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Astronauts leaving NASA


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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 02:59 PM

NASA Astronaut Eileen Collins Completes Career of Space Firsts

The user posted image press release is reproduced below:

May 1, 2006
Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
(202) 358-3749

Doug Peterson
Johnson Space Center, Houston
(281) 483-5111

RELEASE: 06-208

NASA Astronaut Eileen Collins Completes Career of Space Firsts


Astronaut Eileen Collins is leaving NASA. Collins was the first woman to command a space shuttle and the leader of Discovery's Return to Flight mission last year. She plans to pursue private interests and spend more time with family.

"Eileen Collins is a living, breathing example of the best that our nation has to offer," said NASA Administrator Michael Griffin. "She is, of course, a brave, superb pilot and a magnificent crew commander. Beyond those qualities, she is both very bright and modestly self-effacing about that fact. And above all, she is possessed of a quiet determination to attain the very highest levels of accomplishment. I am proud to know her and will greatly miss her at NASA."

A veteran of four space flights, Collins' career at NASA has been punctuated by firsts. She was the first woman selected as a pilot astronaut, the first woman to serve as a shuttle pilot and the first woman to command a U.S. spacecraft.

"Eileen is a true pioneer in space and on Earth," said Mike Coats, director of NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. "Her service and dedication to her country, to NASA and to space exploration are an inspiration. She meets every challenge with confidence and an ever-present smile."

Collins was selected as an astronaut in 1990. She served as the pilot on mission STS-63 in February 1995, the first shuttle mission to rendezvous with the Russian Mir Space Station. In May 1997, she flew as pilot on mission STS-84, the sixth shuttle flight to dock to Mir. Collins commanded the Space Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-93 in July 1999, the flight that launched the Chandra X-Ray Observatory.

Her most recent space flight was as commander of July's STS-114 mission, the first shuttle flight since the Columbia accident in 2003. During the 14-day mission, Collins and her six-member crew tested new shuttle safety enhancements and resupplied the International Space Station.

"Eileen is a gifted leader who knows what it takes to get a team through the most difficult of times," said Flight Crew Operations Director Ken Bowersox. "All of us will feel Eileen's absence, but regardless of the path she pursues after leaving NASA, I know she will continue to exert a positive influence on the explorers of today and tomorrow."

For additional biographical information about Collins, visit:

For information about NASA's shuttle program and the next mission, STS-121, visit:

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/home

- end -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA Press Release 06-208

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 01 May 2006 - 03:00 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#2    frogfish

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 11:50 PM

My hat is off to her yes.gif

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#3    Master Sage

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 12:57 AM

I salute her! thumbsup.gif

w00t 2 stars next 2 avitar!

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 03:52 AM

Astronaut Jim Halsell Leaves NASA

The IPB Image Johnson Space Center press release is reproduced below:

11.06.06
Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

RELEASE: J06-100

Astronaut Jim Halsell Leaves NASA

Veteran astronaut Jim Halsell, a retired Air Force colonel, is leaving NASA to take a position in the aerospace industry. Selected by NASA as an astronaut in 1990, Halsell flew on five space shuttle missions, commanding three of them. He accumulated more than 1,250 hours in space.

His first spaceflights were as pilot of STS-65 in July 1994 and STS-74 in November 1995. He commanded shuttle mission STS-83 in April 1997, the Microgravity Science Laboratory Spacelab mission, a mission cut short due to problems with one of the shuttle's three fuel cell power generation units. He next commanded the mission that flew the same payload, STS-94 in July 1997, a science flight that focused on materials and combustion research in microgravity. His final mission was as commander of STS-101 in May 2000, a flight to the International Space Station that delivered and installed more than 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies.

Halsell served as manager of space shuttle launch integration at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., from 2000 to 2002. He also served as the lead of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Planning Team following the Columbia accident. Most recently, he served as the assistant director for aircraft operations in the Flight Crew Operations Directorate at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

“Jim is a tremendously talented person whose contributions and achievements both in space and on the ground have greatly benefited NASA. We’re very sorry to see him leave, but we’re glad that he will continue to contribute to the nation's space program in his new position," said Ellen Ochoa, Director of Flight Crew Operations.

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home


- end -


Source: NASA/JSC Press Release J06-100

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#5    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 03:39 AM

Eileen Collins: An Astronaut's Endless Endeavor

An astronaut’s work, it seems, is never done.

Eileen Collins retired in May, but by October she still hadn’t found time to finish cleaning out her office.

linked-image
Image above: Astronaut Eileen M. Collins.
Image credit: NASA


“I’m still answering mail from 2005,” she said. “I haven’t wound down yet. I’ve been extremely busy.”

