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Dinosaur of the Day


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#91    frogfish

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 07:03 PM

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its a pity you have to look all this stuff up before you post it

You can keep your rude remarks to yourself.

Quote

having real knowledge on the subject would be quite an accomplishment

What a accomplishment I have made clap.gif

Like psyche said, I do have an extensive knowledge on this subject.

Edited by frogfish, 31 May 2006 - 07:04 PM.

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#92    frogfish

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 07:06 PM

Ornitholestes
Ornitholestes hermanni
  
user posted image
  
Pronounced: Or-ni-thoe-les-tes
Diet: Carnivore (meat-eater)
Name Means: "Bird Robber"
Length: 6 feet (2 m)
Height: 1 foot (.3 m)
Weight: 25 pounds (11 kilos)
Time: Late Jurassic - 145 MYA    
Location: Western U.S, possibly Asia  

  Ornitholestes was a smaller dinosaur that we know very little about. Only one skeleton has ever been found and it is missing a few parts. It got its name kind of by accident because the scientist who found it put the wrong hands on it at first (it was found mixed in with other dinosaur bones). He thought the hands could catch birds, so he called it a Bird Robber.

The skull of this dinosaur was crushed flat when it was discovered and some of the bone near the tip is missing. A few of the scientists who have studied the specimen believe that it may have had a small, flat horn on the end of its snout. But as this can't be determined for certain without another specimen, that is just a guess.
  
    


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#93    Raptor

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 12:59 AM

Quote


its a pity you have to look all this stuff up before you post it... having real knowledge on the subject would be quite an accomplishment.


If you don't like the thread, don't come here. As others have said, Frogfish does indeed have extensive knowledge on this subject, it's a pity you didn't think before typing that reply. Valuable bandwidth was wasted.  ohmy.gif
- - - - - -
Now, back to the topic. One of my favourites of the triassic.

user posted image

Name: Postosuchus
Pronunciation: POEST-oh-SOOK-uss
Meaning: Post crocodile
Animal Type:Archosaur
Dietary Type: Carnivore - (herbivore eating cannibal)
Size: Up to 6 metres long, able to rear up 2 metres tall
Weight: Just under a tonne
Major Fossil Finds: Petrified Forest in Arizona, USA

Evidence
There have been several finds in the Petrified Forest in Arizona, and Post Quarry in Texas. Postosuchus was an archosaur ("ruling reptile"), a major group of living and extinct reptiles that includes crocodiles, dinosaurs, pterosaurs and birds. Postosuchus was on the line to crocodiles, but it was not a crocodile itself.

Postosuchus evolved in the Late Triassic period. It was the top carnivore of the age. Its skull was short and broad, but it had a narrow snout and deep powerful jaws. Heavy-duty armour consisting of rows of plates covered its long back.

It had a unique upright stance with straight legs directly beneath its body suggesting a quick and efficient runner. It is sometimes called a "running crocodile". It had longer back legs than front legs. Some palaeontologists believe it ran on two legs, but the majority think that it did so on four.

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#94    frogfish

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 02:56 AM

Euoplocephalus
Euoplocephalus tutus
  
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Pronounced: u-Opp-low-Seff-uh-luss
Diet: Herbivore (plant-eater)
Name Means: "Well-Armored Head"
Length: 20 ft. (6.5 m)
Height: 8 ft. (2.7 m)
Weight: 2 tons
Time: Late Cretaceous - 76 MYA  
Location: N. America  
  
  Euoplocephalus is the best known of all the armored dinosaurs, which includes Ankylosaurus. This plant-eater was typical of this family of dinosaurs having a low, fat body with a tail ending in a heavy, bony club. It would have wandered in herds throughout the western part of the United States near the end of the age of dinosaurs, munching on low growing plants.

Euoplocephalus was not as heavily armored as some of its family members, but its long tail and heavy club would have made a formidable defensive weapon. The club would have weighed close to 50 pounds (20 kilos) and on the end of a tail that was nearly 7 feet (2 m) long, it would have easily crushed the bones of a large predator.
----------------
always one of my favs to draw...


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#95    frogfish

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 03:58 PM

Brontosaurus
Brontosaurus excelsus

user posted image  
  
Pronounced: Bron-toe-Sore-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Thunder Lizard"
Length: 76 feet (23 m)
Height: 25 feet (8 m)
Weight: 33 tons (30,000 kilos)
Time: Late Jurassic - 155 MYA  
Location: SW United States  

  Brontosaurus is one of the most well known dinosaurs, but did it really exist? At this point, scientists can't agree on whether Brontosaurus actually existed, as the original type specimen was actually a combination of two different dinosaurs - an Apatosaurus body and a Camarasaurus head. Currently, Brontosaurus is not a valid species, but that may change.

