Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

North Korea calls for US apology


  • Please log in to reply
60 replies to this topic

#31    Babs

Babs

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,663 posts
  • Joined:27 Nov 2003

  • "Truth will first be ridiculed, then violently opposed, and finally accepted as self-evident" A. Schopenhauer 1788-1860

Posted 03 March 2005 - 02:10 AM

QUOTE(Talon S. @ Mar 2 2005, 08:02 PM)
QUOTE
QUOTE
Are you a Commy Sympathizer?

... good one.


Babs, considering that your old enough to remember the start of the First Cold war, I'm surprised that your so eager to live through a second.

View Post


surprize surprize...SURPRIZES ALL AROUND. tongue.gif

"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation"

Henry David Thoreau...

#32    Talon

Talon

    UM Chess Tournament Champion 2005

  • Member
  • 15,003 posts
  • Joined:29 Jan 2004
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paisley, Scotland

  • Life, Death, Anime inbetween

Posted 03 March 2005 - 02:13 AM

huh.gif Indeed, you just can't guess what some people are thinking

"Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something." -Plato

#33    Babs

Babs

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,663 posts
  • Joined:27 Nov 2003

  • "Truth will first be ridiculed, then violently opposed, and finally accepted as self-evident" A. Schopenhauer 1788-1860

Posted 03 March 2005 - 02:20 AM

Well now... I'll have to get my crystal ball out. geek.gif

Edited by Babs, 03 March 2005 - 04:23 AM.

"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation"

Henry David Thoreau...

#34    bathory

bathory

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 5,302 posts
  • Joined:20 Nov 2003
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia

Posted 03 March 2005 - 03:23 AM

QUOTE
I think Korea has a point, if your attempting to talk a nation into dismantling its nuclear arsenal, calling them 'evil', 'outpost of tyranny', and generally threatening them isn't the best start in such discussions.


i'd accept that, if they hadn't been jerking the US around for the past decade

Problems with negotiations have been going on long before the axis of evil comment


#35    Mad Manfred

Mad Manfred

    Cutesy Wootsy

  • Member
  • 4,505 posts
  • Joined:03 Jun 2004
  • Location:Tinkly-Winkly Town

Posted 03 March 2005 - 03:39 AM

On the behalf of the Brodie Clan, I'd like to give this public statement to the North Korean government:

user posted image


#36    joc

joc

    Adminstrator of Cosmic Blues

  • Member
  • 14,465 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2003
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milky Way Galaxy 3rd planet

  • They're wearing steel that's bright and true
    They carry news that must get through
    They choose the path where no-one goes

Posted 03 March 2005 - 03:48 AM

At least someone has a sense of humor around here. rolleyes.gif  thumbsup.gif

Posted Image
once i believed that starlight could guide me home
now i know that light is old and stars are cold

ReverbNation

#37    Babs

Babs

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,663 posts
  • Joined:27 Nov 2003

  • "Truth will first be ridiculed, then violently opposed, and finally accepted as self-evident" A. Schopenhauer 1788-1860

Posted 03 March 2005 - 04:24 AM

QUOTE(Mad Manfred @ Mar 2 2005, 09:39 PM)
On the behalf of the Brodie Clan, I'd like to give this public statement to the North Korean government:

user posted image

View Post



grin2.gif  rofl.gif  thumbsup.gif  thumbsup.gif

Edited by Babs, 03 March 2005 - 04:25 AM.

"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation"

Henry David Thoreau...

#38    Bex

Bex

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 696 posts
  • Joined:10 Nov 2004
  • Location:Central Texas, USA

  • Texas Wildflower

Posted 03 March 2005 - 04:57 AM

At 11:02 a.m. on Ausust 9, 1945, the explosion of an atomic bomb devastated Nagasaki.

The ferocious heat and blast indiscriminately slaughtered its inhabitants. Even the people who managed to survive continue to this day to suffer from late effects.

Five decades have passed since that day. Now the atomic bomb survivors are advancing into old age and their memories are fading into the mist of history. The question of how to inform young people about the horror of war, the threat of nuclear weapons and the importance of the peace is therefore a matter of passing concern.

The citizens of Nagasaki pray that this miserable experience will never be repeated on Earth. We also consider it our duty to ensure that the experience is not forgotten but passed on intact to future generations.

It is imperative that we join hands with all peace-loving people around the world and strive together for the realization of lasting world peace.