Of course, that statement could also apply to the past three decades of Collins’ life. In 1976, when Collins was a college sophomore, the Air Force announced it would begin training women as pilots. NASA followed suit in 1978 and began accepting women into the shuttle program – just about the time Collins was deciding what to do with her life.

“Those were important years for me,” she said. “When the astronaut program opened up to women, that was a huge motivation for me to get my career on the course where I could become a shuttle astronaut someday. And because I was so interested in flying, I wanted to be a shuttle pilot.”

Not that it necessarily would have stopped her if the agencies hadn’t started accepting women. Collins started planning to become an astronaut long before she would technically have been allowed to. In fourth grade she read a Junior Scholastic Magazine article on the pros and cons of spending money on the space program. Even at the tender age of 8, she couldn’t imagine how anyone could think there were cons.

linked-image
Image above: Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander, waves
while floating in the Zvezda Service Module of the International
Space Station.
Image credit: NASA


“I read both pro and con, and it made sense to me that our country should invest in space,” she said. “I couldn’t understand why anyone wouldn’t feel that way.”

That’s how she caught the space bug. From there, Collins started reading anything she could find on space and airplanes and especially astronauts. And it didn’t faze her that there were no women among them.

“I’m not sure why,” she said. “I’m not going to try to analyze it. I just figured there were only men, but I still wanted to do it. And I didn’t think there’d be any reason that a woman couldn’t do it. Maybe I was thinking that women just hadn’t asked.”

Still, Collins knew her goal was unusual for a woman – at the time most women stayed home and brought up children. There were plenty of women nurses and teachers, but few engineers or military officers. So she decided not to advertise her plan.

“I never told anybody I wanted to be an astronaut or pilot,” she said. “I consciously never talked about it because I knew people would say, ‘You can’t do that.’ And I didn’t want to hear it. I just didn’t want to fight it – it wasn’t worth it. Even when I started my flying lessons – and this would have been when I was between my junior and senior year in college – I didn’t tell my friends. I don’t think I even told my parents.”

Instead she saved up the $1,000 she needed for a pilot’s license, drove down to the airport and asked where they taught people how to fly. A year later she was in the Air Force training to be a pilot. Hers was the first class at Vance Air Force Base to include women, and it became her first “first woman to …” experience. She compared it to living in a fishbowl.

linked-image
Image above: STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins watches a container
of food floating freely on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Discovery.
Image credit: NASA


“Even though women went through pilot training at other bases in 1976 and 1977, we were the first ones at our base,” Collins said. “So I got used to this, ‘OK, here’s the women. Let’s do the interviews, get all that stuff out of the way. OK, now it’s time to train.’ You’ve got to work on training, but yet you still live in a fishbowl because everybody’s asking, ‘How’d the women do on the check rides?’ We were a test program.”

So when she became the first woman pilot in the space shuttle program 11 years later, she was expecting more of the same. She was pleasantly surprised.

“I think there was a little bit of that here at NASA, but not much because of the women that went through as mission specialists before me,” she said. “They all did very well. I mean, they were superior in the work they did. So when I came here as a woman pilot, it was much easier for me to just fit right in.”

By the time she became the first woman space shuttle commander 20 years later, being a woman wasn’t an issue at all. That’s not to say, however, that there weren’t challenges.

“My experience has been different than the men’s not in the office, only at home,” Collins said. “Because when I come home, I’m clearly a mom. My husband does a lot of things around the house, but he does the traditional male stuff, and I do the traditional female stuff. The kids bring their backpacks home from school and I go through them and make sure all the notes from the teachers are done. I make sure they’re signed up for their activities and have a way to get there.”

Like many working mothers, Collins said that the balancing act that required was the hardest part of her job. When she was training for a mission, it might mean putting the children to bed at 8:30 p.m. and then sitting down at the computer for another three hours of work. And the last mission she flew kept her away from home for five weeks because the launch was delayed.

linked-image
Image above: Astronaut Eileen Collins is photographed near a
T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center,
Houston.
Image credit: NASA


“But it was manageable,” she said. “And the mission is eventually going to fly. I would say there’s a lot of people in professional jobs around this city, around the country, that spend more time away from their families than I ever did as an astronaut.”

Which is why Collins said she is confused by the lack of women lining up to take her place. The second woman shuttle commander, Pam Melroy, is scheduled to go up in 2007, but she’s the only woman pilot still in the program.

