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Does Megalodon Still exist?


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228 replies to this topic

Poll: Is Meg still swimming the sea's? (214 member(s) have cast votes)

Is Meg still swimming the sea's?

  1. yes (105 votes [49.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 49.07%

  2. no (109 votes [50.93%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.93%

Vote

#1    Invisigoth

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 02:14 PM

There are lots of reports of Megalodon being alive.   What do you think could it still be out there?

I've been reading about sharks and collecting fossil teeth since I was a kid and i'd love to discuss the subject.


#2    N-droe

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 02:41 PM

Well, I think it sure is possible that it still exists.

But I got a question. A couple of months ago I read an article about Japanese research. They dropped a container into a ocean trench. This container was filled with food and rigged with a motion activated camera.
In one of the shots made by the camera, they saw a huge shadow of some kind of fish (or whale). As far a I recall the sharks eating the bait in the container al swiftly left the container as soon as the shadow came into the picture.
This shadow was estimated to belong to a 60m long animal.

Can anyone point me to this article again? And to other articles about follow-ups on this research? I like to know what's going on.

These kind of things surely make one believe megalodon is still out there. It's a big ocean and we're very small.

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#3    Invisigoth

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 02:47 PM

I think it was a Pacfic Sleeper shark that bumped into the camera


#4    Clobhair-cean

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 04:13 PM

It simply can't exist, or one would have been caught or spotted. A creature of such size could only be hiding from science in the depths of the sea, but there is a problem with this: The Megalodon belongs to the genus Charcharodon, so its closest relative is the Great White, but the Mako and the Porbeagle are also close to it, and none of these are deep-sea species. It is highly improbable, that such a difference could occur in a family of animals(deep-sea living obviously requires different morphology, and that would place the Megalodon in a different family.) Furthermore a large, deep-sea carnivore could not find sufficient amounts of food, because as one goes lower, the animals tend to get smaller in order to be able to bear the pressure and a 16 meter shark could not wait for the occasional appearances of Sperm Whales and such animals, because they do not spend that much time in the great depths.


#5    Invisigoth

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 04:23 PM

I tend to agree with what you said though I support the idea that Megalodon should be listed in the genus Carcharocles instead of Charchaodon.  I think the line of sharks that evolved into Meg broke off much Earlier .   I also think that the White shark evolved from a line of prehistoric Mako sharks and not Megalodon.

Edited by Invisigoth, 29 May 2005 - 04:24 PM.


#6    Great Big Sea

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 04:53 PM

Interesting topic. But I sure wouldn't want to swim and see one at the same time!  tongue.gif I chose the
no on the poll.

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#7    Conspiracy

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 05:01 PM

i vote yes. ocean is to big to declare it 'extinct' just cuz no one seen it around for so long

Posted Image

#8    marduk

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 05:05 PM

QUOTE(Invisigoth @ May 29 2005, 05:23 PM)
I tend to agree with what you said though I support the idea that Megalodon should be listed in the genus Carcharocles instead of Charchaodon.  I think the line of sharks that evolved into Meg broke off much Earlier .   I also think that the White shark evolved from a line of prehistoric Mako sharks and not Megalodon.

 


as i understand it the genus Carcharocles is the ancestor of the mako.
the evidence is suggesting that the megalodon is the ancestor of the modern day mako,
the great whites ancestor is at the moment undiscovered and was most likely a regular sized shark.
yes.gif


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#9    Clobhair-cean

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 06:31 PM

QUOTE(Invisigoth @ May 29 2005, 05:23 PM)
I tend to agree with what you said though I support the idea that Megalodon should be listed in the genus Carcharocles instead of Charchaodon.  I think the line of sharks that evolved into Meg broke off much Earlier .   I also think that the White shark evolved from a line of prehistoric Mako sharks and not Megalodon.

 



Well, a perfect taxonomical categorisation is quite an impossible task, because the only things that has ever been found in context with the Megalodon are its teeth...


#10    marduk

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 11:18 PM

QUOTE(Clobhair-cean @ May 29 2005, 07:31 PM)
QUOTE(Invisigoth @ May 29 2005, 05:23 PM)
I tend to agree with what you said though I support the idea that Megalodon should be listed in the genus Carcharocles instead of Charchaodon.  I think the line of sharks that evolved into Meg broke off much Earlier .   I also think that the White shark evolved from a line of prehistoric Mako sharks and not Megalodon.

 



Well, a perfect taxonomical categorisation is quite an impossible task, because the only things that has ever been found in context with the Megalodon are its teeth...

 


How lucky for us that we commonly identify shark species by the shape of their teeth then
lol  w00t.gif

Edited by marduk, 30 May 2005 - 01:22 AM.

Posted Image
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#11    ALNA70

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 05:19 AM

I voted yes. I think that the ocean is too big for us to assume that we've found all living species of sharks.

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#12    Vallheru

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 07:05 AM

oh not again.....looks like there's a topic on Meg every 2 weeks now.....should we make it a permanent topic on the site?


#13    Invisigoth

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 07:07 AM

QUOTE(Vallheru @ May 30 2005, 03:05 AM)
oh not again.....looks like there's a topic on Meg every 2 weeks now.....should we make it a permanent topic on the site?

 




Sorry, i'll be sure to check with you first before posting a new topic.


#14    Cat Baaloo

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 07:15 AM

I agree, the ocean is vast and we know very little about what's all out there.  My 8 year old son really love the idea of huge sharks.  Megalodon is a big hit in our house.  Other than that, I'm lost on the whole shark evolutionary tree, but I am interested to read what you all have posted.


#15    Clobhair-cean

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 07:19 AM

QUOTE(marduk @ May 30 2005, 12:18 AM)
QUOTE(Clobhair-cean @ May 29 2005, 07:31 PM)
QUOTE(Invisigoth @ May 29 2005, 05:23 PM)
I tend to agree with what you said though I support the idea that Megalodon should be listed in the genus Carcharocles instead of Charchaodon.  I think the line of sharks that evolved into Meg broke off much Earlier .   I also think that the White shark evolved from a line of prehistoric Mako sharks and not Megalodon.

 



Well, a perfect taxonomical categorisation is quite an impossible task, because the only things that has ever been found in context with the Megalodon are its teeth...

 


How lucky for us that we commonly identify shark species by the shape of their teeth then
lol  w00t.gif

 



True, but without having a complete jaw, or some sense of the body shape, the Charcharodon/Charcharocles debate can't be settled. Different lamnoid teeth can be really similar...





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