This is why, Atomic Bombs aren't the least bit funny.



#39    Bex

Bex

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 696 posts
  • Joined:10 Nov 2004
  • Location:Central Texas, USA

  • Texas Wildflower

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:07 AM


Known as Urakami, the district around the hypocenter (ground zero) area had been populated for centuries by Japanese people of the Roman Catholic faith. At the time of the bombing, between 15,000 and 16,000 Catholics - the majority of the approximately 20,000 people of that faith in Nagasaki and about half of the local population - lived in the Urakami district. It is said that about 10,000 Catholics were killed by the atomic bomb. Although traditionally a rustic isolated suburb, the Urakami district was chosen as the site for munitions factories in the 1920s, after which time the population soared and an industrial zone quickly took shape. The district was also home to the Nagasaki Medical College and a large number of other schools and public buildings. The industrial and school zones of the Urakami district lay to the east of the Urakami River, while the congested residential district of Shiroyama stretched to the hillsides on the west side of the river. It was over this section of Nagasaki that the second atomic bomb exploded at 11:02 a.m., August 9, 1945. The damages inflicted on Nagasaki by the atomic bombing defy description. The 20 machi or neighborhoods within a one kilometer radius of the atomic bombing were completely destroyed by the heat flash and blast wind generated by the explosion and then reduced to ashes by the subsequent fires. About 80% of houses in the more than 20 neighborhoods between one and two kilometers from the hypocenter collapsed and burned, and when the smoke cleared the entire area was strewn with corpses. This area within two kilometers of the hypocenter is referred to as the "hypocenter zone." The destruction caused by the atomic bomb is analyzed as follows in Nagasaki Shisei Rokujugonenshi Kohen [History of Nagasaki City on the 65th Anniversary of Municipal Incorporation, Volume 2] published in 1959. The area within one kilometer of the hypocenter: Almost all humans and animals died instantly as a result of the explosive force and heat generated by the explosion. Wooden structures, houses and other buildings were pulverized. In the hypocenter area the debris was immediately reduced to ashes, while in other areas raging fires broke out almost simultaneously. Gravestones toppled and broke. Plants and trees of all sizes were snapped off at the stems and left to burn facing away from the hypocenter. The area within two kilometers: Some humans and animals died instantly and a majority suffered injuries of varying severity as a result of the explosive force and heat generated by the explosion. About 80% of wooden structures, houses and other buildings were destroyed, and the fires spreading from other areas burned most of the debris. Concrete and iron poles remained intact. Plants were partially burned and killed. The area between three and four kilometers: Some humans and animals suffered injuries of varying severity as a result of debris scattered by the blast, and others suffered burns as a result of radiant heat. Things black in color tended to catch fire. Most houses and other buildings were partially destroyed, and some buildings and wooden poles burned. The remaining wooden telephone poles were scorched on the side facing the hypocenter. The area between four and eight kilometers: Some humans and animals suffered injuries of varying severity as a result of debris scattered by the blast, and houses were partially destroyed or damaged. The area within 15 kilometers: The impact of the blast was felt clearly, and windows, doors and paper screens were broken. Wall clock found in Sakamoto-machi about 1 km from the hypocenter. The hands stopped at the moment of the explosion: 11:02 a.m. The injuries inflicted by the atomic bomb resulted from the combined effect of blast wind, heat rays (radiant heat) and radiation and surfaced in an extremely complex pattern of symptoms. The death toll within a distance of one kilometer from the hypocenter was 96.7% among people who suffered burns, 96.9% among people who suffered other external injuries, and 94.1% among people who suffered no apparent injuries. These data show that the deaths occurring immediately after the atomic bombing were due not only to burns and external injuries but also to severe radiation-induced injuries. The late medical effects of atomic bomb exposure include "keloid" scars, atomic bomb cataracts, leukemia and other cancers and microcephaly (small head syndrome) due to intrauterine exposure. Although aware that the atomic bomb had the power to instantly kill or injure all people within a radius of four kilometers, the authorities were unable to determine the death toll and number of injuries in Nagasaki. Still today there is no accurate data on the number of people who died. A variety of factors contributed to this lack of information, such as the paralysis of administrative functions in the aftermath of the bombing and the inability of the postwar government to initiate a proper investigation. Another obstacle was the enduring nature of disorders related to atomic bomb exposure. A progressive increase can be expected, therefore, at whatever point in time calculations are made. There are countless cases of people who suffered injuries on August 9 and died after fleeing to areas outside Nagasaki city and prefecture, only to be registered as dying of causes other than the atomic bombing. Because of the lack of knowledge about radioactive contamination, meanwhile, many radiation deaths were attributed to diseases. The Nagasaki municipal government officially adopted the figure of "more than 70,000" deaths on the basis of information from population surveys and the estimate made by the Nagasaki City Atomic Bomb Records Preservation Committee in July 1950. Said the committee in its report: "73,884 people were killed and 74,909 injured, and 17,358 of the deaths were confirmed by post- mortem examination soon after the atomic bombing."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Attached Thumbnails

