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THE MOST POWERFUL MEAT EATER OF ALL TIME


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31 replies to this topic

#16    Twisted

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 02:50 PM

Just more primitive.

Carcharodontosaurus teeth are nothing like T-Rex's teeth tho. I have a cast of Carcharodontosaurus tooth and it knive shaped nowere near as strong as T-Rex teeth or as big to my knowledge, I'll have to look into it. Im not sure about Giginatosaurus and Saurophaganax.

Edited by Twisted, 28 June 2006 - 02:57 PM.


#17    frogfish

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 07:43 PM

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Im not sure about Giginatosaurus and Saurophaganax

Gignatosaurus's teeth are 7-inch steak knives...in essence.
Saurophaganax's teeth are identical to Allosaurus. Except bigger.

Edited by frogfish, 28 June 2006 - 07:44 PM.

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#18    Twisted

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 03:34 PM

Interesting thanks....


#19    snuffypuffer

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 03:48 PM

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Gignatosaurus's teeth are 7-inch steak knives...in essence.
Saurophaganax's teeth are identical to Allosaurus. Except bigger.


If Saurophaganax is only known from a vertebrae, how do we know anything about it's teeth? Has any more of this animal been found since the vertebra?

Nothing to see here.

#20    frogfish

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 01:38 AM

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If Saurophaganax is only known from a vertebrae, how do we know anything about it's teeth? Has any more of this animal been found since the vertebra?

It's known from a couple bones, and is thought to be a subspecies of Allosaurus or another allosaur.

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#21    lowbro

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 07:13 AM

What about that dino Deinocheirus (terrible hand)?

They've only found the hands but they are HUGE!

Maybe it didnt have huge jaws to kill because the hands evolved to be sufficient enough to kill. If it is bi-pedial, i think it has the biggest hands for its size, considering most bi-pedial carnivores have small hands or fore limbs in ratio to their body size. (eg t-rex)
Maybe its bigger than we think?
Cant answer many questions until we find the rest i guess? hmm.gif

here is a link Source



#22    frogfish

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 04:44 PM

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Maybe it didnt have huge jaws to kill because the hands evolved to be sufficient enough to kill. If it is bi-pedial, i think it has the biggest hands for its size, considering most bi-pedial carnivores have small hands or fore limbs in ratio to their body size. (eg t-rex)
Maybe its bigger than we think?

Deinocheirus is thought to be related to gallimimus, as the skeleton exhibits similar structures...They think it is about 40 feet long, and if it is related to deinocheirus, then it is an omnivore/insectivore.

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#23    snuffypuffer

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 05:40 PM

A 40 foot long insectivore?

Nothing to see here.

#24    frogfish

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 05:43 PM

Yep...Not fully insectivore...More of an omnivore also.

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#25    snuffypuffer

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 07:35 PM

That's a derned big insectivore. But hell, the biggest whales only eat tiny little shrimp, so it's not like it never happens. Still, it must have eaten a LOT of insects.

Nothing to see here.

#26    frogfish

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 07:48 PM

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That's a derned big insectivore. But hell, the biggest whales only eat tiny little shrimp, so it's not like it never happens. Still, it must have eaten a LOT of insects.

It also was probably the fastest dinosaur ever.

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#27    lowbro

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:37 AM

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Deinocheirus is thought to be related to gallimimus, as the skeleton exhibits similar structures...They think it is about 40 feet long, and if it is related to deinocheirus, then it is an omnivore/insectivore.


I think thats the biggest "mimic" species ever? I wonder why it would need to be that huge? Most "mimic" species like gallimimus are reasonably small compared to Deinocheirus? Maybe theres an inbetween species that is in the middle?

Quote

It also was probably the fastest dinosaur ever.


Id vouch for that! It steps must have been huge if its related gallimimus which is like second?


#28    frogfish

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:40 AM

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Maybe theres an inbetween species that is in the middle?

There could...there could not...

Depends on whether or not you believe in punctuated evolution or gradualism..

Edited by frogfish, 03 July 2006 - 12:41 AM.

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#29    lowbro

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 12:03 AM

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Depends on whether or not you believe in punctuated evolution or gradualism..


I mostly believe in natural selection as an evolution theory. But some animals have the capacity to evolve to their environment quite quickly.

Gradualism is common with reptiles/amphibians but still is highly dependant on their environment. Bigger is not always better and visa versa.




#30    frogfish

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 01:10 AM

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I mostly believe in natural selection as an evolution theory. But some animals have the capacity to evolve to their environment quite quickly.

Gradualism is common with reptiles/amphibians but still is highly dependant on their environment. Bigger is not always better and visa versa.

Sometimes bigger is better...especially in the Reptilian world...

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