Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

How big is big?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,216 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:29 AM

How big is big? Probing the conditions of the universe on the largest scales

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) press release is reproduced below:

May 15, 2006

user posted image
  
The SDSS telescope at Apache Point, NM has been used to create a map of regular galaxies (black points) and luminous red galaxies (red points) out to 40% of the distance to the edge of the visible universe. Light from the most distant red galaxies has taken 5.6 billion years to reach us, while the edge of the visible universe is 13.7 billion light years away. This map of the universe allowed astronomers to detect galactic structures more than a billion light years across.
(Credit - Hogg, SDSS-II collaboration)


Since the 1970s, astronomers have discovered structures in the three-dimensional distribution of galaxies on ever larger scales, up to hundreds of millions of light years. Today, researchers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II) announced the first measurements of galactic structures more than a billion light years across.

The three-dimensional map was built by observing more than 600,000 galaxies in SDSS-II data covering over one-tenth of the sky. "The volume probed here is the same as a cube 5.3 billion light years on a side," said principal author Nikhil Padmanabhan of Princeton University. "It reaches one-third of the way to the edge of the observable Universe, and we measure structures that extend over a significant fraction of that distance."

"Structure on these scales were previously measured only in the cosmic microwave background radiation," the cooled glow of the Big Bang that bathes the Earth from all directions, added co-author Uros Seljak, also of Princeton. By comparing the new measurements to the microwave background data, astronomers can test whether these enormous cosmic structures have grown at the expected rate between the time the cosmic microwaves were emitted and the time that the light of the new structures was emitted," said Padmanabhan.

"These measurements give much better determinations of the amount of dark matter in the Universe, and they also probe the nature of dark energy, the mysterious substance accelerating the expansion of the Universe."

"With the new measurements, our emerging picture of a Universe dominated by dark matter and dark energy had a chance to fall on its face. Instead, it passed a new test with flying colors," Seljak stated.

One especially exciting feature of the new measurements is the detection of galactic structure imprinted by cosmic sound waves in the early Universe. These sound waves have a length scale of 450 million light years, and they were first detected in early 2005 by independent teams from the SDSS-II and the Two Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS).

The new study is the first to detect these sound waves at large distances from Earth that probe earlier cosmic epochs.

"Astronomers are falling over themselves to measure the precise length of these sound waves," said co-author David Schlegel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. "Measuring this 'standard ruler' at different epochs is one of the best tools we have for studying dark energy, the component of modern cosmology we understand least."

The new study uses a novel and efficient technique for mapping structure over a very large volume. Traditionally, astronomers determine distances to galaxies by measuring the changes in their colors caused by the expansion of the Universe. These changes are subtle, so this method usually requires a time-consuming, individual analysis for each galaxy. Researchers typically have to spread its light into a spectrum to reveal sharp features that can be precisely measured.

The SDSS-II team instead focused on a special class of galaxies, luminous red galaxies, whose true colors are very regular and well understood. As their name suggests, these are some of the brightest and reddest galaxies in the Universe. These highly accurate color measurements in the SDSS-II data are sufficient on their own to yield approximate distances for these galaxies. And they are precise enough for large scale clustering studies.

The new measurements are the first to show that this technique can reveal structure on the largest scales, with enough detail to detect sound waves and probe dark energy.

The relation between color and distance was calibrated using spectral measurements for a small subset of the sample, obtained by an international collaboration of astronomers from the SDSS-II and the Australian-UK Two Degree Field (2dF) team.

This hybrid technique allows us to use all of our data to maximal effect," said co-author Daniel Eisenstein of the University of Arizona. "We leveraged precise observations of 10,000 galaxies to gain fuzzy distances to nearly a million galaxies. The loss in accuracy is more than made up for by the sheer numbers we can now use."

The findings are presented in "The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data," a paper submitted to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, and available on the astrophysics preprint server, http://arxiv.org/astro-ph/0605302
on Monday, May 15th.

A simultaneous and independent analysis by a team of astronomers from Canada and the UK, led by University of British Columbia researcher Chris Blake, reached similar conclusions, analyzing a similar but not identical data set. Their research paper was also released today on the astrophysics preprint server.

Authors:
  • Nikhil Padmanabhan, Princeton University
  • David J. Schlegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories
  • Uros Seljak, Princeton University and ICTP
  • Alexey Makarov, Princeton University
  • Neta A. Bahcall, Princeton University
  • Michael R. Blanton, New York University
  • Jonathan Brinkmann, New York University
  • Daniel J. Eisenstein, University of Arizona
  • Douglas P. Finkbeiner, Princeton University
  • James E. Gunn, Princeton University
  • David W. Hogg, New York University
  • Zeljko Ivezic, University of Washington
  • Gillian R. Knapp, Princeton University
  • Jon Loveday, University of Sussex
  • Robert H. Lupton, Princeton University
  • Robert C. Nichol, University of Portsmouth
  • Donald P. Schneider, Pennsylvania State University
  • Michael A. Strauss, Princeton University
  • Max Tegmark, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research
  • Donald G. York, Enrico Fermi Institute


Source: SDSS press release

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#2    novaceleste

novaceleste

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,349 posts
  • Joined:08 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:somewhere in Texas

Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:45 AM

Wow. That is big. I'm really glad you were talking about the universe and not something else.  laugh.gif  rofl.gif  laugh.gif



Not all who wander are lost.