  • 08.gif


#40    joc

joc

    Adminstrator of Cosmic Blues

  • Member
  • 14,465 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2003
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milky Way Galaxy 3rd planet

  • They're wearing steel that's bright and true
    They carry news that must get through
    They choose the path where no-one goes

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:20 AM

QUOTE
This is why, Atomic Bombs aren't the least bit funny.


I'm sorry if my humor offended you Pisces.   You are quite correct that Nuclear Nightmare is not funny. no.gif   It is unthinkable and I pray we never see a Nuclear Explosion in our lifetime or the lifetime of our children or their children or forever.

My whole point was to make fun of NK for demanding we apologize.  It is a major concern that rogue states such as NK and Iran seek such weaponry.  They know good and well that we would never attack them with Nuclear weapons.  Yet they seek them  just the same.  If we do see a Nuclear Explosion in our lifetime, it will be an unprecedented attack by terrorists or madmen such as Kim Jong Mentally Ill.  

The weapons of today are not the same as Nagasaki and Hiroshima.  A terrorist might build one of those types of weapons, but ours are unbelievably deadly.   A fair comparison might be:  The Hiroshima bomb is to a firecracker what the Nuclear Bombs of today are to the Hiroshima bomb.  



Posted Image
once i believed that starlight could guide me home
now i know that light is old and stars are cold

ReverbNation

#41    Bex

Bex

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 696 posts
  • Joined:10 Nov 2004
  • Location:Central Texas, USA

  • Texas Wildflower

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:52 AM

I understand your humour, really, but I also wanted to also express that not all people joke around with certain disturbing images.
Where I live, North Korea is always talked about in the same manner.
I believe the average person has the same ability and motivation to help make the world a better place; not just the wealthy powerful families.

I went to bed but I could sleep without finding articles about the Atomic Bomb. It's something I had to do. Normally I wouldn't continue to respond but I remember images when I was younger during the Vietnam War.

Basically, I just wanted to teach the members who are unaware of the past.

It's okay Joc

Attached Thumbnails

  • 30.jpg
  • 62.jpg
  • 07.jpg
  • 58.jpg

Edited by pisces1963, 03 March 2005 - 05:53 AM.


#42    warden

warden

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,751 posts
  • Joined:10 Dec 2004
  • Location:scotland midlothian

Posted 03 March 2005 - 08:26 AM

It just shows you how far people will go in a thread that was meant to  be about an apology


#43    Zeus

Zeus

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,081 posts
  • Joined:14 Sep 2004
  • Location:London

  • The mind is Now.

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:23 PM

QUOTE(recon_soldier @ Mar 3 2005, 01:52 AM)
Heheh, Its called a police state, where everything you do is monitored and alot of other ugly suprises.

www.infowars.com
www.infowars.tv
www.prisonplanet.com
www.prisonplanet.tv


All alex jones's websites

Patriot Act took away a large amount of your US Residential freedoms

You know, to protect you from the big bad CIA ...ah, i mean Al-q....

View Post


Exactly. From all these valiant responses there is one small problem. You are being duped by the media and until you sit with kim or bush you will continue to believe the media and we all know the media tell nothing but the truth right? So why debate on a false reality. boy oh boy when you recieve the alarm call you may realise that those idiot conspiracy fools were more than spot on then you may look back on the time that you did have to act and realise that you did nothing but chat on the realities of a false conflict. Many people have woken up. Or have they?


#44    gollum

gollum

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,131 posts
  • Joined:19 Oct 2003

  • CHE GUEVARA
    "La Revolucion De La Gente Cubana"

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:37 PM

The following is an extract from a book who's authors name eludes me at the moment....but I will edit when I get it.

