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Dinosaur of the Day


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#151    angrycrustacean

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Posted 19 July 2006 - 11:39 PM

Frogfish, I've noticed you're hotlinking most if not all of your more recent pictures in this thread. Surely you know the many reasons why hotlinking is frowned upon.

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#152    __Kratos__

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Posted 19 July 2006 - 11:45 PM

Tarchia
Tarchia gigantea
  
user posted image

Pronounced: Tar-chee-uh
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Brainy"
Length: 28 Feet (8.5 m)
Height: 10 Feet (3m)
Weight: 5 Tons (4,500 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 70 MYA

Tarchia was a large, armored dinosaur that lived in Asia. This plant-eater seems to have been a common dinosaur and quite was similar to Ankylosaurus. It was another member of the family of dinosaurs that were built low to the ground with thick, bony scutes covering much of their back and neck. It also had a fearsome weapon to protect itself, a heavy, bony club on the end of its tail that when swung could have broken the bones of any animal that tried to attack it.

Tarchia seemed to have a larger brain than other members of its family do, and its skull seems to support the theory that ankylosaur heads became more massive as they evolved.

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#153    frogfish

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 12:48 PM

Nanotyrannus
Nanotyrannus lancensis
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: NAN-oh-tie-RAN-us
Diet: Carnivore (Meat eater)
Name Means: Tiny tyrant
Length: 17 feet (5 m)
Height: 7 feet (2 m)
Weight: 1 ton (900 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 70 MYA  
Location: Western U.S.  

  Nanotyrannus is known from a single skull and jaw. The skull was originally thought to be that of an Albertosaurus, but significant differences were noticed years after it had been prepared and stored on a museum shelf. The skull was re-prepared, studied and re-described by Dr. Robert Bakker. Nanotyrannus had the honor of being the first dinosaur to be CAT scanned.

Nanotyrannus had forward-facing eyes like T. rex, which gave it very good depth perception. It had sharp, serrated teeth and powerful neck muscles. Combined, these tools would have made it an excellent hunter.

Some paleontologists believe that Nanotyrannus is a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex, partly because some of the skull bones are not fused, indicating an immature animal. A few paleontologists have suggested it may be a type of huge dromaeosaur (raptor).

------------

The controversial dinosaur Jane...Nanotyrannus or Juvenile T-rex?

Source

Edited by Lottie, 21 July 2006 - 01:06 PM.

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#154    frogfish

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 12:46 AM

Camptosaurus
Camptosaurus dispar
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: Camp-toe-Sore-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Flexible Lizard"
Length: 22 feet (7 m)
Height: 7 feet (2 m)
Weight: 1 ton (900 kilos)
Time: Jurassic to Cretaceous - 152-140 MYA  
Location: Western North America, England  
  
  First discovered in 1877, there have been more than 20 skulls and 12 skeletons found to date of this dinosaur. This leads scientists to think of it as a fairly common plant eater of the last part of the Jurassic and the first part of the Cretaceous. It belongs to the same family as Iguanodon, although it was an earlier dinosaur.

There is ongoing debate regarding the various specimens currently attributed to the genus Camptosaurus. Some scientists believe that a number of the species should be renamed after the type specimen and that their differences are simply individual variation. There have been a number of dinosaurs that were originally classified as Camptosaurus, including an Allosaurus species.



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#155    frogfish

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 06:03 PM

Paranthodon
Paranthodon africanum
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: par-An-tho-don
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Similar to Anthodon"
Length: 17 feet (5 m)
Height: 6 feet (2 m)
Weight: 1 ton (900 kilos)
Time: Late Jurassic - 148 MYA  
Location: Africa  
  
  Paranthodon was a close relative of Stegosaurus and lived in the southern part of Africa at the end of the Jurassic period. The stegosaurs were a family of plant-eaters with small heads and a row of either plates or spines running along their back from their neck to the end of their tail.

Paranthodon was initially classified in 1929 as a non-dinosaur due to the lack of material - only a partial jaw with teeth were found. It was given its present name in 1978, but classified as an ankylosaur. In 1979 a number of similarities with Stegosaurus were noted and it was given its current membership in the stegosauria.



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#156    frogfish

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 12:48 AM

Beipiaosaurus
Beipiaosaurus inexpectus
  
user posted image  

Pronounced: Bay-pee-o-Sore-us
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Beipiao lizard"
Length: 7 feet (2.2 m)
Height: 4 feet (1.3 m)
Weight: 100 pounds (45 kilos)
Time: Early Cretaceous - 130 MYA    
Location: Asia  

  Beipiaosaurus had the longest feathers of any dinosaur yet found. Classified as a meat-eater, it is thought that these dinosaurs would also have fed on insects a great deal of the time. It is considered a bird-like dinosaur and shared a number of features that are now found on modern birds.

Described in 1999, Beipiaosaurus is one of a few known bird-like dinosaurs. It came from the famous shale quarries of Liaoning, China, which are well known for producing many incredibly detailed fossils of small dinosaurs and birds. Most of the bird/dinosaur relationship studies are conducted on specimens from this quarry, as unique ecological conditions preserved even the soft parts of the animals that died at this site. These unusual conditions allowed for the perfect preservation of feathers.