When it was discovered that the head of Camarasaurus was placed on the body of Apatosaurus and called Brontosaurus, most people thought that was the end of this dinosaur that had become an icon for dinosaur fans from the late 19th century through the 1970s. That may not be the case, however, as Dr. Robert Bakker is developing evidence that supports his claim that Brontosaurus should still be recognized as a real dinosaur. He asserts that it was a huge, long-necked plant eater that deserved its name, which means Thunder Lizard.
  
    
---------

Old school dinosaur...

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#96    mypaddedroom

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 06:31 PM

Just had to post love this thread. Never payed much attention to it, but I just passed through to check it out I like the effort and time people are putting to post facts about the random Dinosaurs.
Nice Topic


#97    frogfish

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 06:14 PM

Deinonychus
Deinonychus antirrhopus
  
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Pronounced: die-Non-ih-kiss
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Terrible Claw"
Length: 10 feet (3 m)
Height: 4 feet (1.2 m)
Weight: 110 pounds (50 kilos)
Time: Early to Mid Cretaceous - 120 MYA  
Location: Western North America  

  Deinonychus was a fast and vicious hunter. Its name means "terrible claw," and it was given this name because of the large, retractable hunting claw on each of its feet. Like its cousin, the Velociraptor, it used this claw to tear into the flesh of the dinosaurs it hunted. The claw would snap forward and make a large, deep wound when it attacked. Deinonychus was about twice as big as Velociraptor.

Deinonychus is probably the best known of the dromeasaurids, with nine specimens having been discovered since the genus was established in 1962 by John Ostrum. An interesting feature about this dinosaur is that its teeth are more backward pointing than other, larger theropods, suggesting that they are designed for feeding and not for the killing of prey. This points to the effectiveness of its hand and foot claws as weapons. Its skeletal design, according to Ostrum, clearly points to a very active predatory lifestyle - a hunter with both speed and agility. Its hands were very large and had a great range of movement and flexibility. As the dinosaur grew, long tendons along its tail hardened into a bone-like material to stiffen it and make it a useful mechanism for maintaining balance and direction in quick turns. A few scientists have argued that Deinonychus is a North American species of Velociraptor and does not merit its own genus.

In his 1986 book The Dinosaur Heresies, Dr. Robert Bakker puts forth the view that Deinonychus has many features found in birds and might be considered either a bird-like dinosaur or a dinosaur-like bird. Recent research and discoveries by scientists such as Dr. Philip Currie are showing that some dinosaurs similar to Deinonychus most likely had feather-like coverings on all or part of their bodies. These proto-feathers were most likely used for insulation, display, or both, and may eventually have evolved into flight feathers. To date, these have not been found on Deinonychus.



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#98    angrycrustacean

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 02:06 AM

Quote


You can keep your rude remarks to yourself.
What a accomplishment I have made clap.gif

Like psyche said, I do have an extensive knowledge on this subject.


Love the thread, and I hope it continues, but don't you think you should mention that the fact files you're posting are from here? Not trying to antagonize, just a thought. I know you linked in the first post, but it seems the confusion with Rambo might have been avoided if you put the link in each post.

Keep up the good work. thumbsup.gif

Edited by angrycrustacean, 05 June 2006 - 02:08 AM.

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#99    frogfish

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 12:15 AM

Quote

I know you linked in the first post,

Its there if anyone wonders thumbsup.gif

Stygimoloch
Stygimoloch spinifer
  
user posted image
  
Pronounced: Stig-ee-Moe-lok
Diet: Omnivore ( Meat & Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Styx Moloch" (mythology)
Length: 10 feet (3 m)
Height: 5 feet (1.8 m)
Weight: 440 pounds (200 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 70 MYA    
Location: Western U.S  

  A member of the same family that includes the better-known Pachycephalosaurus , this dinosaur was smaller and had a skull that wasn't quite as thick. In 1995, fossil hunter Mike Triebold found a complete skeleton of this fascinating dinosaur. This was a remarkable find as before his discovery, no member of the pachycephalosaur family had been discovered with both the head and body together. His find showed that this dinosaur could never have butted heads like many had thought. If it did, it would probably have broken its neck!

The ring of horns that encircled its thick skull was probably used for display and it may have been used as a club for hitting others of its own kind during courtship. It is not likely that it could have been used as a serious weapon.