“We haven’t hired any women pilots since 1995, and I’m wondering where they are,” Collins said. “I know there are qualified women out there who would love to do this job, and I encourage them to look at this job and to realize that I have had an extremely rewarding career with a lot of flexibility. I’m married. I’ve had two children while I was in the astronaut office. In the 16 years I was here, I’ve flown four missions and had two children, and I’ve been able to do that without too much heartache.”


Brandi Dean
Johnson Space Center, Houston


Source: NASA - Astronauts

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 01:39 AM

Astronaut Ed Lu Leaves NASA

The linked-image press release is reproduced below:

Allard Beutel
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-4769
allard.beutel@nasa.gov

Kylie Clem
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
kylie.s.clem@nasa.gov
Aug 10, 2007

RELEASE: 07-176

Astronaut Ed Lu Leaves NASA


HOUSTON - Veteran International Space Station astronaut and space shuttle flyer Ed Lu has left NASA to accept a position in the private sector. Lu flew on two shuttle missions and lived six months aboard the station as a member of the orbiting laboratory's seventh crew.

"Ed has done an exceptional job as an astronaut during his twelve years of service," said Chief of the Astronaut Office Steve Lindsey. "He contributed greatly to the construction and operations on the International Space Station, particularly in the very difficult period after the Columbia tragedy. Additionally, his involvement in development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle will help NASA tremendously as we look forward to exploring our solar system. He will be missed by the Astronaut Office and NASA. We wish him the very best in his future endeavors."

Lu's experience includes more than six hours spacewalking. He was the first American to launch as flight engineer of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft as well as the first American to both launch and land on a Soyuz. He has visited two space stations on his missions.

Selected as an astronaut in 1994, Lu first flew in May 1997 aboard Atlantis for the STS-84 mission, the sixth shuttle mission to visit the Russian space station Mir. He next flew in 2000 on mission STS-106, also aboard Atlantis, performing a spacewalk during that flight to help outfit the Zvezda module of the International Space Station, the outpost's living quarters. Launching on the Soyuz, Lu returned to the International Space Station in 2003 as flight engineer and NASA science officer of Expedition 7, the first two-person resident crew.

For more biographical information about Lu, visit:


For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/

- end -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source: NASA Press Release 07-176

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 04:29 AM

Veteran Astronaut and Spacewalker Robert Curbeam Leaves NASA

The linked-image press release is reproduced below:

Dec 7, 2007
Mike Curie
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-4715
michael.j.curie@nasa.gov

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
nicole.cloutier-1@nasa.gov


RELEASE: 07-268

Veteran Astronaut and Spacewalker Robert Curbeam Leaves NASA


HOUSTON - NASA astronaut Robert Curbeam, Jr., has left NASA to take a job in the private sector.

"Bob has served his country with distinction for more than 23 years, both as an astronaut and naval officer," said Brent Jett, director of the Flight Crew Operations Directorate at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "His accomplishments and talents are truly extraordinary. We are grateful for his service at NASA and wish him well in his new career."

Curbeam most recently served as deputy director of the Flight Crew Operations Directorate. He has flown on three space shuttle missions. On his last flight, STS-116 in December 2006, Curbeam became the first shuttle astronaut ever to conduct four spacewalks in a single mission. During the spacewalks, he assisted in clearing problems that had prevented the folding of a solar array wing on the International Space Station and completed other assembly tasks.

Curbeam also flew on STS-85 in August 1997 and STS-98 in February 2001. During the STS-98 mission, he performed three spacewalks to help install the space station's Destiny laboratory. He has accumulated 45 hours and 34 minutes of spacewalking time and more than 900 hours in space.

NASA selected Curbeam as an astronaut in December 1994. He has served in a variety of technical and management positions within the Astronaut Office in Houston. He also served as deputy associate administrator for safety and mission assurance at NASA Headquarters in Washington and as director of safety, reliability and quality assurance for the Constellation Program.

For Curbeam's complete biography, visit:

For more information about NASA's International Space Station Program, visit:
_http://www.nasa.gov/station

- end -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Source: NASA Press Release 07-268

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 08 December 2007 - 04:38 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 03:16 AM

Astronaut Alan Poindexter Leaves NASA


The NASA press release is reproduced below:

Dec 10, 2010

Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston    
281-483-5111
nicole.cloutier-1@nasa.gov          
      

RELEASE : 10-331

Astronaut Alan Poindexter Leaves NASA


HOUSTON -- Veteran NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter has left the agency to return to the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.
Poindexter, a U.S. Navy captain, earned a Master of Science degree in aeronautical engineering from the school in 1995. He will return to serve as the dean of students and executive director of programs.

