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Biggest Carnivorous Dino Finally Confirmed


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#1    draconic chronicler

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 01:01 AM

This was one of the earliest debates on the paleontology forum, but since then a huge Spinosaur skull over six feet long was discovered which now proves this was the biggest Theropod dino yet discovered.  Ironically, the dino advisors believed this years ago when making Jurasic Park III.  Scaling up earlier fossils to the huge new skull, this new Spino is estimated at being 55 to 60 feet long.  All other contenders still hover around 45 feet as the largest so any more debate is pointless now.  Sorry Frogfish, guess I was right after all   grin2.gif


#2    BurnSide

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 01:04 AM

Can you provide the source for your information containing the discovery of the Skull?


#3    angrycrustacean

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 01:11 AM

This site mentions the possibility of an 8 foot skull, but no reliable sources. Unless of course DC is talking about an actual confirmation about that skull.

Edit: Found a better link: Yahoo News Story

Although the fact that it's only skull fragments is kind of disappointing.

Edited by angrycrustacean, 28 March 2006 - 01:13 AM.

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#4    BurnSide

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 01:16 AM

Thank's crusty. Informative.


#5    frogfish

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 02:13 AM

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This was one of the earliest debates on the paleontology forum, but since then a huge Spinosaur skull over six feet long was discovered which now proves this was the biggest Theropod dino yet discovered. Ironically, the dino advisors believed this years ago when making Jurasic Park III. Scaling up earlier fossils to the huge new skull, this new Spino is estimated at being 55 to 60 feet long. All other contenders still hover around 45 feet as the largest so any more debate is pointless now. Sorry Frogfish, guess I was right after all

You could be right, but the doubt that it is an INCOMPLETE skull...It is ESTIMATED at 6 feet long...Ever hear of Saurophaganax? Its a giant theropod suspected of being a subfamily of Allosaurs...from it's incomplete skeleton, it is estimated at 50-60 feet long...

You stand corrected?

Edited by frogfish, 28 March 2006 - 02:14 AM.

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#6    fantazum

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 01:02 AM

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This was one of the earliest debates on the paleontology forum, but since then a huge Spinosaur skull over six feet long was discovered which now proves this was the biggest Theropod dino yet discovered.  Ironically, the dino advisors believed this years ago when making Jurasic Park III.  Scaling up earlier fossils to the huge new skull, this new Spino is estimated at being 55 to 60 feet long.  All other contenders still hover around 45 feet as the largest so any more debate is pointless now.  Sorry Frogfish, guess I was right after all   grin2.gif


Considering the astronomic odds against any living creature being preserved sufficiently for scientific study millions of years later, one must wonder at the size these creatures really attained and the numbers in which they existed. And when discussing these monstors I always have to remind myself that the remains of the first dinosaur was only revealed a little over a century and half ago and that we are literally only scratching the surface in our study of this species.
We all can expect some surprises over the next century of research and discovery.


#7    draconic chronicler

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 02:28 AM

You are right fantazum.  The greatest and most unique dino may not have been found yet.   The interesting thing about the Spino is that though rare, the two major finds were both from huge animals.  The original was over 40 feet long but still a juvenile because of lack of fusion in the bones.  This new one may easily have been 60 feet long.  With such a small sample, we do not even know if we found a "large" adult speciment yet!  Though in the case of T Rex, enough specimens have been found to suggest they normally attain a length just over 40 feet.


#8    Pilgrim_Shadow

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 02:40 AM

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You are right fantazum.  The greatest and most unique dino may not have been found yet.   The interesting thing about the Spino is that though rare, the two major finds were both from huge animals.  The original was over 40 feet long but still a juvenile because of lack of fusion in the bones.  This new one may easily have been 60 feet long.  With such a small sample, we do not even know if we found a "large" adult speciment yet!  Though in the case of T Rex, enough specimens have been found to suggest they normally attain a length just over 40 feet.


A somewhat more sobering thought is that, given the odds against fossilization are astronomical, there are thousands, even millions of species of which we will never find any trace whatsoever. Countless more we will know only from fragmentary evidence, like Deinocherious.

One hundred million years from now, it may be our bones lying forgotten in the dirt...

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#9    frogfish

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 02:14 AM

Deinocherius, a relative of Avimimus could of reached lengths of 40 feet and possible be the fastest dinosaur ever....Sadly, it is only known from a 7-foot long arm.

Still, no challengers to Saurophaganax?

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#10    Glacies

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 03:43 AM

That's incredible, what a large beast. though i've still got a soft spot in my heart for the t-rex. yes.gif

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#11    draconic chronicler

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 03:34 PM

I don't think any Paleontologist would agree with you frogfish.  Spino is now that biggest, hands down.


