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International Space Station Status Report


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#61    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 08:49 PM

April 13, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-20

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-20


HOUSTON - The crew members aboard the International Space Station were busy this week with handover operations from the Expedition 14 residents to the newly arrived Expedition 15 crew.

Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov arrived at the station Monday after a Saturday launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. With them on their Soyuz TMA-10 spacecraft was Spaceflight Participant Charles Simonyi, a U.S. businessman flying under a contract with the Russian Federal Space Agency.

Yurchikhin, Kotov and Simonyi were greeted by the station's current crew, Expedition 14 Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria and flight engineers Mikhail Tyurin and Suni Williams.

Williams, who has served as an Expedition 14 crew member since December, will remain on the station providing Expedition 15 with an experienced flight engineer for the early part of its mission. She is scheduled to return home aboard space shuttle Endeavour this summer.

Lopez-Alegria and Tyurin are scheduled to return home in their Soyuz TMA-9 spacecraft April 20. Simonyi will return with them after spending approximately 11 days aboard the station.

Crews performed required station maintenance and spent considerable time on scientific studies. Those activities began with time-critical transfer of several experiments from the newly arrived Soyuz to the station and station power.

On Tuesday, Tyurin conducted the Russian experiment Bioemulsion, an effort to develop technology to produce microorganisms safely for bacterial, fermental and medical preparations.

On Wednesday, Kotov set up the European Exhaled Nitric Oxide-2 experiment, which measures nitric oxide exhaled before and after spacewalks. Its objective is to better understand the potential for decompression sickness.

Meanwhile, Tyurin worked with the Russian Pilot experiment, which is designed to measure the long-duration spaceflight changes in a crew member's ability to pilot a spacecraft.

On Thursday, Lopez-Alegria spent more than three hours resizing U.S. spacesuits for future users. The suits were worn on an unprecedented series of three station spacewalks during a nine-day period beginning Jan. 31.

Throughout much of the week, beginning with the crew news conference on Tuesday, crew members took breaks to talk with news media representatives, including ABC News, Space.com, CNN, and CBS.

The crew planned to eat on Friday a special Martha Stewart-catered meal of quail, duck, rice pudding and dried fruits.

Additionally, both crews performed their regular exercise sessions this week. These sessions are particularly important for Lopez-Alegria and Tyurin, who will soon return to Earth and the effects of gravity.

Williams is scheduled to run the Boston Marathon using a station treadmill Monday at 9 a.m. CDT to coincide with the race on the ground. This will be the first time an astronaut in space is an official participant in a marathon.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:


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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-20

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#62    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 01:44 AM

April 20, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-21

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-21


HOUSTON - The crew members aboard the International Space Station spent this week finalizing handover operations, conducting experiments and preparing for the departure of the Expedition 14 crew.

Expedition 14 Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria and Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin, accompanied by Spaceflight Participant Charles Simonyi, are targeted to touch down in central Kazakhstan in their Soyuz spacecraft at 7:30 a.m. CDT Saturday, April 21, one day later than originally planned.

The primary landing site is too wet for landing operations due to the spring thaw. The one-day delay in departure from the station will allow for touchdown in a landing zone further to the south.

The landing will conclude a 215-day flight for Lopez-Alegria and Tyurin and mark the longest single flight by an American astronaut. Live coverage of the landing operations will begin on NASA TV on Saturday at 12:30 a.m. for hatch closing, will return at 3:45 a.m. for undocking, and will resume at 6:15 a.m. for the deorbit burn and landing.

Crew members held a ceremony Tuesday afternoon marking the change of command of the station from Lopez-Alegria to Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin. Yurchikhin and flight engineers Oleg Kotov and Suni Williams are now officially established on board the station. Williams, who served as an Expedition 14 crew member since December, will provide Expedition 15 with an experienced flight engineer for the early part of its mission.

