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#46    Azaezel

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 07:19 AM

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Changing the atmosphere does not change carbon dating...Sorry no.gif


You're very wrong. The atmosphere has a significant effect on carbon dating - so much so that archaeologists almost always take atmospheric conditions into account, if they are able to. Respect.

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#47    fantazum

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 08:15 AM

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No details about it. I heard part of this before. The thought ran through my head in Geography class.  

At one time underground, there was a large body of water (under the present Atlantic Ocean) but erupted (the present Mid-Atlantic Trench) and forced apart the Pangaea and rained for 40 days & 40 nights, which killed the dinosaurs. Although dino fossils date back millions of years, could that much water and setiment stirring around hasten the fossilization to throw off carbon dating? Just an idea.


You are right and yet wrong; yes there is a vast amount of water trapped within the Earth's crust and mantle. All rock contains water and when there is volcanic action that water is released. I have a theory that the world during the Dinosaur period did not have anywhere near as much water on its surface as it does today. The land surface during the Dinosaur period was much greater which answers why Dinosaurs thrived and evolved for 150 million years without eating themselves out of existance. It is now believed that the larger Dinosaurs existed in  herds perhaps as large as 2,000 members or perhaps even larger.
A herd of African Elephants 100 members strong, can clear 2 acres a day of foliage...you do the math!
Volcanic action on the scale of the Deccan,Siberian or Yellowstone scale and even larger has happened and if that level of volcanic action took place simultaneously then the amount of water released would be gigantic. Crustal shift could occur with tectonic plate movement accelerated resulting in rapid topographical changes including crustal folding. The Poles would melt as they shifted,  regions previously glaciated would melt,regions under permafrost would melt. Dont forget that Antarctica was once positioned in a temperate climate.
And of course volcanic action on such a scale would be more than enough to produce a mass extinction event.


#48    kobie

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 12:34 PM

weve had volcanic extintions...that this was one of the most dramatic and ferocious of all which nearly ceased life all together....weve had numerous acounts of metor and astroid extinction on all graded levels...there has be evedently caterstophic floods but not on the extinction level......weve had ice age extinctions from axis tilts and global dis-balancing and eco-spherical movment....but there was a time when the earth was 98% water....its not documented as science fact but a theory that may be when the earth was coverd in water and little land that its quite plausible to say an extinction could of took place by using the extinction method of the pervian era in a time of great water coverage....now that would of been a sight...but at this time i doubt any form of homosyaphian existed then...

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now we do no that there has been many document scientific facts that there has been many of a time been cataclsmic events that have been text by old historians or religious folloings but exact dates are impossible...the fall of atlantis...pompai...southern mediterianian....all over the world but to pin point these events are nearly impossible...i beleive that dinosaurs where infact wiped out by an on chain of a series of terrible events in the end few that fell into mammal catergory where obviously the most adabterble species to servive such an turn of events....only the most adabtible and strongest survive....dinosaurs where not just of reptilian species the had a wide range....avian...mammal...amphibian...oceanic...even cross species...

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#49    frogfish

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 06:45 PM

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All rock contains water and when there is volcanic action that water is released.

Are you serious? Stop the BS. Rock does not 'hold' water. There was no huge flood.

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#50    fantazum

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 12:00 AM

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Are you serious? Stop the BS. Rock does not 'hold' water. There was no huge flood.


You cannot be serious in claiming that there has never been any large scale flooding on the Earth' surface due to climate change . I thought you were knowledgeable in this subject but you disappoint me and I will not respond to your posts in future
However for your education I will add the following:

"Water has always been present on Earth, in one form or another. It was present, as ice and in water-bearing minerals called clays, in the planetesimals that the Earth was built from, and more water arrived in the form of comets. Some water, in the form of vapor and ice crystals, has always been present in the atmosphere of the Earth. Water vapor is also released from the Earth's interior by volcanoes.

But, I am being a little coy . . . I am guessing that you are wondering when Earth first had liquid water. The answer is probably earlier than you think! The Earth is about four and a half billion years old. It's difficult to study what the Earth was like back then, because the Earth's crust is constantly being recycled, and very few rocks are that old. However, we do have a little bit of rock that is 4,400,000,000 years old, found on the continent of Australia. This rock shows evidence that the surface of the Earth was solid and cool when this rock solidified, just 600,000,000 years after the Earth was formed!

There was even liquid water present where this rock solidified!

So as far back as we have geological evidence of what the Earth was like, there was liquid water present.

There are two ways that water can be included in rock. It can exist as a solid, liquid or gas trapped in pore spaces (holes) in the rock. Water molecules can also be trapped and included as part of the crystal structure of the rock.

In the first case, the water exists in holes in the rock, as you describe in your question. We think that most of Mars (the equatorial region) can't support this kind of pore-space water trapping in the upper part of the surface because the planet is dry and the atmospheric pressure is low. New Mars Odyssey results show that there may be this kind of water trapping near the poles of Mars, however.

In the second case, the water is actually bound up in the rock, changing the mineralogy. For example opal is actually quartz (SiO2) with water molecules in the crystal structure. So the chemical formula is then SiO2*H2O. Other good examples include the clay minerals. These minerals have places in their crystal structure that can accomodate water molecules. Clays consist of layered sheets of atoms (for example Si, Al, Mg, O, etc.) that are bound together. The sheets themselves are only loosely bound together, and in many cases water molecules can become trapped between these sheets and can bind loosely to the sheets above and below. So when these clays get wet, the water is actually trapped by the crystal and becomes bound; it's not just trapped in holes in the rock. Some clays are extremely expansive (they can accomodate several layers of water moleules in between layers of silicates) and can cause serious damage when they absorb water. On Earth, clays are very common. Mars has such a dessicating environment that we think clays (if there are any) are probably isolated in specific regions. The Mars Odyssey craft also shows some hydrogen detections near the equatorial regions, and some people think that these may be places where water is trapped chemically in minerals. "

Source: http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=423








#51    frogfish

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:13 PM

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subject but you disappoint me and I will not respond to your posts in future

You have no knowledge at all on this subject!!!!!

Yes, water molecules exist in rock. AlHCO3, PBHCO3, etc. But the water is not actually water. The H and O exist in separate anions or cations. When you crack open rocks, water does not gush out. Like the article said, it is CHEMICALLY trapped in rock. But when there is volcanism or other geologic movements, water does not come from the rock.

Underground aquifers, that's a different story thumbsup.gif

Maybe when you refute something, you might want to check that your statement is relevant thumbsup.gif



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