Stygimoloch is an interesting dinosaur for a number of reasons. Although it lived in the late Cretaceous, it had a number of primitive characteristics. It had five fingers, it had teeth similar to Stegosaurus in the back of its mouth, but the front was filled with sharp incisors similar to a carnivore.

Stygimoloch was originally discovered in the late 1800s, but almost 100 years would pass from the discovery of the first fossil elements to the discovery of the definitive specimen by Triebold in 1995. In between, all of the remains that had been found were misidentified as those from a Pachycephalosaurus. In fact, even Triebold's specimen was initially misidentified as Pachycephalosaurus.



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#100    frogfish

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 02:55 PM

Caudipteryx
Caudipteryx zoui
  
user posted image
  
Pronounced: cow-DIP-tuh-riks
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: Zou's tail feathers
Length: 3 feet (1 m)
Height: 2 feet (less than 1 m)
Weight: 15 pounds (6 - 7 kilos)
Time: Early Cretaceous - 140 MYA  
Location: Liaoning Province, China  

  Caudipteryx is one of several types of feathered dinosaurs recently discovered in China. These new finds have caused one of the greatest controversies in modern paleontology. They have many of the characteristics that were expected in a "missing link" between dinosaurs and birds, but they lived millions of years after Archaeopteryx, the first known bird ancestor.

Caudipteryx was a turkey-sized dinosaur that had feathers, but was unable to fly. It had short forelimbs, large eyes and long, sharp, spiked teeth. Quick and agile, it had long slender legs. The most prominent feature of Caudipteryx had to be its tail, which was covered with 6-inch-long tail feathers. The feather fossils show bands of dark and light that may have been color, giving us an idea of how Caudipteryx looked.

Some of the evolutionary advantages feathers may have provided to a flightless animal may include the ability to control body heat, some protection from teeth and claws, camouflage and identification. Since Caudipteryx lived in a wetland area, it is easy to imagine it wading into shallow water on its long legs to spear small fish and amphibians with its long sharp teeth. All known remains of Caudipteryx have been found with gastroliths, or "gizzard stones" about an inch in size. This indicates Caudipteryx did not chew its food, probably swallowing small prey whole.

Did Archaeopteryx and Caudipteryx descend from a common ancestor? Or was Caudipteryx a dinosaur sharing a convergent evolution with birds. This will be a long and lively debate.



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#101    frogfish

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 07:39 PM

Albertosaurus
Albertosaurus sacrophagus
  
user posted image
  
Pronounced: al-Bert-o-Saw-rus
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Alberta Lizard"
Length: 28 feet (8.5 m)
Height: 10 feet (3 m)
Weight: 2.5 tons (2300 kilos)
Time: Late Cretaceous - 70 MYA
Location: Northern North America  

  Albertosaurus was the grandfather of T. rex. This dinosaur looked like a smaller, less muscular version of Tyrannosaurus. As an early member of the tyrannosaur family, Albertosaurus was the final design for the large meat-eating dinosaurs. It only had two fingers on its hands, which were at the end of short arms. It had long legs and it a wide skull with lots of power in its bite.

Albertosaurus is considered by many scientists to be the best known of the tyrannosaurs. A number of nearly complete skeletons, two adults and a juvenile, have been found. There are two recognized species and several in dispute. It is sometimes referenced as a transitory animal, a creature on its way to evolving into T. rex, but it appears that it was extremely successful and longer lived than the Tyrannosaurus genus.
  
    


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#102    Master Sage

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 06:29 PM

Quote


If you don't like the thread, don't come here. As others have said, Frogfish does indeed have extensive knowledge on this subject, it's a pity you didn't think before typing that reply. Valuable bandwidth was wasted.  ohmy.gif
- - - - - -
Now, back to the topic. One of my favourites of the triassic.

user posted image

Name: Postosuchus
Pronunciation: POEST-oh-SOOK-uss
Meaning: Post crocodile
Animal Type:Archosaur
Dietary Type: Carnivore - (herbivore eating cannibal)
Size: Up to 6 metres long, able to rear up 2 metres tall
Weight: Just under a tonne
Major Fossil Finds: Petrified Forest in Arizona, USA

Evidence
There have been several finds in the Petrified Forest in Arizona, and Post Quarry in Texas. Postosuchus was an archosaur ("ruling reptile"), a major group of living and extinct reptiles that includes crocodiles, dinosaurs, pterosaurs and birds. Postosuchus was on the line to crocodiles, but it was not a crocodile itself.

Postosuchus evolved in the Late Triassic period. It was the top carnivore of the age. Its skull was short and broad, but it had a narrow snout and deep powerful jaws. Heavy-duty armour consisting of rows of plates covered its long back.