On Monday, Williams became the first person to run a marathon in space. Williams, an accomplished marathoner, was an official entrant in the Boston Marathon and ran the 26.2 mile race on a station treadmill in the Zvezda module, circling Earth at least twice in the process. Williams' run coincided with the tens of thousands of people running on the ground. She completed her marathon with an official time of 4:23:10.

Russian specialists are preparing plans to repair the Condensate Feed Unit in the Russian system that processes condensate recovered in the U.S. segment of the station into potable water. Since the unit failed over the weekend, the supply of drinking water has been decreasing faster than the replenishment rate. Even if they are unable to repair the unit, enough water already is onboard to last until the ISS Progress 25 cargo vehicle docks in mid-May, providing a new supply of water.

Also this week, Lopez-Alegria completed his final session with the Anomalous Long-Term Effects in Astronauts' Center Nervous System (ALTEA) experiment, which investigates the phenomenon of crew members seeing flashes of light while in orbit. Using an instrumented helmet, the experiment measures the cosmic radiation that passes through a crew member's head, brain activity and visual perception. ALTEA should help researchers better understand what levels of cosmic radiation crew members are exposed to and develop countermeasures for future long-duration spaceflights.

Lopez-Alegria and Williams also worked on an Education Payload Operations activity linked to the International Polar Year. The crew members videotaped their Earth photography activities and their observations of sea ice and auroras. These images will be used later in NASA education videos sent to classrooms around the world. Education Payload Operations include curriculum-based activities that demonstrate basic principles of science, mathematics, technology, engineering and geography. They are designed to support the NASA mission of inspiring the next generation of explorers.

The next station status report will be issued Saturday after Expedition 14's landing, or earlier if events warrant.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:


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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-21

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#63    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 09:28 PM

April 21, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-22

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-22


HOUSTON - The 14th crew of the International Space Station, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria and Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin, along with spaceflight participant Charles Simonyi landed their Soyuz spacecraft in the steppes of Kazakhstan at 7:31 a.m CDT Saturday.

The Expedition 14 mission included many highlights during its seven-month duration, including the setting of several records. Lopez-Alegria completed five spacewalks, which gave him a total of 10 for his career. This set a U.S. record for not only number of spacewalks, but also cumulative spacewalk time, 57 hours, 40 minutes. He also set a U.S. record for a single spaceflight's duration with more than 215 days. This tops the 196-day mark, previously set by station crew members Dan Bursch and Carl Walz in 2001 and 2002.

During the mission Flight Engineer Sunita Williams set the record for number of space walks and total time spent on spacewalks by a woman. She participated in four space walks for a total of 29 hours and 17 minutes. Williams will remain on the station for the first part of the new mission.

Three of the crew's spacewalks were conducted over the course of nine days, an unprecedented schedule for a station crew. Starting from scratch, it takes about 100 crew-member hours to prepare for a spacewalk. By doing them a few days apart, considerable crew time can be saved by not having to repeat some of those preparatory steps.

Before closing the Soyuz-station hatches at 1:03 a.m. Saturday, Lopez-Alegria and Tyurin said farewell to the Expedition 15 crew, Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, flight engineers Oleg Kotov and Williams. The new crew and Simonyi launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on April 7 and arrived at the station on April 9. Simonyi, a U.S. businessman, spent 12 days aboard the station under a contract with the Russian Federal Space Agency.

Lopez-Alegria and Tyurin will now spend several weeks in Star City, near Moscow, for debriefing and medical examinations. Their return to Earth was originally scheduled for Friday, April 20, but was delayed due to wet ground conditions, which could have precluded helicopter operations. The one-day change allowed for touchdown in a landing zone farther to the south.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:


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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-22

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#64    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 09:52 PM

April 27, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-23

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-23


HOUSTON - The Expedition 15 crew aboard the International Space Station completed its first week of station orientation as the crew worked with experiments and hardware maintenance.

Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and flight engineers Oleg Kotov and Suni Williams began the week with a couple light duty days after the busy handover operations with the former crew. Expedition 14 Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria and Russian crewmate Mikhail Tyurin, accompanied by spaceflight participant Charles Simonyi, returned to Earth on Saturday, April 21, and are at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, for several weeks of post-mission debriefing and rehabilitation.

