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Antarctica 'Lost World' Found


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#1    the14u2cee

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 07:40 PM

The researchers found what they believe to be the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. One is a 70-million-year old quick-moving meat-eater found on the bottom of an Antarctic sea, while and the other is a 200-million-year-old giant plant-eater that was found on the top of a mountain, reports Reuters.
The lost world in which these two dinosaurs lived was very different from the Antarctica we know now. Their Antarctica was not frigid and frozen. Their Antarctica was warm and wet.

The 70-million-year-old carnivore was small for a dinosaur at just 6 to 8 feet tall. Scientists believe it is an entirely new species of carnivorous dinosaur that is related to the enormous meat-eating tyrannosaurs and the equally voracious, but smaller and swifter, velociraptors. Think "Jurassic Park." Now scream in terror! Found on James Ross Island off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula by a team led by Judd Case from St. Mary's College of California, it likely floated out to sea after it died and then sank to the bottom of the Weddell Sea. Reuters explains that its bones and teeth show that it was a two-legged animal that survived in the Antarctic long after other predators took over elsewhere on the globe. "One of the surprising things is that animals with these more primitive characteristics generally haven't survived as long elsewhere as they have in Antarctica," Case told Reuters.

The 200-million-year-old herbivore, a primitive sauropod that had a long neck and four legs, was found by a team led by William Hummer from Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois on the 13,000-foot high Mt. Kirkpatrick near the Beardmore Glacier. When this dino lived, the area was a soft riverbed. The team found dinosaur bones, specifically part of a huge pelvis and ilium. "This site is so far removed geographically from any site near its age, it's clearly a new dinosaur to Antarctica," Hammer told Reuters. This dinosaur was probably about 30 feet long, but was part of a lineage that went on to produce animals as large as 100 feet long.

Both excavations were supported by the National Science Foundation, an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering.  

FROM THE NEWS


#2    frogfish

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 09:36 PM

Many dinosaurs have been discovered in Antarctica...Crylophosaurus is the most famous...a Hypsilophodontid, an artic nodosaur, and several sauropods, theropods, and hadrosaurs....During the Mesozoic, Antarctica was just below the Equator...It was a rainforest.


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#3    Master of Geeks

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 03:33 AM

Quote


The researchers found what they believe to be the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. One is a 70-million-year old quick-moving meat-eater found on the bottom of an Antarctic sea, while and the other is a 200-million-year-old giant plant-eater that was found on the top of a mountain, reports Reuters.
The lost world in which these two dinosaurs lived was very different from the Antarctica we know now. Their Antarctica was not frigid and frozen. Their Antarctica was warm and wet.

The 70-million-year-old carnivore was small for a dinosaur at just 6 to 8 feet tall. Scientists believe it is an entirely new species of carnivorous dinosaur that is related to the enormous meat-eating tyrannosaurs and the equally voracious, but smaller and swifter, velociraptors. Think "Jurassic Park." Now scream in terror! Found on James Ross Island off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula by a team led by Judd Case from St. Mary's College of California, it likely floated out to sea after it died and then sank to the bottom of the Weddell Sea. Reuters explains that its bones and teeth show that it was a two-legged animal that survived in the Antarctic long after other predators took over elsewhere on the globe. "One of the surprising things is that animals with these more primitive characteristics generally haven't survived as long elsewhere as they have in Antarctica," Case told Reuters.

The 200-million-year-old herbivore, a primitive sauropod that had a long neck and four legs, was found by a team led by William Hummer from Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois on the 13,000-foot high Mt. Kirkpatrick near the Beardmore Glacier. When this dino lived, the area was a soft riverbed. The team found dinosaur bones, specifically part of a huge pelvis and ilium. "This site is so far removed geographically from any site near its age, it's clearly a new dinosaur to Antarctica," Hammer told Reuters. This dinosaur was probably about 30 feet long, but was part of a lineage that went on to produce animals as large as 100 feet long.

Both excavations were supported by the National Science Foundation, an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering.  

FROM THE NEWS


This ain't new to me ive heard about this since i was 3 sleepy.gif

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#4    saladins follower

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 05:32 AM

so they saying it had a big penis  laugh.gif  laugh.gif  laugh.gif das classic


#5    frogfish

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 09:26 PM

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so they saying it had a big penis    das classic

Where?

A big pelvis only means it was big...it needed the extra support to hold its weight...

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#6    Guardsman Bass

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 10:45 PM

This is one of those bits of information which make me feel kind of sorry that we got screwed out of a warm world. Although it wasn't as far south back then as it is now, much of Antarctica was still farther south than the Antarctic circle. Yet it was a mix between warm temperature and cool temperate climates.

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#7    FrothyDog

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 06:45 PM

technically, right now we are in an ice age.  for most of earth's history there were no massive, constantly frozen areas.


#8    Guardsman Bass

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 11:49 PM

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technically, right now we are in an ice age.  for most of earth's history there were no massive, constantly frozen areas.


Well, technically, we are in an interregnum between Ice Ages (the Holocene). However, we are also part of the Pleistocene period, which has been rather chilly compared to the planet for most of its history.


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#9    BigDaddy_GFS

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 04:27 AM

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so they saying it had a big penis  laugh.gif  laugh.gif  laugh.gif das classic


That would make it a Phallisaurus Rex.
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#10    crazy_sherlock

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 09:20 AM

hahahaha shold b coled PENISsaurus Rex nyahahahah


#11    frogfish

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 05:52 PM

....You are all of topic (not Guardsman Bass and FrothyDog).

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much of Antarctica was still farther south than the Antarctic circle

Not back in the mesozoic era...It was much higher than Australia...The Equator ran through it!

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#12    Guardsman Bass

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 06:28 AM

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....You are all of topic (not Guardsman Bass and FrothyDog).
Not back in the mesozoic era...It was much higher than Australia...The Equator ran through it!


Not in the particular time period of the Mesozoic (the Cretaceous) that I am talking about. It was more northerly than it is now, but much of it was still south of the Antarctic Circle.


"You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your custom. And then we will follow ours." -Sir Charles Napier

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#13    Lord Umbarger

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 02:47 PM

Phallisaurus Rex, I now have a name!

Sorry for going off topic, that was just too good a chance to pass up.

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#14    Conspiracy

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:46 AM

cool, neat when they find skeletons of dinos in antartica tongue.gif

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#15    pbarosso

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 10:11 AM

well antarctica was warm because it was at one time connected to south america and india-africa australia. i saw a show on the science channel just last night. the warm equatorial currnets in the ocean brought warm air down around the continents, even though it was at or near the pole. since it became a separate continent, the currents are deflected back north in a circular pattern, there are three main currents; the pacific, atlantic, and indian ocean currents.

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