#3    Bone_Collector

Bone_Collector

    -> SkEpToMaNiAc <-

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,334 posts
  • Joined:05 Oct 2004
  • Gender:Male

  • You savvy?

Posted 18 May 2006 - 09:37 AM

Quote


Wow. That is big. I'm really glad you were talking about the universe and not something else.  laugh.gif  rofl.gif  laugh.gif

laugh.gif

The article said that the three dimensional map was built by observing more than 600,000 galaxies, stretching more than a billion light years across. WOW!

HUUUUUGEEEEE is a small word.

Edited by Bone_Collector, 18 May 2006 - 09:40 AM.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep... and miles to go before I sleep ~Robert Frost

#4    kaknelson

kaknelson

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,666 posts
  • Joined:20 Feb 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:zion

Posted 18 May 2006 - 10:25 AM

"team of astronomers from Canada and the UK, led by University of British Columbia researcher Chris Blake" - right on.

Cool post waspie, i adore astronomy.  thumbsup.gif

So huaaagge! lol...

Our universe is thought to be a finite or infinite space-time continuum. And, I heard if one was to go straight possible through in space forever, you'd eventually end up at the same spot. Circular, similar to infinite ( 8 ) sign with numbers; counting forever, you'd eventually return back to zero. Therefore space, is infinite and circular i suppose?

Tell me if this theory is somewhat correct.  wacko.gif

Edited by Kaknelson, 18 May 2006 - 10:28 AM.

.  .      .   .    .   .      .      .       .       .     .       .    .    .        .    .             .      .

\_0v | h @nwR


Posted Image

#5    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 34,216 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 May 2006 - 01:30 PM

Quote


Therefore space, is infinite and circular i suppose?

Tell me if this theory is somewhat correct.  wacko.gif


The universe is sometimes called finite but boundless. The universe cannot be infinite as it has been expanding at a finite speed for a finite amount of time. It is boundless because (as you say) you will never reach its edge.

Imagine a two dimensional creature living on the surface of a balloon. The balloon is expanding. The creature can measure the expansion as every point on the surface of the balloon is moving away from every other point. However being 2 dimensional it can not really comprehend the 3rd dimension that its balloon universe is expanding into.

This 2 dimensional creature decides to travel to the edge of its universe. It will travel in a straight line (remember it has no way of realising it is traveling in the 3rd dimension). Eventually the puzzled creature will return to where it started. This will seem impossible because it traveled in a straight line.

Now if you take this situation and make it a 3 dimensional creature on the surface of a 3 dimensional balloon expanding into a 4th dimension you have a model of us in our universe.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#6    kaknelson

kaknelson

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,666 posts
  • Joined:20 Feb 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:zion

Posted 20 May 2006 - 10:30 PM

Quote


The universe is sometimes called finite but boundless. The universe cannot be infinite as it has been expanding at a finite speed for a finite amount of time. It is boundless because (as you say) you will never reach its edge.

Imagine a two dimensional creature living on the surface of a balloon. The balloon is expanding. The creature can measure the expansion as every point on the surface of the balloon is moving away from every other point. However being 2 dimensional it can not really comprehend the 3rd dimension that its balloon universe is expanding into.

This 2 dimensional creature decides to travel to the edge of its universe. It will travel in a straight line (remember it has no way of realising it is traveling in the 3rd dimension). Eventually the puzzled creature will return to where it started. This will seem impossible because it traveled in a straight line.

Now if you take this situation and make it a 3 dimensional creature on the surface of a 3 dimensional balloon expanding into a 4th dimension you have a model of us in our universe.


Hmm...

Very interesting sceintific conception.

.  .      .   .    .   .      .      .       .       .     .       .    .    .        .    .             .      .

\_0v | h @nwR


Posted Image

#7    Master Sage

Master Sage

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 753 posts
  • Joined:13 Feb 2006
  • Location:A Galexy far far Away

  • DRAGONZ!!!!

Posted 20 May 2006 - 11:15 PM

Thats quite big, i'll say!

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#8    Lottie

Lottie

    The Nappy Ninja !!

  • Member
  • 7,516 posts
  • Joined:13 Oct 2003
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

  • "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me." - Noel Coward

Posted 20 May 2006 - 11:20 PM

How big is big? Very difficult to comprehend  blink.gif . Fab article Waspie!!





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users