Beipiaosaurus remains are fragmentary, but they do show that it was bipedal like other therizinosaurs and that it had sharp, curved hand claws and protofeathers .



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#157    frogfish

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 10:12 PM

Titanosaurus
Titanosaurus indicus
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: tie-Tan-o-Sore-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Titan Lizard"
Length: 50 feet (15 m)
Height: 16 feet (5 m)
Weight: 10 tons (9,500 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 70 MYA    
Location: India  
  
  Titanosaurus was among the last of the giant sauropods to walk the Earth. This was a giant plant-eater from the same family as Argentinosaurus. It was probably related to dinosaurs that traveled from South America when it was still connected to Africa. The entire family of these Cretaceous giants is named after this dinosaur, even though only a few bones of Titanosaurus have ever been found.

Titanosaurus was a heavily built sauropod, as is typical for this family. Although some members of this family had scutes, it isn't known if any were present on this animal. A number of species exist for this genus and several genera are attributed to the titanosauria.



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#158    drakonwick

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 03:35 AM

Ultrosaurus
Conservation status: Fossil

An artist's impression of Ultrasaurus.
[attachmentid=27061]Ultrasaurus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Sauropsida

Superorder: Dinosauria

Order: Saurischia

Infraorder: Sauropoda

Genus: ?Ultrasaurus


Species
?U. tabriensis


This article is about Ultrasaurus, a dubious dinosaur from South Korea. The article on the invalid giant dinosaur from Utah, in the United States, is at Ultrasauros. For the fictional Zoid based on this dinosaur, see Ultrasaurus (Zoids).
Ultrasaurus is the official name of a dinosaur discovered by Haang Mook Kim in South Korea, but the name was first used in 1979 by Jim Jensen to describe a set of giant dinosaur bones he discovered in the United States.

[edit]
Mistaken assessments
The bones discovered by Jim Jensen, of Brigham Young University, at the Dry Mesa Quarry, Utah were originally believed to belong to the largest dinosaur ever, so the name was widely used by the press and in scientific literature.

Haang Mook Kim published a paper in 1983, describing a new dinosaur which he named Ultrasaurus tabriensis, because he believed it was an equally giant relative of Jensen's dinosaur. However, Kim's assessment was incorrect. His dinosaur was much smaller than he believed, because he mistook a leg bone (femur) for an arm bone (humerus). However, since Kim was the first to publish the name Ultrasaurus, the name officially applies to the South Korean dinosaur.

Jensen published a paper describing his discovery in 1985, but since the name Ultrasaurus was already in use (preoccupied), his discovery was renamed in 1991 to Ultrasauros. However, Jensen also made a mistake. His discovery was a chimera; the fossils belonged to two different dinosaurs, both of which already had names. So his new name, Ultrasauros, is now just an alternate name (junior synonym) for the dinosaur officially known as Supersaurus.

Kim's Ultrasaurus is currently nomen dubium, which means not enough is known about the specimen to formally assign it to a specific family of sauropods. It may even be a member of a known genus or species, which would make the name Ultrasaurus a junior synonym as well.

Description
Kim's Ultrasaurus lived 100 to 110 million years ago, during the Aptian and Albian ages of the early Cretaceous. It is known from part of an upper forearm (humerus), and some back bones (vertebrae).


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Edited by Moro Bumbleroot, 28 July 2006 - 03:36 AM.

I remember the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another." - J. Robert Oppenheimer.

#159    The Carnivore

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 06:52 AM

Quote


So many theropods.... hey, why is there no elasmosaurus, or a sarchosuchus, oh, and some mammals! A thread on Pleistocene mammals would be awesome!

I do indeed like this thread, though. yes.gif

Because they arent dinosaurs, and ths thread is about dinosaurs thumbsup.gif
Anyways, here's a nice, chewy link because i cant post pics.
http://www.batsquatch.com/webimages/batsquatch01.jpg
oops, wrong link

Edited by sadistic jellyfish of doom, 17 August 2006 - 06:53 AM.

ಠ_ಠ

#160    frogfish

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 05:32 PM

Shuvuuia
Shuvuuia deserti
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: shoe-View-ee-uh
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Desert Bird"
Length: 3 Feet (1m)
Height: 1.5 Feet (.5m)
Weight: 12 Pounds (5 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 75 MYA
Location: Mongolia  

  Shuvuuia was a small dinosaur that a lot in common with modern birds, including its jaw and feathers. While Shuvuuia appears to have been capable of bursts of speedy movement, scientists think that it spent most of its time searching for small, hidden or burrowing prey, such as nesting insects.

It is noteworthy that Shuvuuia is the only Alvarezsaurid that is known from a complete skull. Some fossil material previously thought to have been Mononykus have been assigned to Shuvuuia. These bird-like dinosaur fossils have created one of the most intense fields of study within paleontology and have contributed to many new theories.



