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Who Were the 'Sea People?'

ancient history; egypt hebrews

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#1    DeWitz

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 01:46 AM

Reviewing some leftover Old Testament studies notes, I was reminded of the 'Sea People' who invaded Egypt around 1177. However, my notes don't remind me of who they were and whence they came. Any UMers know about this culture that had a brief, but apparently deep, effect on Egypt and possibly the ancient Hebrews?

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#2    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 01:53 AM

Atlanteans :P
IIRC Someone suggested they were Hittites.

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#3    IBelieveWhatIWant

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:03 AM

Perhaps this would be of some use. http://ancienthistor...f/seapeople.htm


#4    aka CAT

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:08 AM

Another source:
Who Were the Sea People?
https://www.saudiara....sea.people.htm


#5    qxcontinuum

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 04:47 AM

Or Vikings?


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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:19 AM

I thought they were the Phoenicians?

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#7    bubblykiss

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:22 AM

More than likely they were rogue Έλληνες (Ellines)....Hellenes or;

Among the Sea Peoples identified in Egyptian records are the Ekwesh, possibly a group of Bronze Age Greeks (Achaeans); the Denyen, identified by some with the Greek Danaoi and by others with the Israelite tribe of Dan; the Teresh, i.e. the Tyrrhenians, possibly ancestors of the Etruscans; Lukka, an Anatolian people of the Aegean who may have given their name to the region of Lycia and the Lycian language; the Sherden, possibly Sardinians or people of Sardis; the Shekelesh, identified possibly with the Italic people called Siculi (from Sicily); the Peleset, whose name is generally believed to refer to the Philistines, who might have come from Crete with the Tekrur (possibly Greek Teucrians) and who together were the only major member of the Sea Peoples thought to have migrated permanently to the Levant.[2] Evidence for migrations of whole peoples are not found on any of the contemporary inscriptions, but versions of a "migration hypothesis" represent the widely held interpretation among scholars of the ancient Near East.[8]

The easy answer is that they were young me who wanted young men things (adventure, money, power, women and land) and they found it all over the Near East.

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#8    Van Gorp

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 07:14 AM

View PostSir Wearer of Hats, on 12 July 2014 - 01:53 AM, said:

Atlanteans :P
IIRC Someone suggested they were Hittites.

View PostIBelieveWhatIWant, on 12 July 2014 - 02:03 AM, said:

Perhaps this would be of some use. http://ancienthistor...f/seapeople.htm

View Postaka CAT, on 12 July 2014 - 02:08 AM, said:

Another source:
Who Were the Sea People?
https://www.saudiara....sea.people.htm

View Postqxcontinuum, on 12 July 2014 - 04:47 AM, said:

Or Vikings?

View Postand then, on 12 July 2014 - 05:19 AM, said:

I thought they were the Phoenicians?

View Postbubblykiss, on 12 July 2014 - 05:22 AM, said:

More than likely they were rogue Έλληνες (Ellines)....Hellenes or;

Among the Sea Peoples identified in Egyptian records are the Ekwesh, possibly a group of Bronze Age Greeks (Achaeans); the Denyen, identified by some with the Greek Danaoi and by others with the Israelite tribe of Dan; the Teresh, i.e. the Tyrrhenians, possibly ancestors of the Etruscans; Lukka, an Anatolian people of the Aegean who may have given their name to the region of Lycia and the Lycian language; the Sherden, possibly Sardinians or people of Sardis; the Shekelesh, identified possibly with the Italic people called Siculi (from Sicily); the Peleset, whose name is generally believed to refer to the Philistines, who might have come from Crete with the Tekrur (possibly Greek Teucrians) and who together were the only major member of the Sea Peoples thought to have migrated permanently to the Levant.[2] Evidence for migrations of whole peoples are not found on any of the contemporary inscriptions, but versions of a "migration hypothesis" represent the widely held interpretation among scholars of the ancient Near East.[8]

The easy answer is that they were young me who wanted young men things (adventure, money, power, women and land) and they found it all over the Near East.

And I was told it were the Vry-zyn from the North Sea :-)


#9    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:30 AM

For one, I don't think the Peleset were the Philistines, but the Pelasgians - however the Philistines may have been Pelasgians also.


Pelasgians to me, means people of the palaces - royalty. Then I check things about the people in question to see if it could be appropriate...