This week, the station crew members participated in several drills to maintain their medical and emergency proficiency. Yurchikhin and Kotov began sessions throughout the first two weeks of their residence to orient themselves with the station's operating systems. Williams, who served as an Expedition 14 crew member, is aiding Expedition 15 with their station orientation.

On Thursday, Williams was told that she will return to Earth aboard space shuttle Atlantis, targeted for launch June 8. That shuttle mission, STS-117, will carry astronaut Clay Anderson to the station to join Expedition 15 in progress. This rotation originally was planned for STS-118, targeted for launch Aug. 8.

NASA managers approved the crew rotation after a more detailed review determined it would not impact station operations or future shuttle mission objectives. Since an earlier crew rotation was possible, they decided it would be prudent to return Williams and deliver Anderson sooner rather than later. Upon Williams' return, she will have accumulated more time in space than any other woman.

Williams spent some of her off-duty time completing additional test runs for the Capillary Flow Experiment. Capillary flow is the key process used to move fluids in a microgravity environment. It uses the low-gravity environment aboard the station to understand the special dynamics of capillary flow and will aid in the design of fluid transport systems on future spacecraft.

On Monday, Williams set up cameras for the Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students, or EarthKAM, education experiment. Middle school students program a digital camera on the station to photograph a variety of geographical targets from the unique vantage point of space. Undergraduate teams at the University of California at San Diego manage the images and post them on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view. Nearly 4,000 students from 66 schools in seven countries are participating in this run.

On Friday, Williams performed a series of test flights with small free-flying satellites. The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) experiment uses 8-inch diameter spherical satellites that fly within the station cabin. The satellites test the basics of formation flight and autonomous docking that could be used in future spacecraft. The battery-powered satellites use carbon dioxide to fuel 12 thrusters as they fly in the cabin.

In addition to general station orientation, Yurchikhin and Kotov also performed maintenance work on life support hardware in the Russian segment. The water separator in the air conditioning system was replaced. The separator dispositions condensate water and air collected from the station's atmosphere that forms through the air conditioner, maintaining optimum humidity levels onboard.

Flight controllers and mission managers test fired the two main engines on the Zvezda Service Module in a Wednesday reboost, raising the station's altitude. It was the first time the engines were fired since initial arrival of Zvezda in 2000. Another reboost using International Space Station Progress 24 engines is scheduled for Saturday to finish placing the station in its correct position for the arrival of the International Space Station Progress 25 cargo vehicle May 15 and the space shuttle Atlantis in June.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:


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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-23

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#65    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 09:09 PM

May 4, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-24

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-24


HOUSTON - Marking the second week working together, the Expedition 15 crew wrapped up a week of various maintenance tasks, science experiments and preparations for the May 15 arrival of the Progress 25 supply ship.

To prepare for the new unpiloted cargo carrier's arrival, the currently docked Progress' engines were used to reboost the station Saturday. The move increases the number of rendezvous opportunities for the STS-117 space shuttle mission targeted for next month. Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and flight engineers Oleg Kotov and Suni Williams also removed the docking mechanism from the Progress 24 for later use.

The week included work on a wide array of science experiments. Williams completed the fifth run of the Elastic Memory Composite Hinge experiment. The experiment studies the performance of a new hinge composite in space.

Williams also did a test run of a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances on board the station. This study is meant to provide an early warning system to protect the health and safety of station crew members. Williams also completed annual re-certification of the Microgravity Science Glovebox and performed a checkout of the cardiac defibrillator.

Kotov did maintenance work in the Zarya module and tested the circuits of a temperature sensor on one of the batteries. He also conducted the periodic collection of air readings in the station with the Russian Real-Time Harmful Contaminant Gas Analyzer system.

Other hardware and maintenance tasks included the replacement of a Common Cabin Air Analyzer, sound level monitoring in the Russian Service Module and in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, and charging U.S. spacesuits batteries.