"Dex was a well-respected leader within our office," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "We will miss him being part of our team and wish him the best in his new role as he continues his service to the Navy and the country."

A veteran of two spaceflights, Poindexter logged more than 669 hours in space. In 2008, he was the pilot on the STS-122 space shuttle mission to deliver and install the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory to the International Space Station. In 2010, he was the commander for STS-131, a resupply mission to the station that delivered more than 13,000 pounds of hardware and equipment.

He was selected as an astronaut candidate in June 1998 and served in the Astronaut Office Shuttle Operations Branch as the lead support astronaut at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. He also served as a spacecraft communicator, or capcom, for several missions.

For Poindexter's biographical information, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/poindexter.html  

- end -
___________________________


Source: NASA - Press Release HQ-10-331

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#9    DONTEATUS

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 11:53 PM

We owe a Great Deal to these Grand People  ! Cheer`s to you all! :rolleyes:

This is a Work in Progress!

#10    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 07:28 PM

Astronaut Marsha Ivins Leaves NASA


The NASA press release is reproduced below:

Jan. 04, 2011

Michael Curie
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
michael.curie@nasa.gov

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
nicole.cloutier-1@nasa.gov          
      

RELEASE : 11-002

Astronaut Marsha Ivins Leaves NASA


HOUSTON -- NASA astronaut Marsha Ivins, a veteran of five spaceflights, has retired from the agency.

"Marsha's incredible depth of mission experience and technical expertise has been a tremendous asset to this office," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "We have relied on her expertise for years in many diverse areas, including but not limited to crew provisions, optimal hardware packing, human ratings development, vehicle habitability and orbiter preflight vehicle checks. Her expertise and dedication to NASA's mission will be sorely missed."

Ivins joined NASA in 1974 as an engineer. She worked on space shuttle displays, controls, man-machine engineering and the development of the orbiter's head-up display. She served in Johnson's aircraft operations as a flight engineer for the Shuttle Training Aircraft and copilot of the Gulfstream I.

Ivins was selected as an astronaut in 1984. She spent more than 1,300 hours in space during five shuttle flights: STS-32 in 1990, STS-46 in 1992, STS-62 in 1994, STS-81 in 1997 and STS-98 in 2001.

Ivins most recently worked within the Astronaut Office supporting the Space Shuttle, International Space Station and Constellation Programs.

For Ivins' complete astronaut biographical information, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/ivins.html


For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

- end -
___________________________


Source: NASA - Press Release HQ-11-002

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 15 January 2011 - 11:43 AM.
corrected source link.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#11    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 11:42 AM

Astronaut Jose Hernandez Leaves NASA


The NASA press release is reproduced below:

Jan. 14, 2011

Michael Curie
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
michael.curie@nasa.gov

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
nicole.cloutier-1@nasa.gov          
      

RELEASE : 11-018

Astronaut Jose Hernandez Leaves NASA


HOUSTON -- After a decade working in various roles, astronaut Jose Hernandez has left NASA for a position in the aerospace industry.

"Jose's talent and dedication have contributed greatly to the agency, and he is an inspiration to many," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "We wish him all the best with this new phase of his career."

The son of Mexican migrant farm workers, he joined NASA in 2001 as a materials research engineer at Johnson. He was promoted to the Materials and Processes Branch chief in 2002 and served there until he was selected as a NASA astronaut in 2004.

During the STS-128 shuttle mission in 2009, he managed the transfer of more than 18,000 pounds of supplies and equipment between the shuttle and International Space Station and assisted with robotics operations. He also served as a flight engineer in the shuttle's cockpit during launch and landing.

For Hernandez' complete astronaut biographical information, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/hernandez-jm.html


For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

- end -
___________________________


Source: NASA - Press Release HQ-11-018

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#12    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 10:31 PM

NASA Astronaut Garrett Reisman Leaves Agency


The NASA press release is reproduced below:

March 04, 2011

Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
nicole.cloutier-1@nasa.gov          
      

RELEASE : 11-062

NASA Astronaut Garrett Reisman Leaves Agency


HOUSTON -- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman has left the agency to return to private industry. Reisman is a veteran of two spaceflight missions, including a long-duration mission on the International Space Station.

"I had the pleasure of working with Garrett in space during Expedition 16," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "He is an incredibly accomplished professional and well-known for his great sense of humor. We wish him the best in this new phase of his career, but we will miss him greatly."

