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The 3 degree background radiation


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#1    j6p

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Posted 24 June 2003 - 01:44 AM

                                                      We see out about 15 billion light years. By that it is determined that our universe is 15 billion years old. Based on this it was said that the background residual radiation from the big bang should be about 3 degrees. When it was found that there is in fact a hissing background radiation of 3 degrees the scientific community all (well most) said, "there it is, there is the proof of the big bang". Bondi, Gold and Hoyle were defeated....so it seemed. I would like to see the "steady state" re-examined but this time as the "steady state expanding universe" of many bangs or manifestations of matter.  
One small monkey wrench that I would like to throw into the works is this: If there is more mass out past 15 billion light years,  the 3 degree background radiation can't be residual from the big bang because that temperature is calculated as being residual from an expansion that started 15 billion years ago. I am suggesting that the 3K temp could be generated from the expansion of a cosmos that is being stretched.                                                      


#2    Homer

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Posted 24 June 2003 - 05:08 AM

                                                      Interesting thoery j6p.
This relates to our earlier discussion a few months ago. It has been measured that the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is 2.7k(2.735k to be more precise) uniformly throughout the universe, and if this theory you mentioned is accurate, then that would mean the expansion is also uniform in all directions.

If this theory were true, I would question the lack of temperature fluctuations. At some level one expects to see irregularities in the temperature of the radiation. These temperature fluctuations are the imprints of very small irregularities which through time have grown to become the galaxies and clusters of galaxies which we see today.

CMB's don't have these fluctuations, which makes this theory more difficult to believe, in my opinion



                                                      

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#3    j6p

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Posted 24 June 2003 - 01:26 PM

                                                      Thanks Homer I always like talking with you about the cosmos. It would be nice if we lived near each other. I could see me and you out in our lawn chairs on a starry summer night looking up at the sky sipping our favorite adult beverage talking science. I don't know about your special Lady but my Honey's eyes glaze over when I talk science to her. She likes horses and gardening.                                                      





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