Crew members wrapped up the week replacing a heat exchanger in the Zvezda Service Module. They also swapped out computers used in the U.S. lab racks.

The weekend will consist of mostly off-duty time with routine housekeeping, family conferences and a HAM radio session.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:


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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-24

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#66    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 04:39 PM

May 11, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-25

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-25


A new cargo freighter launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 10:25 p.m. CDT Friday with more than 2.5 tons of fuel, air, water and other supplies and equipment aboard.

The ISS Progress 25 unpiloted cargo carrier is scheduled to dock with the station Tuesday at 12:10 a.m., bringing more than 1,050 pounds of propellant, almost 100 pounds of air, more than 925 pounds of water and 3,042 pounds of dry cargo -- a total of 5,125 pounds. NASA TV coverage of the docking will begin at 11:30 p.m. Monday.

The spacecraft will use the automated Kurs system to dock at the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module. Should human intervention be necessary, Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin will be at the manual TORU docking system controls.

On Tuesday, Yurchikhin and flight engineers Suni Williams and Oleg Kotov tested communications between the station and the docked ISS Progress 24. On Wednesday, in recognition of the Russian holiday Victory Day, marking the end of World War II, the crew performed only necessary station activities.

On Thursday, Kotov worked with a breathing experiment, while Williams and Yurchikhin spent about three hours replacing a frayed steel rope on a gyroscope on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System, or TVIS. The gyroscope is part of the system that keeps vibrations created by an exercising crew member from being transmitted to the rest of the station, where it could interfere with delicate experiments. Williams and Yurchikhin wrapped up the work on Friday.

Additionally on Thursday, flight controllers tested the failed Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) 3. The test involved tilting the CMG in different directions at different speeds to determine what effect, if any, friction had on the movement. The 600-pound gyroscope itself, one of four that controls the stationís orientation in space, was not spun up. It will be replaced this summer during the STS-118 mission.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

The next station status report will be issued Tuesday, May 15, after the Progress 25 docking, or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-25

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#67    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 09:00 PM

May 15, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-26

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-26


A spacecraft automatically docked to the International Space Station early Tuesday, delivering 2.5 tons of food, fuel and supplies for the residents on board.

The ISS Progress 25 linked up to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module at 12:10 a.m. CDT Tuesday as the station sailed 208 miles above the Earth off the northeast coast of Australia. Within minutes, hooks and latches engaged between the two spacecraft to form a tight seal. The hatch to the supply ship will be opened overnight to enable its cargo to be unloaded.

As the Progress approached for its docking, Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov stood by in Zvezda in case they needed to take over manual control of the linkup. The docking, under the guidance of the Kurs automatic rendezvous system, was smooth and uneventful. Flight Engineer Suni Williams monitored other station systems and photographed the Progressí approach.

The Kurs proximity antenna was retracted earlier than usual, at a distance of about 148 meters. This enabled Russian flight controllers to confirm it was functioning properly, since it failed to retract during the Progress 23 docking last October. In February, the Expedition 14 crew conducted a spacewalk to fix the problem.

The unpiloted ship launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 10:25 p.m. CDT Friday for its three-day journey to the station. The Progress delivered more than 1,050 pounds of propellant, almost 100 pounds of air, more than 925 pounds of water and 3,042 pounds of dry cargo.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

The next station status report will be issued Friday, May 18, or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-26

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#68    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 09:40 PM

May 18, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-27

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-27


HOUSTON - This week, the Expedition 15 crew unpacked new supplies and began preparing for the arrival of the next visiting spacecraft and two upcoming spacewalks at the International Space Station.

The ISS Progress 25 docked to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module at 12:10 a.m. CDT Tuesday. During the week, the crew began unloading the more than 5,000 pounds of cargo from the supply ship.

Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov prepared for their May 30 and June 6 spacewalks by working on the Pirs Airlock. The cosmonauts will wear Russian Orlan spacesuits to install orbital debris protection panels on the Zvezda Service Module and replace experiments on the module's hull. Mission experts at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, will provide an overview of the spacewalks in a news briefing at 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, on NASA Television.