Upon becoming king, Pelasgus
Pelasgus built the citadel Larissa of Argos
According to Fragment 76 of Hellanicus's Phoronis, from Pelasgus and his wife Menippe came a line of kings: Phrastōr, Amyntōr, Teutamides and Nasas (kings of Pelasgiotis in Thessaly)
He states that the Pelasgians of Athens were called "Cranai" (Cranaus being the 2nd KING of Athens).
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Pelasgians

Mycenaeans had Linear B an IE language, so there is no reason imo to suspect they spoke a different language to the Pelasgians imo (also since Pelasgians are meant to be the inhabitants of Greece in the Bronze Age ie; Mycenaeans) and that their name is possibly an IE word. I never heard that Pelasgian (from Thessaly)  Achilles couldn't understand Agamemnon's speech. If anything, they spoke an Aeolic dialect that was just a different form from the later Greek, which had been influenced by different people.

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#10    Peter B

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:51 AM

View Postqxcontinuum, on 12 July 2014 - 04:47 AM, said:

Or Vikings?

Good grief...

With time machines?


#11    Peter B

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:58 AM

View Postand then, on 12 July 2014 - 05:19 AM, said:

I thought they were the Phoenicians?

Not likely, as I understand it.

As pointed out in the articles linked by IBelieveWhatIWant and aka CAT, the Sea Peoples seem to have mostly originated in Anatolia (what's now Asian Turkey). It's possible that they included people from both sides of the Trojan War, though as it's hard to date that war precisely it's impossible to be sure.

We do know that shortly before the Sea Peoples attacked Egypt the Hittite Kingdom (also in Anatolia) was overrun, along with the city of Ugarit in what's now northern Syria. It's fairly likely the Sea Peoples were responsible, and it's possible that the ranks of the Sea Peoples were swollen with unemployed Hittite soldiers afterwards.

By contrast, I understand the Phoenicians were bypassed by the Sea Peoples, who headed on south to attack Egypt.


#12    Peter B

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:00 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 12 July 2014 - 07:14 AM, said:

And I was told it were the Vry-zyn from the North Sea :-)

That would be Vry-zyn, pronounced freezin'? I probably would be too if I was from the North Sea...


#13    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:05 AM

Adding to that the meaning of Larissa, the town of Pelasgian Thessaly.

Could be based in the word for 'learn'. Learning centres were basically towns, where people could learn things they couldn't being isolated outside main towns and cities. The Library of Alexandria for example is a good example of a city based in the concept of learning. Also Achilles (and others) is known for being 'learned' by Chiron, of Mt Pelion.

learn (v.) Old English leornian "to get knowledge, be cultivated, study, read, think about," from Proto-Germanic *liznojan (cognates: Old Frisian lernia, Middle Dutch leeren, Dutch leren, Old High German lernen, German lernen "to learn," Gothic lais "I know"), with a base sense of "to follow or find the track," from PIE *leis- (1) "track, furrow." Related to German Gleis "track," and to Old English læst "sole of the foot" (see last (n.))
http://www.etymonlin....php?term=learn

I also think many mythical characters hide their etymologies within their names based on things they are known for.

Peleus lived in Larissa. The name Peleus is another word for "sole of the foot" - based in another IE etymology PEL = skin (ie; phallis)
Note also in LEARN the root is "to follow or find the track" and in English "sole of the foot".

There is also another Pelias who wanted to take over Thessaly.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason
Pelias (Aeson's half-brother) was very power-hungry, and he wished to gain dominion over all of Thessaly. (He's AESon's half brother - læst "sole of the foot" )

I don't have to tell you the story of Jason and the sandal do I...?

When Jason entered Iolcus (modern-day city of Volos), he was announced as a man wearing one sandal. Where do you wear a sandal? On the sole of your foot, where else..?

I'd even go so far to say that the same etymology is responsible for Greek aster - STAR (LAEST) "to follow a path"


Van Gorp, you might find this interesting: Gleis "track,"  - beach-combing requires walking back and forth along the beach - glisas (glass/amber)

Edited by The Puzzler, 12 July 2014 - 10:17 AM.

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#14    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:19 AM

View PostPeter B, on 12 July 2014 - 09:51 AM, said:

Good grief...

With time machines?
Possibly they meant the men looked like Bronze Age Scandinavians, who wore horned helmets like Vikings, the same Bronze Age Scandinavians who were the Viking ancestors.

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#15    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:34 AM

View PostPeter B, on 12 July 2014 - 09:51 AM, said:

Good grief...

With time machines?
VLKA FENRYKA!!

I must not fear. Fear is the Mind-Killer. It is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and to move through me. And when it is gone I will turn the inner eye to see it's path.
When the fear is gone, there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

You may think you're cool, but you'll never be as cool as Peter Capaldi with an electric guitar, on a tank, playing the Doctor Who theme.




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