............................................................



When the Soviet Red Army occupied North Korea and established a Communist rule over North Korea, many residents of North Korea took up arms to fight the Red regime.  The Hamhung Students Uprising and the Sinyiju Students Uprising in 1946 (Lee Wha Rang, 2003, "Hamhung...") led to armed resistance in North Korea.  By the time, the UN forces moved up North, there were some ten thousands anti-Communist partisans.  When the UN forces retreated, many of the partisans remained to fight on and some fought their way to the areas controlled by the UN forces.

Map 1: General retreat routes of the anti-Communist North Korean partisans numbering 6,000 - 10,000, mostly young students. (Cleaver, Frederick W., et al.)

Many of the partisans in the north-east fought their way south along the East coast.  Most of them perished - some by friendly fires.  And most of those made it safety formed the core members of a new partisan unit organized by the US CIA.  This unit had no official designation until a year later when it was officially designated the Y-Unit.

Of the anti-Communist organizations in North Korea prior to the Korean War, the North Korea League was the most active and best organized. The league was formed by three or so anti-Communists on their own volition. In September 1949, about 30 members gathered at Mt. Ohbong.  Their most urgent mission was to acquire weapons. The League was led by Kang Suk-dae and they relied on psy-war on Communist security officers and returning 8th Army (Mao's Army) to get them join the League with their weapons.  Later, the League was able to attack enemy troops for war materials. By April, 1950, the League had about thirty armed men and began a guerrilla war in earnest.

After the war started, the League partisans began to attack enemy troops as well as the enemy police.  The League partisans attacked the Park Sang-gol regiment and captured the regimental commander and seven of his subordinates.  In September of the year, the partisans ambushed and killed sixteen North Korean People's Army senior officers en route to a meeting in Ranam.  In addition, the partisans raided six police stations and fought three pitched battles with the enemy troops in a six month period.

Map 2: The retreat route of the North Korean League partisans. Some of them reached Seoul and then returned to Hamhung.  Some enlisted in the ROKA and then were transferred to the Y-Unit.

The success of the League partisans was in part due to the rugged terrains of North Korea but mainly due to the fact that the League had more than one thousand members.  The League had spy networks of young girls and old people.  These informants were instrumental in the ambush of the high-ranking officers mentioned above.  The partisans engaged in mortal combats with the enemy troops and they also conducted psy-war on the enemy to defect and to lower their morale.

The League played a crucial role in helping many refugees to escape to South Korea. On November 4, 1950, the unit helped many anti-Communist youth to escape by boat. On the day of the departure, a large crowd of people gathered at the unit's quarter pleading for help.  These people were denied boat ride because there were not enough boats to ferry them.  The League convinced them that the land route was still open and encouraged them to travel on land.

The League unit departed in the evening of the 5th of November and reached Ahn-byong-gun Gae-wha-myon at about 9 PM. Several members were sent to Ahnbyong to link up with anti-Communist forces there.  The League unit was under constant naval bombardments by UN warships during the night.  Early next day, they left for Tong-chun.  When they reached Ton-chun in the evening, UN jets fighters attacked them mistaking for the enemy.  There was no casualty but they lost three trucks loaded with explosives and communication gears.  The loss of these trucks forced the unit to alter its original plan.  

The unit decided to help as many anti-Communists to escape south as possible. The partisans left Tong-chun that night and arrived at Jang-chun next morning.  They learned that the ROKA had many ships loaded with fish ready to sail south, and forced the ROKA to dump the fish and load refugees instead.  A detachment was sent to nearby town and helped a large group of refugees to escape to South Korea.  The detachment was again attacked by friendly aircraft and lost a truck.  They left Gohsung that evening in the one truck remaining and reached Dong-chang in the afternoon of the 8th.

Photo:  "Mr. Arnolds" of the US CIA who was the first American to get in touch with the League partisans.  The Seoul detachment of the League met him in Seoul in 1950.

Enemy agents spread false rumors about the ROKA advancing north and the Chinese troops retreating for the purpose of stopping the refugees from moving south.  Many of the refugees were taken in by the false rumors and turned back toward their home.  The League partisans persuaded the refugees that the rumors were false and to continue to walk southwards.  On the following day, the Unit commander and several members left for Seoul.  Eleven members under Young-dang were left behind to care for the refugees.  