The crew prepared for the arrival of space shuttle Atlantis, which is targeted to launch on June 8. Yurchikhin and Kotov practiced digital photography techniques for their role in the inspection of the shuttle's heat shield as it approaches the station for the joint STS-117 mission. Flight Engineer Suni Williams assembled a spacewalk tool and wrapped it in protective tape to be used if spacewalkers need help with retracting the P6 starboard solar array.

On Thursday, the crew called its colleagues working at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Aquarius undersea laboratory for the 12th NASA Extreme Environments Mission Operations (NEEMO). A flight surgeon, two astronauts and a Cincinnati doctor completed their 12-day mission Friday. That crew tested space medicine concepts, robotic telesurgery operations and moon-walking techniques. With its unique environment, Aquarius is an ideal training facility for future spaceflight. Williams was a member of the second NEEMO mission in May 2002.

On Friday, Williams completed an additional run of the Elastic Memory Composite Hinge experiment, which studies the performance of a new type of composite hinge to determine if it is suitable for use in space. The experiment uses elastic memory hinges to move an attached mass at one end. Materials tested in this experiment are stronger and lighter than current material used in space hinges and could be used in the design of future spacecraft.

Additionally, the crew spoke with C-SPAN, and Williams participated in interviews with two hometown Boston television stations.

On Saturday, Williams is expected to update software on the station support laptops.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/station

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-27

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#69    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 09:16 PM

May 25, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-28

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-28


HOUSTON - Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov prepared this week for two spacewalks while Flight Engineer Suni Williams prepared for her return to Earth. In preparation for her successor's arrival, Williams' downlinked a 10-minute video tour for Clayton Anderson, who will travel to the station on the upcoming space shuttle flight.

Mission managers gave a "go" for a May 30 Russian spacewalk to install orbital debris protection panels on the Zvezda service module and a GPS antenna cable associated with Automated Transfer Vehicle navigation systems. This will be the 18th Russian spacewalk in support of station assembly and maintenance. The spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 1:20 p.m. CDT and last approximately six hours. NASA Television coverage will begin at 12:30 p.m.

First-time spacewalkers Yurchikhin and Kotov checked out the spacesuits and the Pirs airlock, prepared their tools, and closed the hatch to the Progress resupply vehicle docked to Pirs. Williams, who will help coordinate the spacewalk from inside the station, also prepared U.S. tools that will be used. During the spacewalk, the cosmonauts will retrieve a package, known as the "Christmas tree," which contains three bundles of debris panels. They were temporarily stowed on Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 during the STS-116 mission last December. After transferring the panels to Zvezda, Yurchikhin and Kotov will install the panels from one bundle. The others will be installed during their June 6 Russian spacewalk. Mission managers this week conducted a preliminary review of that spacewalk.

Williams this week installed updated software on the station's laptop computers, replaced the elastic "flex packs" in two Resistive Exercise Device canisters used to simulate weightlifting in the absence of gravity, and worked out on a stationary bicycle while medical experts on the ground measured her oxygen intake as part of a periodic fitness evaluation.

The crew members also prepared for the arrival of space shuttle Atlantis, targeted to launch on June 8. Yurchikhin and Kotov reviewed a recent digital photography practice session with shuttle imagery specialists, and Williams assembled a spacewalk tool to be used by shuttle astronauts who will retract the P6 starboard solar array. Along with filming the station video, Suni Williams also spoke with Clayton Anderson to help him prepare for his mission. It will begin officially when his specially-fitted Soyuz seat liner is transferred from Atlantis to the station during the STS-117 mission.

On Wednesday, Russian flight controllers executed an orbit adjustment burn, increasing the station's speed about one mile an hour and putting it in the proper orbit for Atlantis' arrival.

The Expedition 15 crew also participated in interviews with WBZ Radio, CBS Radio, ABC News and MSNBC.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/station

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-28

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#70    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 04:08 PM

May 31, 2007
John Yembric
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-29

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-29


Two International Space Station cosmonauts stepped outside Wednesday for a 5-hour, 25-minute spacewalk, installing Service Module Debris Protection panels and rerouting a Global Positioning System antenna cable.

