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Humans share dozens of universal emotions


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 10:15 AM

There are at least 30 facial expressions for emotions that can be recognized anywhere in the world.

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While we tend to take it for granted that we can determine if someone is happy, sad or excited no matter what part of the world they are from, not all emotions can be universally understood.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...versal-emotions

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#2    Paranomaly

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 10:44 AM

: D


#3    redhen

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 12:01 PM

I'd like to see the paper for this study. I suspect many of those 30 emotions are something else; feelings, moods, etc.

"While translating basic emotional concepts for Bhutanese villagers, the researchers also came upon a Bhutanese word that had no English equivalent: "chogshay," which loosely translates to a fundamental contentment that is independent of a person's current emotional state.

For instance, someone could be in the throws of rage or feel horrendously ill, but their underlying sense of well-being could still be intact.

"Fundamental contentment is a feeling of indestructible well-being  resulting from unconditional acceptance of the present moment," Cordaro said."


#4    Frank Merton

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 12:39 PM

In my more ambitious younger years I set out to catalog virtues and vices and emotions and sensations in the languages I knew.  There was a Chinese word that I could think of no Vietnamese or English equivalent to, and which I see English translations of Confucius put as "righteousness."  Surely it is not seen as an emotion but as a kind of catchall for being virtuous.

Not being native Chinese I have no gut feeling for the word, and when I have questioned Chinese I have gotten varying responses, but basically it means a generalized tendency or desire to do what is right.  Well I suppose "goodness" would work too, but obviously the English "righteousness" has more to it.  So often words are untranslatable and not even paragraphs of explanation succeed.  We just get slivers of hints of meaning.


#5    maximusnow

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 02:48 PM

The problem, I do not want to share emotions with any one. Emotions are like chemicals, if you mix them, they can explode.


#6    Hammerclaw

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 03:08 PM

There are always new words to discover in languages, other than one's own. English is known as the great borrower because it's speakers constantly incorporate words from other languages into it's vocabulary.

Edited by hammerclaw, 27 June 2014 - 03:08 PM.


#7    paperdyer

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 03:23 PM

Well, all salespeople use the universal "trust me!" smile.


#8    redhen

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:16 PM

View Postmaximusnow, on 27 June 2014 - 02:48 PM, said:

The problem, I do not want to share emotions with any one.

They're meant to be shared, that's we (and other animals) have then. Emotions are functional, used to express mental states to others.


#9    redhen

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:21 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 27 June 2014 - 12:39 PM, said:

There was a Chinese word that I could think of no Vietnamese or English equivalent to, and which I see English translations of Confucius put as "righteousness."  Surely it is not seen as an emotion but as a kind of catchall for being virtuous.

There is a Japanese word that is used to describe a emotion that is unique to their culture;

"There is amae everywhere in the world, but it is interesting that in the Japanese language there is a concrete word to describe it, there is even a verb amaeru that means “depend on the benevolence of others”."


#10    Hammerclaw

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 02:32 AM

Most human facial and body language is universal. I remenber how Hmong children had no difficulty playing charades. That sort of silent communication is ancient.


#11    redhen

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 02:37 AM

View PostJohn Wesley Boyd, on 28 June 2014 - 02:32 AM, said:

Most human facial and body language is universal.

It's also an old and established field of science now.

Edited by redhen, 28 June 2014 - 02:39 AM.


#12    maximusnow

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:53 PM

View Postredhen, on 27 June 2014 - 04:16 PM, said:

They're meant to be shared, that's we (and other animals) have then. Emotions are functional, used to express mental states to others.

This could be a violation of privacy. If say to you, I am ok and you see sadness on my face, now I am a liar and you are being nosey by investigating it further. I think women communicate emotionally and men communicate factually.  Examples:
A Wife asks: How do you like your steak?  Emotional translation = I always have to decide where we eat and if you complain about the cost, I will stab you with this fork!
A Husband asks :  How do you like your steak?  Emotional translation= How do you like your steak?  


#13    Frank Merton

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:01 PM

Most of us are pretty skillful at hiding our emotions, and sometimes this is best, particularly the emotion of shock at something a son or daughter tells us.





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