#12    frogfish

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 05:40 PM

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I don't think any Paleontologist would agree with you frogfish

Why not, just because there is a dinosaur possibly larger than Spinosaurus doesn't mean paleontologists disagree....I think your BIAS played a bigger role in that statements, as many paleontologist acknowledge Saurophaganax.

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#13    Moose-Of-Armageddon

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 08:10 PM

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Deinocherius, a relative of Avimimus could of reached lengths of 40 feet and possible be the fastest dinosaur ever....Sadly, it is only known from a 7-foot long arm.

Still, no challengers to Saurophaganax?


Frogfish, you are right in some ways. Yes, Deinocheirus had the longest arms of any theropod, and is estimated to actually be a 35-foot dinosaur that hunted little but mammals and insects. Those hands were large enough to actually fit a 6-year old boy in them full scoop (Yes, the hands is actually longer than the arm itself, largely because of the massive 2-foot long claws. And, Draconic, you stand correct in other ways. Spino is one of the longest theropod currently discovered, but, however, is NOT the largest. The title of largest theropod belongs to a very new, unknown species known as Gigantosaurus, meaning 'Gigantic Reptile'. This Argentinian dinosaur could grow up to lengths of 15m when fully grown and could weight well over a good 7-8 tonnes. Spinosaurus grew to 12m at very best and weighed a decent 5-6 tonnes. Gigantosaurus actually fed off of the mighty saurapod Argentinosaurus. It was a member of the Allosaur family and for a big guy, it could run. 30km/h in short bursts, actually (Roughly the same as T-Rex, which weighed 500-700 pounds less and was about 10m long) Argentinosaurus has been documented and shown on TV a few times, but not much of the public know of the true 'Tyrant Lizard King'.

Plus, according to fossil files, databases and books, fellow American Spinosaur Acrocanthosaurus was actually larger than Spinosaurus tongue.gif

And please, don't try to create an argument concerning my knowledge of the Mezozoic Era, or thou shall eat my dust tongue.gif

Edited by Moose-Of-Armageddon, 01 April 2006 - 08:12 PM.

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#14    Pilgrim_Shadow

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 08:49 PM

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Frogfish, you are right in some ways. Yes, Deinocheirus had the longest arms of any theropod, and is estimated to actually be a 35-foot dinosaur that hunted little but mammals and insects. Those hands were large enough to actually fit a 6-year old boy in them full scoop (Yes, the hands is actually longer than the arm itself, largely because of the massive 2-foot long claws. And, Draconic, you stand correct in other ways. Spino is one of the longest theropod currently discovered, but, however, is NOT the largest. The title of largest theropod belongs to a very new, unknown species known as Gigantosaurus, meaning 'Gigantic Reptile'. This Argentinian dinosaur could grow up to lengths of 15m when fully grown and could weight well over a good 7-8 tonnes. Spinosaurus grew to 12m at very best and weighed a decent 5-6 tonnes. Gigantosaurus actually fed off of the mighty saurapod Argentinosaurus. It was a member of the Allosaur family and for a big guy, it could run. 30km/h in short bursts, actually (Roughly the same as T-Rex, which weighed 500-700 pounds less and was about 10m long) Argentinosaurus has been documented and shown on TV a few times, but not much of the public know of the true 'Tyrant Lizard King'.

Plus, according to fossil files, databases and books, fellow American Spinosaur Acrocanthosaurus was actually larger than Spinosaurus tongue.gif

And please, don't try to create an argument concerning my knowledge of the Mezozoic Era, or thou shall eat my dust tongue.gif


With all due respect, I think you are mistaken. I have seen photographs of the deinocherious fossil, and while they would no doubt be sufficient to scoop a 6-year-old boy up, the hands are most definately not longer than the arms. They are quite large in proportion to the arms, but not longer by any stretch of the imagination.

Sadly, this reconstruction was all that I could find on-line, however, the illustration clearly shows that the arm is far longer than the hand. Perhaps you meant that the hand is longer than the individual bones of the arm? That certainly is possible.

[attachmentid=24436]

And giganotosaurus is hardly a new discovery. It was the largest theropod known when I was still in high school, ten years ago. Given how quickly the field of paleontology moves a decade is quite a long time indeed. Also, I have found at least one reliable source (the Natural History Museum of London) which lists spinosaurus as being considerably longer than giganotosaurus (16m for the former, 12m for the latter). Various sources do suggest a considerable range of estimates for giganotosaurus's size, from 12 to 14m, but it seems that 12m is the most widely accepted figure.

However, in terms of mass, giganotosaurus is universally listed as being the larger overall, at least in the sources I have found.

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#15    Moose-Of-Armageddon

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 09:17 PM

When I said Deinocheirus' hands were bigger than it's arms, I did mean the individual bones, plus the structure in which the bones are layed out and the fact that part of the arm is useless anyway.

And overall, yes, Gigantosaurus is classified as the biggest, because of it's sheer size and bulk.

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