Wearing Russian Orlan spacesuits, Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov began their spacewalk from the Russian Pirs airlock at 2:05 p.m. CDT. The spacewalk was scheduled to begin at 1:20 p.m., but was delayed due to time required to troubleshoot a communications problem.

First, the cosmonauts moved to the Strela 2, one of the hand-operated, telescoping cranes at the base of Pirs. They attached an extension to the Strela boom, increasing its reach from 45 to 60 feet. With Kotov on the end of the extension, Yurchikhin extended the boom to a point over Pressurized Mating Adapter 3, or PMA-3, on the Unity connecting node.

Once in place, Yurchikhin, with guidance from Kotov, maneuvered the Strela end effector to a grapple fixture on an adapter stowage rack. The adapter is attached to PMA-3 and held three bundles of 17 debris panels. The assembly is dubbed the "Christmas Tree."

Once the Christmas Tree was attached to the Strela and released from PMA-3, Yurchikhin moved it and Kotov back to the small diameter of the Zvezda Module. Yurchikhin joined Kotov there, and together they secured it to a grapple fixture on Zvezda.

Next, they left the debris panel task and moved aft onto Zvezda's large conical section. There they rerouted a cable for a Global Positioning System to be used for future rendezvous operations with the European Automated Transfer Vehicle. The ATV is an unpiloted cargo carrier with almost twice the capacity of the Progress cargo craft. It is scheduled to make its first launch later this year.

Once that task was completed, the cosmonauts moved back to the Christmas Tree on the forward end of Zvezda, where they removed and opened one of the three bundles of debris panels. That bundle held five panels. The aluminum panels vary in size but are about an inch thick. They typically measure about 2 by 3 feet and weigh 15 to 20 pounds.

Yurchikhin and Kotov installed the five panels on Zvezda's forward section, the area between Zvezda's large and small diameters.

After the installation task, the spacewalkers moved back to Pirs and into the airlock. Hatch closure marking the end of the spacewalk was at 7:30 p.m.

This was the first spacewalk for Yurchikhin and Kotov. On their second, scheduled for June 6, the remaining 12 debris panels will be installed on Zvezda. Additionally, the cosmonauts also will install a section of an Ethernet cable on the Zarya module and a Russian experiment called Biorisk on Pirs.

The three bundles and their adapter were delivered by space shuttle Discovery during the STS-116 mission in December 2006 and attached to PMA-3 by spacewalkers Bob Curbeam and Sunita Williams. Williams, an Expedition 15 crew member, remained aboard the station as the intravehicular officer for Wednesday's spacewalk, advising and keeping the spacewalkers on schedule.

Six debris panels were previously installed during an August 2002 spacewalk by Expedition 5 Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson. Those panels were delivered to the station by space shuttle Endeavour during the STS-111 mission in June 2002.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

The next station status report will be issued Friday, June 1, or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-29

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 01 June 2007 - 10:11 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#71    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 10:10 PM

June 1, 2007
John Yembric
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-30

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-30


HOUSTON - The Expedition 15 crew completed the first of three planned spacewalks this week and prepared for the upcoming arrival of space shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station.

On Wednesday, Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov stepped outside the station and installed five additional debris protection panels on the conical section of the Zvezda Service Module, the area between its large and small diameters. The aluminum debris protection panels are designed to shield the module from micro-meteoroids.

Also during the spacewalk, the cosmonauts relocated a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna cable. The cosmonauts moved the GPS cable to assist the rendezvous and docking of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle later this year.

On June 6, Yurchikhin and Kotov are set to wear Russian spacesuits again and install 12 additional protection panels on Zvezda. They also will install a section of an Ethernet cable on the Zarya module and a Russian experiment called Biorisk on the Pirs Docking Compartment.

