firstly there is huge evidence that Mars was once covered in large oceans, making it a logical place to look for life.

Secondly it is far easier and far FAR cheaper to look for life a few centimetres below the surface of Mars than it is to look for life many kilometres below the ice on a distant moon in the outer solar system.

There simply is not yet the funding nor the technology to look for life on the moons of Jupiter or Saturn.

Put simply scientists are looking for life in the places where they CAN look for life. When the funding and technology are available they will expand their search and continue to look for life where they CAN look for life.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#5    bubblykiss

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 03:02 PM

If they do find complex life I only have two questions; how much of it is there and how delicious is it?


#6    Merc14

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 03:15 PM

View Poststevewinn, on 09 June 2014 - 02:47 PM, said:

i would bet life exists in our own solar system. they say liquid water is needed. so they concentrate on Mars when better alternatives exist such as the icy moons of Jupiter or Saturn. moons with liquid water - oceans under miles of frozen ice. instead of going to Mars get to these moons, its easier to land on a moon than plummeting through a atmosphere like Mars. If we're looking for life why are we still looking on Mars when every expert says liquid water is needed and Mars doesn't even have a puddle.

I think we concentrate on Mars because it is relatively close and once had large ammounts oof surface water and an oxygen atmosphere so is a good candidate for showing signs of past life.  Europa is very intriguing but is hard to get too and when we do we will be separated from the liquid water by several miles of ice.  That said, there are several proposed missions to Europa, like NASA Europa Clipper and the NASA/ESA EJSM/LaPlace that are being studied right now for launch in the future. Also, Jupiter puts out massive amounts of radiation and is hard on orbitting spacecraft making missions there even more expensive.

Edited by Merc14, 09 June 2014 - 03:28 PM.

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#7    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 03:18 PM

View Postbubblykiss, on 09 June 2014 - 03:02 PM, said:

If they do find complex life I only have two questions; how much of it is there and how delicious is it?
Two questions that will lead rather rapidly to your demise.

You really need to ask a third question given that it is possible for something to taste delicious and still be deadly poisonous.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#8    stevewinn

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 04:01 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 09 June 2014 - 02:59 PM, said:

I would have thought the answer to that is blindingly obvious.

Firstly there is huge evidence that Mars was once covered in large oceans, making it a logical place to look for life.

Secondly it is far easier and far FAR cheaper to look for life a few centimetres below the surface of Mars than it is to look for life many kilometres below the ice on a distant moon in the outer solar system.

There simply is not yet the funding nor the technology to look for life on the moons of Jupiter or Saturn.

Put simply scientists are looking for life in the places where they CAN look for life. When the funding and technology are available they will expand their search and continue to look for life where they CAN look for life.



View PostMerc14, on 09 June 2014 - 03:15 PM, said:

I think we concentrate on Mars because it is relatively close and once had large ammounts oof surface water and an oxygen atmosphere so is a good candidate for showing signs of past life.  Europa is very intriguing but is hard to get too and when we do we will be separated from the liquid water by several miles of ice.  That said, there are several proposed missions to Europa, like NASA Europa Clipper and the NASA/ESA EJSM/LaPlace that are being studied right now for launch in the future. Also, Jupiter puts out massive amounts of radiation and is hard on orbitting spacecraft making missions there even more expensive.

in reply to your good selves, i can see the points made, but you would still think instead of looking for past life on a dry and somewhat hostile planet like Mars, they'd throw everything including the kitchen sink at the icy moons. were surely the strongest possibility for life would exist. how many rovers have gone to Mars how many probes/satellites in orbit. surely if the will was there they CAN and could look for life on the icy moons.

Mars as become boring for the masses, findings might be rewarding for the experts but its the public who pay the taxes. capture the public's imagination and the money for vast space exploration in my lifetime would become available. the ultimate goal has to be - finding life and something more than a microbe. something more complex. something people can relate to.

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#9    Hawkin

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 04:05 PM

100 million planets :hmm:  Of course that's just a guestimation. Maybe Neil D. Tyson can zip around the galaxy in his ship and get a more accurate count. :yes:

It's good to have some skepticism so you won't be gullible & naïve. But to much skepticism can make you arrogant & egotistical.