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#161    frogfish

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 04:39 PM

Chasmosaurus
Chasmosaurus belli
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: KAZ-moe-sawr-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "chasm lizard"
Length: 16 Feet (5 m)
Height: 10 Feet (3 m)
Weight: 3 tons (2700 kilos)
Time: Cretaceous - 75 MYA  
Location: Alberta Canada, Texas United States  
  
  Chasmosaurus was the oldest of the long-frilled, horned ceratopsian dinosaurs, whose family includes Triceratops. It was a medium-sized plant eater that had a long neck frill with large holes in the bone and narrow structures to support the weight of the frill. It would have had skin stretched over the holes in its frill. Chasmosaurus had medium-sized horns over its eyes, and a smaller nose horn.

Judging from the monotypic bone beds of the Chasmosaurus fossils, this animal traveled in single species herds. Since the frill of a Chasmosaurus would not be a very effective defensive weapon, there is speculation that it may have been used for identification and attracting mates. New discoveries suggest the possibility that Chasmosaurus and Pentaceratops might belong in the same genus.



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#162    frogfish

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 05:09 PM

Lesothosaurus
Lesothosaurus diagnosticus
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: leh-So-tho-Saw-rus
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "diagnostic Lesotho lizard"
Length: 3 feet (1 m)
Height: 1 foot (.3 m)
Weight: 15 pounds (7 kilos)
Time: Triassic  
Location: Southern Africa/possibly Australia  

  Lesothosaurus is a very early herbivorous (plant-eating) dinosaur. It was very small compared to the later giant plant-eaters. Not a lot is known about this small dinosaur. Lesothosaurus, being such an early dinosaur, shared the way it looked with early meat-eaters. It was still small enough and light enough that it could walk mostly on its hind legs. It was a small, speedy creature that would eat low-growing plants.

Lesothosaurus is known from some skull and skeleton fragments. It is interesting as a specimen because it developed at the very beginning of the Jurassic period. Fragmentary fossils of a dinosaur that was initially identified as Fabrosaurus are thought to possibly be those of the Lesothosaurus. This material was found in Australia (which was connected to South Africa in the late Triassic) and current thinking is that it is likely the same dinosaur.



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#163    frogfish

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 12:26 AM

Polacanthus
Polacanthus foxii
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: Poe-laa-Kan-thus
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Many Spine"
Length: 13 Feet (4m)
Height: 5 Feet (1.7 m)
Weight: 1 Ton (900 kilos)
Time: Early Cretaceous - 140 MYA
Location: England  
  
  A few fossil remains of Polacanthus, an armored dinosaur, were among the first dinosaurs ever discovered. In fact, it was Sir Richard Owen, the man who coined the word Dinosaur, who described Polacanthus in 1865. This plant-eater had a large solid plate of bone over its hips. When it was first discovered, it was thought to be the shell of some prehistoric turtle.

An early member of the ankylosaur family, Polacanthus is believed to be descended from Hylaeosaurus. Its spikes and dermal plates are not as pronounced as some later ankylosaurs, and it is speculated that it has a somewhat smaller head and no club on its tail. The fossil remains are still sparse and much of what has been written about this dinosaur is speculation.



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#164    frogfish

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 10:45 PM

Argentinosaurus
Argentinosaurus huenculensis
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: Are-jen-Tee-no-Sore-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Argentina Lizard"
Length: 115 to 150 feet (35m to 45 m)?
Height: 50 feet (16 m)?
Weight: 80 tons (72,500 kilos)?
Time: Middle Cretaceous - 110 MYA
Location: South America  
  
  Argentinosaurus may have been the biggest dinosaur ever. Like some of the other really huge dinosaurs, such as Ultrasauros , very little of Argentinosaurus has been found, so it is hard to tell exactly what it may have looked like. The only thing that is certain is that it was a huge, long-necked plant eater.

Argentinosaurus was discovered by a retired oil worker and was formally described in 1993. The few bones include hipbones, backbones, and a tibia (lower leg bone). One vertebra was over four feet (1.3 m) tall and the tibia was 58 inches (155 cm) long. A number of prominent scientists have stated that this member of the South American titanosaur family was the largest dinosaur that ever lived.



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#165    frogfish

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 01:24 AM

Carcharodontosaurus
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: car-Car-o-Don-to-Sor-us
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Shark Tooth Lizard"
Length: 46 feet (14 m)
Height: 17 feet (5 m)
Weight: 8 tons (7,200 kilos)
Time: Mid Cretaceous - 100 MYA    
Location: Africa  

  Carcharodontosaurus may have been the largest meat-eating dinosaur to ever walk the Earth. This huge predator lived in Africa during much of the Cretaceous period. Originally discovered in the 1920's, it wasn't until the 1990's that scientists found enough of this dinosaur to figure out what it looked like and how big it actually grew.

Classification of Carcharodontosaurus, as well as other genera seemingly related to this dinosaur, is still being studied. Whether or not this genus belongs in the allosaur family is the subject of much discussion. Some scientists also believe this genus may be the same as Giganotosaurus



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