It had a unique upright stance with straight legs directly beneath its body suggesting a quick and efficient runner. It is sometimes called a "running crocodile". It had longer back legs than front legs. Some palaeontologists believe it ran on two legs, but the majority think that it did so on four.

Link


Cool picture

Quote


Brontosaurus
Brontosaurus excelsus

user posted image  
  
Pronounced: Bron-toe-Sore-us
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Thunder Lizard"
Length: 76 feet (23 m)
Height: 25 feet (8 m)
Weight: 33 tons (30,000 kilos)
Time: Late Jurassic - 155 MYA  
Location: SW United States  

  Brontosaurus is one of the most well known dinosaurs, but did it really exist? At this point, scientists can't agree on whether Brontosaurus actually existed, as the original type specimen was actually a combination of two different dinosaurs - an Apatosaurus body and a Camarasaurus head. Currently, Brontosaurus is not a valid species, but that may change.

When it was discovered that the head of Camarasaurus was placed on the body of Apatosaurus and called Brontosaurus, most people thought that was the end of this dinosaur that had become an icon for dinosaur fans from the late 19th century through the 1970s. That may not be the case, however, as Dr. Robert Bakker is developing evidence that supports his claim that Brontosaurus should still be recognized as a real dinosaur. He asserts that it was a huge, long-necked plant eater that deserved its name, which means Thunder Lizard.
  
    
---------

Old school dinosaur...


Very, and I belive tey solved the debate, its firmly no. I think.


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#103    frogfish

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 03:52 PM

Suchomimus
Suchomimus tenerensis
  
user posted image
  
Pronounced: Sue-koe-My-mus
Diet: Carnivore (Meat-Eater)
Name Means: "Crocodile Mimic"
Length: 40 feet (13 m)
Height: 16 feet (5 m)
Weight: 6 tons (6,000 kilos)
Time: Middle Cretaceous - 100 MYA    
Location: North Africa  

  Suchomimus was very similar to Spinosaurus, but it didn't have the tall sail on its back. Along with its cousin, Suchomimus ate mostly fish, which it caught with its long, thin snout full of sharp, cone-shaped teeth. It was discovered in 1998 and has given scientists a much clearer picture of what this fish-eating family of dinosaurs, which also includes Baryonyx was like.

The discovery of Suchomimus has helped both scientists and the general public understand the rich diversity of life that lived in Africa millions of years ago. It has also provided scientist with valuable clues about the migration of the spinosaurs from Europe into Africa. Although it did not have nearly as prominent a sail as Spinosaurus, Suchomimus did have sacral vertebrae that supported a two-foot (.7 m) sail on its back. Some scientists are questioning whether this dinosaur is a unique genus or if it might be a species of Baryonyx.
  
    


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#104    frogfish

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 07:08 PM

Dravidosaurus
Dravidosaurus blandfordi
  user posted image
  
Pronounced: dray-Vid-o-Saw-rus
Diet: Herbivore (Plant-Eater)
Name Means: "Dravidanadu Lizard"
Length: Unknown
Height: Unknown
Weight: Unknown
Time: Early Cretaceous - 140 MYA
Location: India

  Until the discovery of Dravidosaurus, it was thought that all members of the stegosaur family died out before the end of the Jurassic. The discovery of this small plant-eater in India shows that stegosaur family members survived longer than scientists had thought, well into the Cretaceous. Not very much of this dinosaur has been found. However, from what was found, it seems to be much smaller than its more famous relative, Stegosaurus.

Recently, it has been suggested that the fossil remains of Dravidosaurus are not really dinosaurian, but rather that of a plesiosaur. As of this writing, however, the genus is still considered valid.



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#105    frogfish

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 06:25 PM

Pteropelyx
Pteropelyx grallipes
  
  user posted image
Pronounced: tear-o- Pel-ix
Diet: Herbivore(plant-eater)
Name Means: "Wing Pelvis"
Length: unknown
Height: unknown
Weight: unknown
Location: N. America  

  Pteropelyx was discovered in 1888 and named by the famous American fossil hunter E. D. Cope from the Philadelphia Academy of Science. Professor Cope was involved in a fierce rivalry, called the Bone Wars, with Professor Marsh from the Peabody Museum at Yale University to see who could find and name the most dinosaurs. In their rush to name new dinosaurs, they sometimes gave new names to dinosaurs that already had names. This is the case with Pteropelyx. The fossils were of a large duckbill found without a head. Later study showed that Pteropelyx is most likely a Corythosaurus.



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