#10    Merc14

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 04:58 PM

View Poststevewinn, on 09 June 2014 - 04:01 PM, said:

in reply to your good selves, i can see the points made, but you would still think instead of looking for past life on a dry and somewhat hostile planet like Mars, they'd throw everything including the kitchen sink at the icy moons. were surely the strongest possibility for life would exist. how many rovers have gone to Mars how many probes/satellites in orbit. surely if the will was there they CAN and could look for life on the icy moons.

Mars as become boring for the masses, findings might be rewarding for the experts but its the public who pay the taxes. capture the public's imagination and the money for vast space exploration in my lifetime would become available. the ultimate goal has to be - finding life and something more than a microbe. something more complex. something people can relate to.

Let's face facts, space in general is boring for most of the populace.  Unfortunate but true.  Right now we don't have the technology to get below the ice on Europa, hell, we can't get below the ice down in Antarctica to explore Lake Vostok so imagine doing it on Europa remotely.  i know many are studying the problem but Europa needs to be studied more before we try and get beneath the ice.  The Europa Clipper seems like a not too expensive mission that would provide us a lot more insight into what is going on at Europa and I'd love to see NASA fund that and get it on its way before the end of the decade.  http://www.jpl.nasa....ils.php?id=6002

Edited by Merc14, 09 June 2014 - 04:59 PM.

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#11    bison

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 05:10 PM

Both Europa and Enceladus  appear to have plumes of water vapor, jetting out from the oceans beneath their icy exteriors. It may not be necessary to penetrate the ice to study these oceans, and any life they may contain. A fly-by mission, like the Europa Clipper may be able to fly through and analyze the plumes.


#12    paperdyer

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 06:16 PM

Perhaps we keep looking to Mars for our "roots".  Maybe there is some hidden indication the there was human life on the Mars and we just aren't being told.

Hey - if we can have UFO conspiracy theories, why not this one! :sk


#13    JGirl

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 06:19 PM

I love how these huge numbers get tossed out as though someone actually counted.


#14    taniwha

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 06:38 PM

View PostJGirl, on 09 June 2014 - 06:19 PM, said:

I love how these huge numbers get tossed out as though someone actually counted.

Yes 400 billion divided by 100 million and you have the average amount of habitable planets revolving around each star.


#15    stevewinn

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 06:46 PM

View Postbison, on 09 June 2014 - 05:10 PM, said:

Both Europa and Enceladus  appear to have plumes of water vapor, jetting out from the oceans beneath their icy exteriors. It may not be necessary to penetrate the ice to study these oceans, and any life they may contain. A fly-by mission, like the Europa Clipper may be able to fly through and analyze the plumes.

exactly. it'll give us more than Mars.


View PostMerc14, on 09 June 2014 - 04:58 PM, said:

Let's face facts, space in general is boring for most of the populace.  Unfortunate but true.  Right now we don't have the technology to get below the ice on Europa, hell, we can't get below the ice down in Antarctica to explore Lake Vostok so imagine doing it on Europa remotely.  i know many are studying the problem but Europa needs to be studied more before we try and get beneath the ice.  The Europa Clipper seems like a not too expensive mission that would provide us a lot more insight into what is going on at Europa and I'd love to see NASA fund that and get it on its way before the end of the decade.  http://www.jpl.nasa....ils.php?id=6002

oh yes space is boring - yet when TV science shows are on Live TV prime-time such as star gazing Live on the BBC it attracts large viewing figures. so the possibility exists to capture the large percentage of public's imagination. and that's were it fails.

imagine going to Europa and finding life. complex life. NASA beaming back this type of image from Europa.
Posted Image

Or this image from Mars. people don't want to see a bloody rock.
Posted Image

okay i might be getting into the realms of fantasy but you get my point. i fear the budget of NASA will get smaller and smaller as the years roll on and missions to Europa will become even more less likely.

At least Europa Clipper is encouraging, and should be interesting. lets hope it finds something which encourages faster exploration Europa etc...

Edited by stevewinn, 09 June 2014 - 06:47 PM.

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