Reisman, who holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering, joined NASA in 1998. Before flying in space, he served in multiple technical roles including work supporting robotics and the advanced vehicles branch of the Astronaut Office.

Reisman's first spaceflight mission was as flight engineer during Expeditions 16 and 17 on the station in 2008. During his three months aboard, he performed a seven-hour spacewalk, conducted numerous robotics activities and participated in the installation of the Japanese Kibo laboratory and its logistics module.

Reisman visited the station again during his second spaceflight, STS-132 in May 2010. He conducted two additional spacewalks during the mission, logging 14 more hours outside.

For Reisman's biography, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/reisman.html

- end -
___________________________


Source: NASA - Press Release HQ-11-062

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#13    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 01:01 PM

NASA Astronaut Brent Jett Leaves Agency



www.nasa.gov said:

02.04.13

Kyle Herring
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111

Jay Bolden
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111          


RELEASE :  J13-003

NASA Astronaut Brent Jett Leaves Agency


HOUSTON – Astronaut Brent Jett has left the agency following a NASA career including four space shuttle flights, heading the agency’s Flight Crew Operations Directorate and most recently serving as deputy manager of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

"Brent has been a remarkable asset to NASA and our human spaceflight programs," said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations (HEO) at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "He was a successful pilot and an accomplished commander. His work in Russia and in Houston has really helped position the agency for our future endeavors with space station and commercial crew operations. On behalf of the entire HEO team, I wish Brent the best of luck in his new phase of life."

After being selected to be an astronaut with the Class of 1992, Jett flew four space shuttle missions – two as pilot and two as commander. His first mission aboard Endeavour on STS-72 in January 1996 included the retrieval of a Japanese free-flying science satellite. He next flew a year later in January 1997 aboard Atlantis on STS-81 to the Russian Mir space station, delivering supplies and experiments and swapping one NASA astronaut for another as part of the Phase I Shuttle-Mir Program.

Soon after his second flight, Jett served as one of the early directors of NASA’s operations in Star City, Russia, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, helping establish the training protocols for astronauts traveling to Mir and eventually to the International Space Station.

His two commands on missions to the station were aboard Endeavour on STS-97 in November/December 2000, delivering early power systems and the first pair of 240-foot-long solar arrays, and aboard Atlantis on STS-115 in September 2006, signalling the resumption of station assembly following the Columbia accident. That mission included the delivery of another power module and deployment of two additional pair of solar arrays, which doubled the station’s electrical power generating capability.

His accomplishments on Earth helped position the agency for the future as director of Flight Crew Operations from 2007 to 2011 and as deputy manager of the Commercial Crew Program laying the groundwork for the development of spacecraft that will restore U.S. human spaceflight transportation to and from the station.

"Brent was an incredible leader for the Commercial Crew Program, the agency and the nation," said Ed Mango, Commercial Crew Program manager. "His efforts helped our country put together a strong foundation in order to build a home-grown capability for human access to low Earth orbit."

Jett retired from the U.S. Navy as a captain in 2007 after more than 26 years of service. He had logged more than 5,000 flight hours in more than 30 different aircraft and performed more than 450 aircraft carrier landings. His experience on four shuttle missions totaled 42 days in space while traveling 17 million miles and orbiting the Earth 659 times.

For Jett’s complete biography, visit:
http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/jett.html

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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#14    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

NASA Astronaut Clayton C. Anderson Leaves Agency



www.nasa.gov said:

02.04.13

Jay Bolden
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111          


RELEASE :  J13-004

NASA Astronaut Clayton C. Anderson Leaves Agency


HOUSTON -- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson has retired from the space agency. Anderson flew in space twice, first in 2007 as a flight engineer for Expeditions 15 and 16 aboard the International Space Station, and finally as a mission specialist on STS-131 in 2010.

Anderson began his 30-year NASA career in 1983 as an engineer in the Mission Planning and Analysis Division at Johnson Space Center. He was selected as an astronaut in 1998. He trained as a backup crew member for Expeditions 12, 13 and 14. He most recently served in management and as space station Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM). Anderson conducted six spacewalks and has more than 167 days of spaceflight experience.

"Clay will certainly be missed in the Astronaut Office, especially for his technical expertise. His combination of shuttle, station long duration, and spacewalk experience was extremely valuable to us," said Bob Behnken, chief of the Astronaut Office. "We wish him continued success in future endeavors, and know he will continue to captivate whenever and wherever he shares his spaceflight experiences."

Anderson holds a Master of Science in aerospace engineering from Iowa State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in physics from Hastings College.

For Anderson's complete biography, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/mPXyBj

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

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