During the second spacewalk, Flight Engineer Suni Williams will remain aboard the station as the spacewalk choreographer, as she did this week, advising and keeping the spacewalkers on schedule.

Additionally this week, Williams packed science payload and personal items she will bring with her when she returns to Earth at the end of the upcoming STS-117 shuttle mission, scheduled for launch Friday, June 8 at 7:38 p.m. EDT.

Williams collected her fifth and final set of blood and urine samples for the Nutritional Status Assessment, which measures physiological changes in the human body during spaceflight. The samples are stored at minus 80 degrees Celsius in the Minus-Eighty Laboratory Freezer. The experiment will help researchers understand bone metabolism, oxidative damage, vitamin and mineral status and hormonal changes and how they relate to stress, bone and muscle metabolism. The results should provide a better understanding of what happens physiologically, and when it happens, to crew members on long-duration space missions.

Science activities on the International Space Station are coordinated by NASA payload teams at Johnson Space Center, Houston, and Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala. Marshall is the home of the Payload Operations Center linked to Mission Control in Houston.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

- end -
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-30

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#72    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 10:01 PM

June 6, 2007
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-3749

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-31

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-31


HOUSTON - On Wednesday, the Expedition 15 crew completed the second spacewalk in eight days and continued preparations for space shuttle Atlantis' arrival at the International Space Station.

Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov opened the hatch on the Pirs docking compartment at 9:23 a.m. CDT to begin a spacewalk lasting 5 hours and 37 minutes. The cosmonauts installed sample containers on the Pirs module for a Russian experiment. The experiment, called Biorisk, looks at the effect of space on microorganisms.

Next, the spacewalkers strung a section of Ethernet cable on the exterior of the Zarya module. This completed the installation of a remote computer network that will enable commanding of the station's Russian segment from the U.S. segment, if necessary.

Yurchikhin and Kotov later moved to the primary task on the agenda, putting up 12 debris shield panels on the conical section of the Zvezda module. Five panels were installed last week, and six others were installed in 2002 to improve the module's protection from micrometeroid debris strikes. The aluminum panels each measure approximately 2 feet by 3 feet and are 1 inch thick.

Almost two and a half hours into the spacewalk, Russian controllers noticed unusual readings in Pirs and asked Yurchikhin to return to the module where he verified that the pressurized oxygen bottles were closed properly. Mission Control Moscow subsequently determined that a small amount of oxygen was flowing from a fluid umbilical that had not closed fully when it was disconnected from the spacesuit at the beginning of the spacewalk. Controllers closed the flow of oxygen to that umbilical to preserve the supply and restarted it during repressurization of Pirs after the spacewalk concluded.

The spacewalk ended at 3 p.m. when the hatch on Pirs was closed. Both cosmonauts now have 11 hours and 2 minutes experience in the Russian Orlan spacesuits. This was the 83rd spacewalk in support of station assembly and maintenance, the 55th conducted from the station, and the 22nd conducted out of Pirs.

During Wednesday's spacewalk, Flight Engineer Suni Williams remained aboard the station monitoring the spacewalk, exercising and conducting experiment activities. Earlier this week, she and her crewmates prepared the Quest airlock for the spacewalks planned during Atlantis' mission. They also packed her personal items and experiment results for her return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Early in the morning of June 16, Williams will exceed astronaut Shannon Lucid's mark for the longest spaceflight ever by a woman, 188 days and 4 hours.

Commander Rick Sturckow and the crew of shuttle Atlantis are in Florida preparing for their scheduled launch Friday, June 8, at 7:38 p.m. EDT. STS-117, due to dock to the station at 2:49 p.m. CDT Sunday, June 10, delivers a new set of solar array wings and a new station flight engineer, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

- end -
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-31

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#73    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 09:33 PM

June 29, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-32

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-32


HOUSTON -- After the departure of the space shuttle Atlantis, Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov returned to their daily operations aboard the International Space Station this week, while newly arrived Flight Engineer Clay Anderson began conducting scientific experiments.