The Seoul-bound detachment reached Kangnung and crossed the Dae-kwang pass and stayed overnight at Dae-wha.  They arrived in Seoul on the 13th. Upon arrival, they met with "Mr. Arnolds" of the US CIA, after which they planned to return to Kangnung. But heavy snowfalls prevented them from leaving Seoul. They wanted to participate in an operation to extract comrades stranded at Dong-cho.  Those comrades were killed by the enemy.  

Photo: The Unit #15 members at Hamhung Young-po airfield, November 1950.

Unaware of this tragedy, an ROKA rescue team of about 30 men arrived at Dang-chun in the morning of the 7th. But it was too late. The White Tiger Unit was gone.  The survivors tried to regroup but they were arrested and executed on December 24, 1950.  Thus ended the North Korean League's first phase partisan warfare in North Korea.

The US CIA ran three independent units - the Young-do Partisan Unit, The Hoyum Unit, and the HQ unit.  The Young-do unit operated in the three provinces of North and South Hamgyong, and Kangwon: the Hoyum Unit operated in the Yellow Sea.  These two units were managed by Koreans with American advisory, while the HQ unit was under the direct control of the CIA and little is known of its operations even today. (Kang, In-mo)

The Young-do Unit was a super secret guerrilla unit created in November 1950 by the US CIA at Young-do, a hot-springs resort area of Pusan, known today as the Taejong-dae Public Parks.  From its beginning until its disbanding on December 5, 1952, over 1,200 anti-Communist youth from the northern provinces of North Korea  - the North and South Hamgyong Provinces and the Kangwon Province.  Of these about 900 were sent to North Korea to fight a desperate guerrilla war. They were abandoned when the CIA disbanded the unit and only about 40 of the 900 have managed to return home - the rest are presumed dead fighting or in captivity.

Photo 1: The Y-Unit shoulder patch.  JACK - Joint Advisory Commission - Korea - was the code name for the US CIA station in Korea.

The anti-Communist North Koreans were parachuted or boated behind the enemy line on super secret and suicidal missions of destroying enemy military installations, organizing anti-Communist resistance groups, rescuing key anti-Communist leaders from enemy prison, and radioing critical military intelligence ti the US CIA.  The partisans managed to create major disturbances in the enemy interior and forced the enemy to divert several divisions from the front to the rear area.  

The US CIA disbanded the Unit in December 1952 and made no effort to extract the stranded guerrillas.

Over fifty years have gone by since the Young-do Unit was disbanded and the true history of the unit can be told only now.  Why 50 years of silence?  There are three major reasons: (1) The Unit was super secret and the members were sworn to keep silent: (2) The guerrillas sent north swore to stay and fight until North Korea was liberated, and disclosing their existence might have jeopardized them: and (3) conditions were not conducive to the public disclosure of the unit until now.  
........................................................................................................

Now, are they really disbanded or do they still exist? ph34r.gif

Two hundred pounds? I'm not trying to buy cocaine!

Dougal: Oho, Ted, the Italians know about football, all right. And fashion. God Ted, do you remember that man who was so good at fashion, they had to shoot him?


Come here and play online chess @ Gameknot!

#45    I am me

I am me

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,115 posts
  • Joined:28 Dec 2004

Posted 03 March 2005 - 05:57 PM

How do any of you know that the North Korean leader is a mad man?  Who here really knows?  All we know from the news is that he asked president Bush to apologize and to withdraw his current foreign policy of nation building.  I agree 100% with Kim Ill Jong.  He has nuclear weapons and he can now stand up and say these things.  I would not disarm and in fact if I was a small nation that the USA was treatening, I would seek out nuclear weapons because that is one of the only ways to keep us out.

I have seen North Korea and I have lived in South Korea.  South Korea is not the best place in the world in parts.  Some of it is still quite old fashioned.  I can only assume the same for the North except it has quite a bit less money and provisions.  There may be people starving over in North Korea but it is not our government's job to see to it that something is done.  It is not worth all of the lives that will be killed for that to happen either.  I know my life is not worth it to me, and I am sure most of you will say the same about your life, yet look at how many of you think this is so funny.  Look how many of you think we should just parade around and "fix" all of these nations, of course without your life at risk.  Put your life on the line and see how quick you change your mind.  Now think about how all the people in these nations feel.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users