Atlantis landed in California June 22 after delivering a new starboard truss segment and a set of solar arrays to the station. Returning on the shuttle was Sunita Williams, who lived and worked aboard the orbiting complex for six months. Anderson succeeded Williams on the station and arrived with the Atlantis crew on June 10.

Anderson performed his first Saturday Science activity on June 23, showing younger television viewers how Newton's laws apply to sports activities, even in the microgravity of space.

On Monday, Anderson began work with a nutrition experiment. He collected blood and urine samples and began logging all of the food and drinks he consumed. The experiment tracks many vitamins and minerals essential for good health. It is the most comprehensive in-flight study to date of human physiological changes during long-duration spaceflight. Also, Anderson and Kotov did a medical emergency exercise, and Yurchikhin replaced one of three transmitters on the Russian Regul communications system.

The crew inspected the lights and power systems and performed a routine examination of the windows on the Russian Zvezda service module on Tuesday.

Wednesday was filled with science. Each crew member completed medical tests and periodic fitness evaluations, and worked with a variety of Russian experiments. Kotov spent about two hours using a multimeter to do resistance checks on the computer system in the Zvezda service module. The two major computer systems there continue to function well, with two of three "lanes," or data paths, of each system operating.

Anderson wore an acoustic dosimeter on Thursday to check station noise levels. He also worked with the Microgravity Science Glovebox in an unsuccessful effort to complete a leak check. Troubleshooting continues. Yurchikhin and Kotov spent more than two hours with the Russian Profilaktika experiment, which looks at measures to counteract the long-term effects of microgravity. Yurchikhin also worked with the Matryoshka radiation detection experiment and Kotov inventoried medical equipment inventory.

On Friday, Anderson did a routine cleaning of spacesuit cooling loops. Yurchikhin and Kotov worked in the Russian segment, replacing current converter units in the Zarya module.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

- end -
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-32

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#74    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 10:06 PM

July 6, 2007
John Yembrick
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0602

John Ira Petty
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS07-33

International Space Station Status Report: SS07-33


HOUSTON - Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Clay Anderson this week finished preparing their spacesuits for a planned July 23 spacewalk. Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov also continued evaluating the computers on the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

During the U.S. spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Anderson will jettison a support post for an exterior video camera and a 1,400-pound, refrigerator-sized tank that is no longer needed. The tank, known as the Early Ammonia Servicer, was designed to replenish ammonia to the temporary cooling system on the station in the event of a coolant leak.

The spacewalkers also will replace a faulty Remote Power Control Module to restore backup power to the station's Mobile Transporter railcar, which is needed for the space shuttle STS-118 mission. Other tasks include cleaning the Unity node's nadir Common Berthing Mechanism seals for the relocation of Pressurized Mating Adapter-3. PMA-3 must be moved before the station's Harmony node arrives on shuttle mission STS-120, which is targeted for late October.

Yurchikhin and Kotov worked on the Russian computers during the past week, visually inspecting and photographing cables and connectors on the command processing unit. Although there is no conclusive evidence of what caused the problems during shuttle Atlantis' visit last month, the inspections did yield some valuable information. The voltage readings on cables and connectors for the secondary power system appeared normal with the exception of one relay. Also, some corrosion was found on a second connector and a third was discolored. Troubleshooting continues.

In addition, the crew and flight controllers completed software upgrades this week for computers on the U.S. and Russian segments. The upgrades to the U.S. computers will allow the addition of the Harmony node, the European Space Agency's Columbus module and the Japanese Kibo Experiment Module during upcoming shuttle flights.

Plans are proceeding for the launch of the next Russian cargo ship, the ISS Progress 26, which will deliver to the station new computers, equipment, food, fuel, water and other supplies. Launch is scheduled for Aug. 2, with docking planned on Aug. 5.

Also this week, Anderson discussed the progress of his mission and life aboard the station during an educational in-flight event with students at the Clay Center for Arts and Sciences in Charleston, W.Va.

For more about the crew's activities and station sighting opportunities, visit:

- end -
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA - ISS Status 07-33

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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